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Naomi Josman

Bio: Naomi Josman is an academic researcher from University of Haifa. The author has contributed to research in topics: Occupational therapy & Construct validity. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 87 publications receiving 1693 citations. Previous affiliations of Naomi Josman include Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The VAP-S is a viable tool to assess EF deficits in patients with MCI and healthy elderly and the combination of the MMSE and the trajectory duration provided the best predictive classification for the groups.
Abstract: Background: Although executive functioning (EF) was found to be associated with cognitive deterioration, the majority of the tests for assessing EF lack ecological validity. Aims: To examine the feasibility and the validity of the virtual action planning supermarket (VAP-S) for the diagnosis of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Thirty MCI patients (mean age = 69.5 years) were compared to 30 healthy elderly persons (mean age = 69.2 years) in their performance of the VAP-S. Results: Significant differences were found between the groups in the majority of the measures of the VAP-S. The combination of the MMSE and the trajectory duration provided the best predictive classification for the groups. Conclusion: MCI patients have EF deficits, and the VAP-S is a viable tool to assess EF deficits in patients with MCI and healthy elderly.

103 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that when seeking a suitable VR therapeutic application, the user's characteristics together with attributes of the VR platform must be taken into consideration since both appear to have an impact on key outcome measures.
Abstract: In recent years, clinical studies have begun to demonstrate the effectiveness of VR as an intervention tool for a variety of neurological conditions. There remain, however, a number of important issues that must be addressed in order to determine how widely VR-based intervention should be applied, and the user and platform characteristics that may be important when using VR in clinical settings. One of the unresolved issues that must be addressed is the suitability of particular VR platforms in relation to the therapeutic goals one wishes to achieve. Studying and identifying the characteristics of each platform may assist the therapist in choosing a suitable VR platform for the patient's needs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a study of healthy participants (N -- 89) using 2 different VR platforms in combination with 1 of the 2 virtual environments that was designed to compare the sense of presence, incidence of side effects, perceived exertion, and performance. The data demonstrate significant differences in some of the key characteristics of both VR platforms and environments as they affect participants' sense of presence, performance, side effects, and exertion. We conclude that when seeking a suitable VR therapeutic application, the user's characteristics together with attributes of the VR platform must be taken into consideration since both appear to have an impact on key outcome measures.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Significant differences were found between the groups for handwriting performance (HHE) and organizational abilities (QASOA-P), and study results strongly recommend assessing organizational difficulties in children referred for therapy due to handwriting deficiency.

74 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of this study support the use of the Virtual Action Planning-Supermarket to assess EF among persons with Schizophrenia.

72 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current "state of the art" for virtual reality (VR) applications in the field of motor rehabilitation is reviewed and movements learned by people with disabilities in VR transfer to real world equivalent motor tasks in most cases, and in some cases even generalize to other untrained tasks.
Abstract: In this paper, the current "state of the art" for virtual reality (VR) applications in the field of motor rehabilitation is reviewed. The paper begins with a brief overview of available equipment options. Next, a discussion of the scientific rationale for use of VR in motor rehabilitation is provided. Finally, the major portion of the paper describes the various VR systems that have been developed for use with patients, and the results of clinical studies reported to date in the literature. Areas covered include stroke rehabilitation (upper and lower extremity training, spatial and perceptual-motor training), acquired brain injury, Parkinson's disease, orthopedic rehabilitation, balance training, wheelchair mobility and functional activities of daily living training, and the newly developing field of telerehabilitation. Four major findings emerge from these studies: (1) people with disabilities appear capable of motor learning within virtual environments; (2) movements learned by people with disabilities in VR transfer to real world equivalent motor tasks in most cases, and in some cases even generalize to other untrained tasks; (3) in the few studies (n = 5) that have compared motor learning in real versus virtual environments, some advantage for VR training has been found in all cases; and (4) no occurrences of cybersickness in impaired populations have been reported to date in experiments where VR has been used to train motor abilities.

1,094 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current meta-analysis synthesizes decades of empirical research examining the effect of immersive system technology on user experiences of presence and finds that technological immersion has a medium-sized effect on presence.
Abstract: The concept of presence, or “being there” is a frequently emphasized factor in immersive mediated environments. It is often assumed that greater levels of immersive quality elicit higher levels of presence, in turn enhancing the effectiveness of a mediated experience. To investigate this assumption the current meta-analysis synthesizes decades of empirical research examining the effect of immersive system technology on user experiences of presence. Aggregating 115 effect sizes from 83 studies, it finds that technological immersion has a medium-sized effect on presence. Additionally, results show that increased levels of user-tracking, the use of stereoscopic visuals, and wider fields of view of visual displays are significantly more impactful than improvements to most other immersive system features, including quality of visual and auditory content. These findings are discussed in light of theoretical accounts of the presence construct as well as practical implications for design.

836 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2005

719 citations