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Moses Chibesa

Bio: Moses Chibesa is an academic researcher from University of KwaZulu-Natal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ecology & Medicine. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 17 citations.
Topics: Ecology, Medicine, Biodiversity, Frugivore, Trumpeter

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Joseph A. Tobias, Catherine Sheard, Alex L. Pigot, Adam J. M. Devenish, Jingyi Yang, Ferran Sayol, Montague H. C. Neate-Clegg, Nico Alioravainen, Thomas L. Weeks, Robert A. Barber, Patrick Walkden, Hannah E. A. MacGregor, Samuel E. I. Jones, Claire Vincent, Anna G. Phillips, Nicola M. Marples, Flavia A. Montaño-Centellas, Victor Leandro-Silva, Santiago Claramunt, Bianca Darski, Benjamin G. Freeman, Tom P. Bregman, Christopher R. Cooney, Emma C. Hughes, Elliot J. R. Capp, Zoë K. Varley, Nicholas R. Friedman, H. Korntheuer, Andrea Corrales-Vargas, Christopher H. Trisos, Brian E. Weeks, Dagmar M. Hanz, Till Töpfer, Gustavo A. Bravo, Vladimír Remeš, Larissa Nowak, Lincoln Silva Carneiro, A. Moncada R., Beata Matysioková, Daniel T. Baldassarre, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Jared D. Wolfe, Philip Chapman, Benjamin G. Daly, Marjorie C. Sorensen, Alexander Neu, Michael A. Ford, Rebekah J. Mayhew, Luís Fábio Silveira, David J. Kelly, Nathaniel N. D. Annorbah, Henry S. Pollock, Ada Grabowska-Zhang, Jay P. McEntee, Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez, Camila G. Meneses, Marcia Muñoz, Luke L. Powell, Gabriel A. Jamie, Thomas J. Matthews, Oscar W. Johnson, Guilherme R. R. Brito, Kristof Zyskowski, Ross Crates, Michael G. Harvey, Maura Jurado Zevallos, Peter A. Hosner, Tom Bradfer-Lawrence, James M. Maley, F. Gary Stiles, Hevana Santana de Lima, Kaiya L. Provost, Moses Chibesa, Mmatjie L. Mashao, Jeffrey T. Howard, Edson Mlamba, Marcus A.H. Chua, Bicheng Li, Maria I. Gómez, Natalia C. García, Martin Päckert, Jérôme Fuchs, Jarome R. Ali, Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Monica L. Carlson, Rolly C. Urriza, Kristin E. Brzeski, Dewi M. Prawiradilaga, Matt J. Rayner, Eliot T. Miller, Rauri C. K. Bowie, René-Marie Lafontaine, R. Paul Scofield, Yingqiang Lou, Lankani Somarathna, Denis Lepage, Marshall Illif, Eike Lena Neuschulz, Mathias Templin, D. Matthias Dehling, Jacob C. Cooper, Olivier S. G. Pauwels, Kangkuso Analuddin, Jon Fjeldså, Nathalie Seddon, Paul R. Sweet, Fabrice DeClerck, Luciano Nicolás Naka, Jeffrey D. Brawn, Alexandre Aleixo, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Carsten Rahbek, Susanne A. Fritz, Gavin H. Thomas, Matthias Schleuning 
TL;DR: The AVONET dataset as discussed by the authors contains comprehensive functional trait data for all birds, including six ecological variables, 11 continuous morphological traits, and information on range size and location, from 90,020 individuals of 11,009 extant bird species sampled from 181 countries.
Abstract: Functional traits offer a rich quantitative framework for developing and testing theories in evolutionary biology, ecology and ecosystem science. However, the potential of functional traits to drive theoretical advances and refine models of global change can only be fully realised when species-level information is complete. Here we present the AVONET dataset containing comprehensive functional trait data for all birds, including six ecological variables, 11 continuous morphological traits, and information on range size and location. Raw morphological measurements are presented from 90,020 individuals of 11,009 extant bird species sampled from 181 countries. These data are also summarised as species averages in three taxonomic formats, allowing integration with a global phylogeny, geographical range maps, IUCN Red List data and the eBird citizen science database. The AVONET dataset provides the most detailed picture of continuous trait variation for any major radiation of organisms, offering a global template for testing hypotheses and exploring the evolutionary origins, structure and functioning of biodiversity.

