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Nai Wei Hsu

Bio: Nai Wei Hsu is an academic researcher from National Yang-Ming University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Population. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 8 publications receiving 226 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2005-Chest
TL;DR: Although the anatomic relationship between the esophagus and posterior left atrium (LA) posterior wall varied widely, two major patterns of esophageal routes could be depicted and are important for deciding the location of the ablation lesions around the PV ostia and LA and for avoiding the potential risk of esphageal injury.

104 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Less weekly exercise duration and weaker muscle strength were found to be independent risk factors of fall episode(s) in an elderly Taiwanese population, especially in the female sub-population.
Abstract: Fall episodes are not unusual among community residents, especially the elderly, and lower muscle strength is an important issue to address in order to prevent falls. A community health survey was conducted in a suburban area of Taiwan, and 1067 older adults were selected for enrollment in the present study. All the enrolled subjects had been visited at their homes; the subjects’ strength of both hands and muscle mass of both legs were measured and well-established questionnaires were finished by certificated paramedic staffs. The incidence of fall episodes in the previous 1 year in the Yilan elderly population was 15.1%, and the female predominance was significant. A significantly higher prevalence of cataracts was found in group who experienced a fall in the past year (64% vs. 54.9% in the non-fall group). Mild or more severe dementia was much more prevalent in the group who experienced a recent fall (33.8% vs. 25.7% in the non-fall group). The strength of both hands tested as the physical function was 17.6 ± 8.0 kg in the recent fall group, significantly weaker than that in the non-fall group (20.7 ± 8.7 kg). Multivariate regression analysis revealed a greater weekly exercise duration and greater strength of both hands reduced the occurrence of falls among the whole and the female population. The standardized effect sizes of hand grip strength between both groups, not trivial, were 0.29 and 0.37 for the total population and the female subpopulation respectively. Less weekly exercise duration and weaker muscle strength were f ound to be independent risk factors of fall episode(s) in an elderly Taiwanese population, especially in the female sub-population. Muscle strength, measured by average of both hands grip strength, was the most significantly factor of one-year fall episode(s) accessed retrospectively.

