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Najwa Nasr

Bio: Najwa Nasr is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Foreign language & Vocabulary. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 28 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors demonstrate how the analysis of the language of poetic selections could be the basis for TEFL lessons, using sample selections from the poetry of two Lebanese-American poets namely Ameen Rihani and Kahlil Gibran.
Abstract: In this paper, I demonstrate how the analysis of the language of poetic selections could be the basis for TEFL lessons. To illustrate, I use sample selections from the poetry of two Lebanese-American poets namely Ameen Rihani’s The Chant of Mystics and Gibran Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet. Nowadays, more arguments support the relevance of using literature to the teaching of a foreign language, and discuss the usefulness of the linguistic analysis of literature for pedagogical purposes. The New National Curriculum of Education put into effect in Lebanon beginning academic year 1998-1999 differs radically from the old one in methodology, approach, and distribution of cycles. The new curriculum adopts the content-based approach, which allows for the possibility of using literary texts as one source of content. My major focus in this paper is on the use of poetry in the secondary cycle of the Lebanese English curriculum. The poetic selections handled are rich in their vocabulary and structures, which allows for a variety of activities. Whether we are teaching a foreign language or even a native one, literature is a highly recommended vehicle for a number of reasons. In such cases, focus on the language paves the way for a meaningful and rewarding literary appreciation.

30 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of literature on how literature can be integrated as a language teaching material in EFL/ESL classes is presented, and five methodological models for teaching literature are proposed.
Abstract: This paper is a review of literature on how literature can be integrated as a language teaching material in EFL/ESL classes. First, it tracks down the place of literature in language classes from the early Grammar Translation Method (GTM) to Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) era. The paper then discusses the reasons for the demise and resurrection of literature as an input for language classes. After that the reasons for and against the use of literature in EFL/ESL classes are enumerated and discussed. For so doing, the researchers draw upon recent ideas on language teaching practice and theories. Finally in a practical move, this paper reviews the past and current approaches to teaching literature in language teaching classes. Five methodological models for teaching literature are proposed.

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the role of literature in the EFL university classroom can be found in this paper, where the authors discuss the reasons for the demise and resurrection of literature as an input for language classes.
Abstract: This article provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of literature in the EFL university classroom. After a brief historical overview of the question of using literature in the language classroom, the article discusses the reasons for the demise and resurrection of literature as an input for language classes. Right after that, the article deals with advantages and drawbacks of using literary texts as language tools by means of drawing on recent ideas on language teaching practice and theories. Finally, in a practical move, this paper depicts the past and current approaches to teaching literature in language teaching classes.

60 citations

01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of literature in the EFL/ESL classroom and elaborates on the bone of contention among foreign language educators in terms of whether or not literature has the capacity to enrich and enhance foreign language teaching and learning practices.
Abstract: This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of literature in the EFL/ESL classroom. Firstly, it sketches a brief history of literature’s association with and dissociation from first and second language programs from the 18th century on. Secondly, it elaborates on the bone of contention among foreign language educators in terms of whether or not literature has the capacity to enrich and enhance foreign language teaching and learning practices. To this end, the postulated pros and cons of using literature in the EFL/ESL classroom are presented. Finally, theoretical and empirical research is drawn upon to depict some of the ways literature can be and has been employed in the foreign language classroom.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors describes the disparity between the principles, guidelines, suggested themes, organization, methodology, classroom activities, and assessment outlined in the thematic, content-based English language curriculum adopted by the Lebanese government in 1997 and the classroom realities and other contextual factors that have hampered its proper implementation.
Abstract: This paper describes the disparity between the principles, guidelines, suggested themes, organization, methodology, classroom activities, and assessment outlined in the thematic, content-based English language curriculum adopted by the Lebanese government in 1997 and the classroom realities and other contextual factors that have hampered its proper implementation. The paper shows that the curriculum is designed in line with international ESL/EFL standards as it has clear goals, objectives, and performance indicators as well as sound perspectives on instruction, material selection and adaptation, and evaluation guidelines. These perspectives are based on widely accepted theoretical views in language acquisition and best practices in English language education. However, the content-based curriculum normally demands a high level of language proficiency and content and pedagogical knowledge from teachers, and it is highly dependent on the availability of adequate resources and ongoing professional development programs. The educational context in Lebanon still suffers the effects of the 1975-1990 civil war in these areas, which has made the implementation fraught with all sorts of problems.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue for the development of critical thinking in language learners as an important element in EFL classes and propose employing literary texts in reading comprehension classes, which can serve teachers tremendously to improve learners' critical thinking ability.
Abstract: The urge behind the current study was to argue for the development of critical thinking in language learners as an important element in EFL classes. A host of ways such as explicit teaching of critical thinking skills and using special programs have been hypothesized to improve learners' critical thinking ability. As a contribution to the current attempts to implant critical thinking in teaching and learning processes, the present study proposed employing literary texts in reading comprehension classes. To attain this goal, firstly, 34 learners were targeted as the participants of the study. Next, the pre-test of the study including a critical thinking test and a reading comprehension test was administered. Based on the results of the pretest, the participants were assigned into two homogeneous groups- experimental group and control group. Subsequently, both groups went through a 15-session reading comprehension course. The materials for the experimental group were literary texts extracted from different literary books and short stories. On the other hand, the materials for the control group were non-literary texts in the reading comprehension sections of books such as Interchange, Topnotch and Spectrum series. The same teaching method emphasizing critical thinking skills was used for teaching both groups. At the end of the course, a post-test including a critical thinking test and a reading comprehension test was administered to assess learners' critical thinking and reading comprehension. The findings of the study revealed that literary texts, as they require imaginative and creative thinking and are rich in reasoning and inference, can serve teachers tremendously to improve learners’ critical thinking ability. The results of the study have significant implications for teachers, researchers and material developers.

18 citations