154 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated various environmental variables believed to influence the site occupancy and detection probability of Trumpeter Hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) in urban-forest mosaics of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
Abstract: Understanding the factors determining the occupancy and detection probability of birds in human dominated environments is important for their conservation. In this study we investigated various environmental variables believed to influence the site occupancy and detection probability of Trumpeter Hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) in urban-forest mosaics of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Presence/absence data were collected from a total of 50 point count stations established between September 2014 and March 2015 in urban-forest mosaics of Durban, Eshowe and Mtunzini. Mean occupancy rate of Trumpeter Hornbill was 0.40 ± 0.09 with a low detection probability of 0.28 ± 0.04. For Trumpeter Hornbills, large trees influenced their occupancy positively (sum AIC weight (ω i ) = 79%) while relative human abundance negatively influenced their occupancy (ω i = 91%). Model selection suggested that housing density had a strong negative influence on detection probability of Trumpeter Hornbills (ω i = 82 % ) and availability of fruiting trees influenced their detection positively (ω i = 29%). With continued changing land use in KwaZulu-Natal, these finding are important for conservation of Trumpeter Hornbills as we provide insight into landscape variables or features that influence Trumpeter Hornbill’s occupancy and detection in areas of urban-forest mosaics.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper reviewed case studies of vertebrate species' responses to urbanisation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to determine trends and presented a novel modification to the final of three phases of the framework described by Evans et al. (2010).
Abstract: Urbanisation is rapidly transforming natural landscapes with consequences for biodiversity. Little is documented on the response of African wildlife to urbanisation. We reviewed case studies of vertebrate species' responses to urbanisation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to determine trends. Connected habitat mosaics of natural and anthropogenic green spaces are critical for urban wildlife persistence. We present a novel modification to the final of three phases of the framework described by Evans et al. (2010), which documents this sequence for vertebrate species persistence, based on the perspective of our research. Species in suburbia exhibit an initial phase where behavioural and ecological flexibility, life-history traits and phenotypic plasticity either contribute to their success, or they stay at low numbers. Where successful, the next phase is a rapid increase in populations and distribution; anthropogenic food resources and alternate breeding sites are effectively exploited. The modified third phase either continues to spread, plateau or decline.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
21 Apr 2017-Ostrich
TL;DR: Despite the negative impacts of urbanisation, some species adapt to pressures of habitat loss and fragmentation as mentioned in this paper, such as the Trumpeter Hornbills bycanistes bucinator.
Abstract: Despite the negative impacts of urbanisation, some species adapt to pressures of habitat loss and fragmentation. Trumpeter Hornbills Bycanistes bucinator are a large avian forest frugivore that use...

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the contamination of heavy metals in the Largescale Yellowfish (Labeobarbus marequensis) from the Solwezi River in North-western Zambia was investigated.
Abstract: Abstract The contamination of heavy metals in the Largescale Yellowfish (Labeobarbus marequensis) from the Solwezi River in North-western Zambia was investigated. The fish were captured from three different sampling sites on the Solwezi River. Site I was located before the mining effluents could join the river, site II was located immediately after the entry point of the mining effluent into the river, while site III was located downstream of where the effluents from the mining company had joined the river. The water and fish organs (muscle, gills, and liver) were checked for contamination with heavy metals. The values were compared with the established permissive levels considered safe for human consumption by the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Food and Agriculture Organization. In decreasing order, the contamination levels in fish organs were: Fe > Zn > Cu (gills), Fe > Zn > Cu (liver) and Zn > Fe > Cu (muscle). Co, Mn, and Pb were not detected in all the parts of the fish investigated. In water, the concentrations were in the order Zn > Fe > CU. The Metal Pollution Index (MPI) showed that site II was the most concentrated with heavy metals, while the gills were the most concentrated part of the fish. These results showed that the levels of the heavy metals investigated in the water and fish were within permissive levels by WHO and FAO. However, future expansion of existing companies and the introduction of new ones should strictly be monitored and their risks studied to safeguard fish and other aquatic products.