64 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2017-Sleep
TL;DR: Older adults with long sleep duration had weaker hand grip strength irrespective of muscle mass, suggesting that decreased muscle power may mediate or confound the relationship between longSleep duration and adverse health outcomes.
Abstract: Study objectives Different pathomechanisms may underlie the age-related decline in muscle mass and muscle power in older adults. This study aimed to examine the independent relationship between sleep duration and muscle power. Methods Older adults, aged 65 years and older, were randomly selected to participate in a community-based survey in Yilan city, Taiwan. Data on self-reported sleep duration, sociodemographic information, lifestyle, chronic medical and mental health conditions, sleep-related parameters, and anthropometric measurements were collected. Participants who slept ≤4 hr, 5 hr, 6-7 hr, 8 hr, and ≥9 hr were defined as shortest, short, mid-range, long, and longest sleepers, respectively. Muscle power was estimated using hand grip strength. Results A total of 1081 individuals participated. Their average age was 76.3 ± 6.1 years, and 59.4% were female. After controlling for covariates, including muscle mass of the upper extremities, both long (estimated mean [95% confidence interval, CI]: 19.2 [18.2-20.2], p = .03) and longest sleepers (estimated mean [95% CI]: 17.8 [16.4-19.2], p = .001) had weaker hand grip strength than mid-range sleepers (estimated mean [95% CI]: 20.9 [20.3-21.4]). When stratified by sex, the association between longest sleep duration and weaker hand grip strength was noted among men only. Conclusions Older adults with long sleep duration had weaker hand grip strength irrespective of muscle mass. This finding suggests that decreased muscle power may mediate or confound the relationship between long sleep duration and adverse health outcomes.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Sep 2014-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: Results suggest that cardiovascular disease and stroke have negative impacts on patient MCS and PCS through different underlying pathways, and support the proposition that different combinations of both physical and psychological support are necessary to best manage these diseases.
Abstract: Background Cardiovascular disease and stroke have emerged as substantial and growing health challenges to populations around the world. Besides for the survival and medical prognosis, how to improve the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) might also become one of the goals of treatment programs. There are multiple factors that influence HRQol, including comorbidity, mental function and lifestyle. However, substantial research and investigation have still not clarified these underlying pathways, which merit further attention. The purpose of this study was to determine how psychological factors affect the link between cardiovascular disease and stroke with HRQoL. Methods and Result A total of 1,285 elder subjects at least 65 years of age (47.2% male) were enrolled. The mental function and HRQol of each patient was then measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Short Form-12. After multiple regression analysis, anxiety, depression, cardiovascular disease, stroke, education level and age were shown to be associated with both mental component score (MCS) and physical component score (PCS). In the mediation analysis using the SPSS macro provided by Preacher and Hayes, cardiovascular disease and stroke affected HRQoL via anxiety and depression, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that cardiovascular disease and stroke have negative impacts on patient MCS and PCS through different underlying pathways. Cardiovascular disease influences the HRQoL both directly and indirectly with the mediation of anxiety, and stroke influences the HRQoL by way of depression. These findings support the proposition that different combinations of both physical and psychological support are necessary to best manage these diseases.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Compared with normal-weight individuals, overweight individuals had better mental HRQoL, SRH and happiness but underweight older people reported poorerSRH and obese reported poorer physical HRQOL but better mentalHRZoL and self-rated happiness.
Abstract: Previous findings on the associations between body mass index (BMI) and subjective health outcomes among older adults are inconsistent. The aims of this study were to explore the associations of BMI with health-related quality of life (HRQoL), self-rated health (SRH) and happiness among older adults. This study was part of the Yilan study, which was a community-based survey conducted in the Yilan city in Taiwan. A total of 3722 older adults were randomly recruited during 2012–2016. HRQoL was measured using the Short Form-12 Health Survey physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores and SRH and happiness were also evaluated. By hierarchical regression, after adjusting for covariates, compared with normal-weight participants, overweight did not have significantly different PCS scores (B = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.45 to 0.85, p = 0.546) but obese had significantly lower PCS scores (B = −0.97, 95% CI: −1.68 to −0.26, p < 0.0001); overweight and obese participants had significantly better MCS scores (B = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.40 to 1.61, p = 0.001 and B = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.60 to 1.88, p < 0.0001, respectively); overweight participants had significantly higher SRH scores (B = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.16 to 2.00, p = 0.022) but underweight had significantly lower SRH scores (B = −2.88, 95% CI: −4.81 to −0.95, p = 0.003); overweight and obese participants had better happiness scores (B = 1.55, 95% CI: 0.45 to 2.66, p = 0.006 and B = 1.68, 95% CI: 0.49 to 2.88, p = 0.006, respectively). In conclusion, compared with normal-weight individuals, overweight individuals had better mental HRQoL, SRH and happiness but underweight older people reported poorer SRH and obese reported poorer physical HRQOL but better mental HRQoL and self-rated happiness.

19 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2012-Europace
TL;DR: This 2012 Consensus Statement is to provide a state-of-the-art review of the field of catheter and surgical ablation of AF and to report the findings of a Task Force, convened by the Heart Rhythm Society, the European Heart Rhythm Association, and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society and charged with defining the indications, techniques, and outcomes of this procedure.
Abstract: During the past decade, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) has evolved rapidly from an investigational procedure to its current status as a commonly performed ablation procedure in many major hospitals throughout the world. Surgical ablation of AF, using either standard or minimally invasive techniques, is also performed in many major hospitals throughout the world. In 2007, an initial Consensus Statement on Catheter and Surgical AF Ablation was developed as a joint effort of the Heart Rhythm Society, the European Heart Rhythm Association, and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society.1 The 2007 document was also developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology. Since the publication of the 2007 document, there has been much learned about AF ablation, and the indications for these procedures have changed. Therefore the purpose of this 2012 Consensus Statement is to provide a state-of-the-art review of the field of catheter and surgical ablation of AF and to report the findings of a Task Force, convened by the Heart Rhythm Society, the European Heart Rhythm Association, and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society and charged with defining the indications, techniques, and outcomes of this procedure. Included within this document are recommendations pertinent to the design of clinical trials in the field of AF ablation, including definitions relevant to this topic. This statement summarizes the opinion of the Task Force members based on an extensive literature review as well as their own experience. It is directed to all health care professionals who are involved in the care of patients with AF, particularly those who are undergoing, or are being considered for, catheter or surgical ablation procedures for AF. This statement is not intended to recommend or promote catheter ablation of AF. Rather the ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient …

2,754 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on Catheter and Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, developed in partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), was published in this paper.

1,271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This is a report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on Catheter and Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, developed in partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA).
Abstract: This is a report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on Catheter and Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, developed in partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), and in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association (AHA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). This is endorsed by the governing bodies of the ACC Foundation, the AHA, the ECAS, the EHRA, the STS, the APHRS, and the HRS.

441 citations