scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Nadia Vidro

Bio: Nadia Vidro is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Hebrew & Semitic languages. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 52 citations.

Papers
More filters
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The Festschrift as discussed by the authors is a collection of papers in honour of Geoffrey Khan, the Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge, written by his former and current students and post-doctoral re...
Abstract: This Festschrift is a collection of papers in honour of Geoffrey Khan, the Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge, written by his former and current students and post-doctoral re ...

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2022-Zutot
TL;DR: The Book of Commandments of the influential Qaraite scholar Levi b. Yefet is traditionally dated 1006/7 CE as mentioned in this paper , and this date is based on the Hebrew translation of the book of commandments.
Abstract: The Book of Commandments of the influential Qaraite scholar Levi b. Yefet is traditionally dated 1006/7 CE. This date is based on the Hebrew translation of the Book of Commandments and is irreconcilable with a calendrical characteristic of this year provided by Levi b. Yefet. In this article I propose to revise the date of composition of the Book of Commandments to 1009 CE. This date is given in a copy of the Arabic original of the code and is calendrically consistent. I also discuss events in the calendar of Palestinian Qaraites that prompted Levi b. Yefet to mention the year in which he was writing and that took place due to irregular weather patterns.
27 Dec 2022
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors investigated how medieval Qaraite Diaspora communities made a decision to intercalate and provided an in-depth analysis of the Qaraites' attitude toward and use of mathematical methods, such as the method of the vernal equinox and the Rabbanite nineteen-year cycle of intercalations.
Abstract: ABSTRACT:One of the most salient divisions between medieval Rabbanites and Qaraites was in the field of calendar. Qaraites and Rabbanites disagreed on how to determine which years to intercalate (i.e., to extend with the insertion of a thirteenth month) in order to keep up with the seasons. While the Rabbanites used a fixed nineteen-year cycle of intercalation, the Qaraites maintained that intercalation must be based on the state of ripeness of barley crops in Palestine. This created problems for Qaraite communities outside of the Land of Israel, many of whom found it impossible to receive information about the state of crops in Palestine in time to celebrate Passover. This article investigates how medieval Qaraite Diaspora communities made a decision to intercalate. Based on a wide range of sources many of which were not previously discussed, it studies the Diaspora communities' approaches to empirical intercalation and provides an in-depth analysis of the Qaraites' attitude toward and use of mathematical methods, such as the method of the vernal equinox and the Rabbanite nineteen-year cycle of intercalations. The article also reflects on the attitude of Palestinian Qaraite ideologists toward the calendar situation in the Diaspora and argues that the division between Qaraites as adherents of an empirical intercalation vs. Rabbanites as followers of a fixed calculated scheme was never clear-cut when considered in the context of the entire Qaraite Jewish community, and of lived practice rather than ideology.

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1986-Language

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Xeyoixai et al. show that the poet's anger is most likely connected with love, as irvpl Xe'yofiai (i.e.
Abstract: which appear boldly and effectively in this restricted compass. It is still more notable that the poet's anger_is most likely connected with love, as irvpl Xe'yofiai (i.4) would suggest. (The phrase is different from ^Ac'yo/xai: I agree with L. C. Watson, Arae [1991], 262.) The poem thus belongs to an increasing number of finds from or related to Hellenistic elegy which show what seems a combination of ostensibly personal poetry about love with a series of mythological exempla (P. Oxy. 3723; SH 964). We seem even in this case to be dealing with something less massive than the Lyde or the Leontion; and in these papyrus works, at least, the amatory situation was probably a significant subject of the poetry (note here IXVTJCOVTCU doiSai'...cuc TC nvpl Xeyoixai). The connections with Roman elegy are intriguing. Our poet is palpably conscious of the discords and disparities in the material and the types of poetry he brings together. We should not think of these poems as love-elegy at a more primitive stage in its evolution towards 'subjectivity'. Rather we should observe, in elegy, teasing treatment of professedly personal poetry which offers an interesting parallel to the related but different audacities developed by individual Roman poets. The genre itself is particularly important there: Roman elegists affect a compelling delimitation of elegy, but proceed to play with and break out of those limits. H. ascribes this piece to Hermesianax, on the basis of Paus. 7.18.2. One sees the attraction; but his attempt to reduce the interval in style from Hermes, fr. 7 Powell seems fairly forced. Some slight points on the first column. 8: very difficult, -oc j€ prevents a third-foot caesura; a connective T« with dc would produce a very weak clause. It might be worth remembering that OCT€, unlike oc -re, could be postponed (SH 974.1, cf. Hermes, fr. 7.35 Powell); and that the corruption in the couplet might be more complicated or extensive than the omission of one complete line. 10: H. assumes that x°^9\" iS 'he antecedent of dc; it is much more likely Zeus, so that A toe 8eic]ac is to be preferred. SeiAsuits sinners better than war. 18: one would expect the sense to be rather as in e.g. dAA' dAioV ot] e#ij/ce /Se'Aoc (cf. [Theocr.J 25.236, 239, eToicioc, dyejioiAioc; spacing, and word-end, would be acceptable). 19: ^eiSo/xcu seems a curious verb to use of Athene in relation to Heracles (PMG 933 is of course different); and fxeydXwc would then seem a curious adverb for it.

121 citations

Book
26 Mar 2014
TL;DR: A selection of transcribed texts in the Neo-Aramaic dialect of the Jewish community of Zakho, recorded from Zakho-born members of that community living in Jerusalem is presented in this paper.
Abstract: The Jewish communities of Kurdistan spoke various dialects of North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (NENA) as their native language. All of the Jews of Kurdistan immigrated en masse to the newly founded State of Israel in 1951, gradually adopting Modern Hebrew as their language. This volume contains a selection of transcribed texts in the Neo-Aramaic dialect of the Jewish community of Zakho, recorded from Zakho-born members of that community living in Jerusalem. An attempt has been made to give representative texts for several realms of life and of the oral culture, and to provide contextualisation of each text by means of introductory notes. The chapters herein discuss the following topics: oral literature; domestic and communal life; economic life; and linguistic features of the Jewish Nort-Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialect of Zakho. The transcriptions are based on recordings made by the author in course of field work.

19 citations