4 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In this article , the authors present an overview of the global spatiotemporal distribution of avian biodiversity, changes in our knowledge of that biodiversity, and the extent to which it is imperilled.
Abstract: We present an overview of the global spatiotemporal distribution of avian biodiversity, changes in our knowledge of that biodiversity, and the extent to which it is imperilled. Birds are probably the most completely inventoried large taxonomic class of organisms, permitting a uniquely detailed understanding of how the Anthropocene has shaped their distributions and conservation status in space and time. We summarize the threats driving changes in bird species richness and abundance, highlighting the increasingly synergistic interactions between threats such as habitat loss, climate change, and overexploitation. Many metrics of avian biodiversity are exhibiting globally consistent negative trends, with the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List Index showing a steady deterioration in the conservation status of the global avifauna over the past three decades. We identify key measures to counter this loss of avian biodiversity and associated ecosystem services, which will necessitate increased consideration of the social context of bird conservation interventions in order to deliver positive transformative change for nature. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Environment and Resources, Volume 47 is October 2022. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors use morphometric and ecological traits for 8268 bird species to estimate the impact of climate change on avian functional diversity (FD) and show that future bird assemblages are likely to undergo substantial shifts in trait structure, with a magnitude of change greater than predicted from species richness alone, and a direction of change varying according to geographical location and trophic guild.
Abstract: Climate change is predicted to drive geographical range shifts, leading to fluctuations in species richness (SR) worldwide. However, the effect of these changes on functional diversity (FD) remains unclear, in part because comprehensive species-level trait data are generally lacking at global scales. Here, we use morphometric and ecological traits for 8268 bird species to estimate the impact of climate change on avian FD. We show that future bird assemblages are likely to undergo substantial shifts in trait structure, with a magnitude of change greater than predicted from SR alone, and a direction of change varying according to geographical location and trophic guild. For example, our models predict that FD of insect predators will increase at higher latitudes with concurrent losses at mid-latitudes, whereas FD of seed dispersing birds will fluctuate across the tropics. Our findings highlight the potential for climate change to drive continental-scale shifts in avian FD with implications for ecosystem function and resilience.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Apr 2021-Ostrich
TL;DR: In Africa, increasing human populations and anthropogenic land-use change are generally affecting diversity negatively as mentioned in this paper, but especially in Africa, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, a large number of people are migrating to the region.
Abstract: Globally, but especially in Africa, increasing human populations and anthropogenic land-use change are generally affecting diversity negatively. Urban environments in southern Africa typically comp...

14 citations

Posted ContentDOI
02 Jun 2020-bioRxiv
TL;DR: It is suggested that climate change will drive continental-scale shifts in avian functional diversity, with potentially far-reaching implications for ecosystem functions and resilience.
Abstract: Climate change is predicted to drive geographical range shifts in many taxa, leading to the formation of novel species assemblages and fluctuations in species richness worldwide. However, the effect of these changes on functional diversity is not yet fully understood, in part because comprehensive species-level trait data are generally lacking at global scales. Here we use morphometric and ecological trait data for 8269 terrestrial bird species to compare functional diversity (FD) of current and future bird assemblages under a medium emissions scenario. We show that future assemblages are likely to undergo substantial shifts in trait structure, with the direction and magnitude of these shifts varying with geographical location and trophic guild. Specifically, invertivore FD is projected to increase at higher latitudes with concurrent losses at mid-latitudes, reflecting poleward shifts in range, whereas frugivore FD is projected to fluctuate in many tropical regions with major declines in much of South America and New Guinea. We show that these projected changes in FD are generally greater than expected from changing species richness alone, indicating that projected FD changes are primarily driven by the loss or gain of functionally distinct species. Our findings suggest that climate change will drive continental-scale shifts in avian functional diversity, with potentially far-reaching implications for ecosystem functions and resilience.

13 citations