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Author

Moshe Tur

Bio: Moshe Tur is an academic researcher from Tel Aviv University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Optical fiber & Fiber optic sensor. The author has an hindex of 58, co-authored 633 publications receiving 18513 citations. Previous affiliations of Moshe Tur include Stanford University & École Normale Supérieure.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors demonstrate the ability to multiplex and transfer data between twisted beams of light with different amounts of orbital angular momentum, which provides new opportunities for increasing the data capacity of free-space optical communications links.
Abstract: Researchers demonstrate the ability to multiplex and transfer data between twisted beams of light with different amounts of orbital angular momentum — a development that provides new opportunities for increasing the data capacity of free-space optical communications links.

3,556 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jun 2013-Science
TL;DR: The viability of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light to create orthogonal, spatially distinct streams of data-transmitting channels that are multiplexed in a single fiber is demonstrated and suggest that OAM could provide an additional degree of freedom for data multiplexing in future fiber networks.
Abstract: Internet data traffic capacity is rapidly reaching limits imposed by optical fiber nonlinear effects Having almost exhausted available degrees of freedom to orthogonally multiplex data, the possibility is now being explored of using spatial modes of fibers to enhance data capacity We demonstrate the viability of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light to create orthogonal, spatially distinct streams of data-transmitting channels that are multiplexed in a single fiber Over 11 kilometers of a specially designed optical fiber that minimizes mode coupling, we achieved 400-gigabits-per-second data transmission using four angular momentum modes at a single wavelength, and 16 terabits per second using two OAM modes over 10 wavelengths These demonstrations suggest that OAM could provide an additional degree of freedom for data multiplexing in future fiber networks

2,343 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review recent progress in OAM beam generation/detection, multiplexing/demultiplexing, and its potential applications in different scenarios including free-space optical communications, fiber-optic communications, and RF communications.
Abstract: Orbital angular momentum (OAM), which describes the “phase twist” (helical phase pattern) of light beams, has recently gained interest due to its potential applications in many diverse areas. Particularly promising is the use of OAM for optical communications since: (i) coaxially propagating OAM beams with different azimuthal OAM states are mutually orthogonal, (ii) inter-beam crosstalk can be minimized, and (iii) the beams can be efficiently multiplexed and demultiplexed. As a result, multiple OAM states could be used as different carriers for multiplexing and transmitting multiple data streams, thereby potentially increasing the system capacity. In this paper, we review recent progress in OAM beam generation/detection, multiplexing/demultiplexing, and its potential applications in different scenarios including free-space optical communications, fiber-optic communications, and RF communications. Technical challenges and perspectives of OAM beams are also discussed.

1,398 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work demonstrates a 32-Gbit’s−1 millimetre-wave link over 2.5 metres with a spectral efficiency of ~16 bit s− 1 Hz−1 using four independent orbital–angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations, and shows an 8-Gbits−1 link containing two orbital angular momentum beams with crosstalk less than −12.5 dB.
Abstract: One property of electromagnetic waves that has been recently explored is the ability to multiplex multiple beams, such that each beam has a unique helical phase front. The amount of phase front ‘twisting’ indicates the orbital angular momentum state number, and beams with different orbital angular momentum are orthogonal. Such orbital angular momentum based multiplexing can potentially increase the system capacity and spectral efficiency of millimetre-wave wireless communication links with a single aperture pair by transmitting multiple coaxial data streams. Here we demonstrate a 32-Gbit s−1 millimetre-wave link over 2.5 metres with a spectral efficiency of ~16 bit s−1 Hz−1 using four independent orbital–angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations. All eight orbital angular momentum channels are recovered with bit-error rates below 3.8 × 10−3. In addition, we demonstrate a millimetre-wave orbital angular momentum mode demultiplexer to demultiplex four orbital angular momentum channels with crosstalk less than −12.5 dB and show an 8-Gbit s−1 link containing two orbital angular momentum beams on each of two polarizations. High speed data transmission using orbital angular momentum beams has been recently demonstrated. Here, Yan et al. demonstrate a 32 Gbit/s millimetre-wave communication link using eight coaxially propagating independent orbital angular momentum beams with four orbital angular momentum states on two orthogonal polarizations.

1,002 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work demonstrates the multiplexing/demultiplexing of 1008 data channels carried on 12 OAM beams, 2 polarizations, and 42 wavelengths, providing an aggregate capacity of 100.8 Tbit/s.
Abstract: We investigate the orthogonality of orbital angular momentum (OAM) with other multiplexing domains and present a free-space data link that uniquely combines OAM-, polarization-, and wavelength-division multiplexing. Specifically, we demonstrate the multiplexing/demultiplexing of 1008 data channels carried on 12 OAM beams, 2 polarizations, and 42 wavelengths. Each channel is encoded with 100 Gbit/s quadrature phase-shift keying data, providing an aggregate capacity of 100.8 Tbit/s (12×2×42×100 Gbit/s).

450 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Book
03 Oct 1988
TL;DR: This chapter discusses two Dimensional Systems and Mathematical Preliminaries and their applications in Image Analysis and Computer Vision, as well as image reconstruction from Projections and image enhancement.
Abstract: Introduction. 1. Two Dimensional Systems and Mathematical Preliminaries. 2. Image Perception. 3. Image Sampling and Quantization. 4. Image Transforms. 5. Image Representation by Stochastic Models. 6. Image Enhancement. 7. Image Filtering and Restoration. 8. Image Analysis and Computer Vision. 9. Image Reconstruction From Projections. 10. Image Data Compression.

8,504 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a fast Fourier transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed to discriminate between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour generation techniques.
Abstract: A fast-Fourier-transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed. By computer processing of a noncontour type of fringe pattern, automatic discrimination is achieved between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour-generation techniques. The method has advantages over moire topography and conventional fringe-contour interferometry in both accuracy and sensitivity. Unlike fringe-scanning techniques, the method is easy to apply because it uses no moving components.

3,742 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors demonstrate the ability to multiplex and transfer data between twisted beams of light with different amounts of orbital angular momentum, which provides new opportunities for increasing the data capacity of free-space optical communications links.
Abstract: Researchers demonstrate the ability to multiplex and transfer data between twisted beams of light with different amounts of orbital angular momentum — a development that provides new opportunities for increasing the data capacity of free-space optical communications links.

3,556 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John F. Allen1
TL;DR: Photoplethysmography is a simple and low-cost optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue and is often used non-invasively to make measurements at the skin surface.
Abstract: Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a simple and low-cost optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. It is often used non-invasively to make measurements at the skin surface. The PPG waveform comprises a pulsatile ('AC') physiological waveform attributed to cardiac synchronous changes in the blood volume with each heart beat, and is superimposed on a slowly varying ('DC') baseline with various lower frequency components attributed to respiration, sympathetic nervous system activity and thermoregulation. Although the origins of the components of the PPG signal are not fully understood, it is generally accepted that they can provide valuable information about the cardiovascular system. There has been a resurgence of interest in the technique in recent years, driven by the demand for low cost, simple and portable technology for the primary care and community based clinical settings, the wide availability of low cost and small semiconductor components, and the advancement of computer-based pulse wave analysis techniques. The PPG technology has been used in a wide range of commercially available medical devices for measuring oxygen saturation, blood pressure and cardiac output, assessing autonomic function and also detecting peripheral vascular disease. The introductory sections of the topical review describe the basic principle of operation and interaction of light with tissue, early and recent history of PPG, instrumentation, measurement protocol, and pulse wave analysis. The review then focuses on the applications of PPG in clinical physiological measurements, including clinical physiological monitoring, vascular assessment and autonomic function.

2,836 citations