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Naoum Tsolakis

Bio: Naoum Tsolakis is an academic researcher from University of Cambridge. The author has contributed to research in topics: Supply chain & Sustainability. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 55 publications receiving 817 citations. Previous affiliations of Naoum Tsolakis include Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive hierarchical decision-making framework and a critical taxonomy that apply to all stakeholders involved in the design and management of efficient agrifood supply chains.

207 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present study provides a critical taxonomy of key decisions for facilitating the adoption of AGV systems into SC design and planning, as these are mapped on the relevant strategic, tactical and operational levels of the natural hierarchy.

158 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the design of blockchain-centric food supply chains that promote sustainable development goals, within the context of the Thai fish industry, is studied. But, there is limited understanding over data structure requirements for blockchain technology implementation in digitally-enabled food supply chain.

107 citations

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TL;DR: A framework that captures the main software architecture elements for developing highly customised simulation tools that support the effective integration of Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles in sustainable supply networks, as an emerging field in the operations management agenda is provided.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a critical literature synthesis concerning product water footprint assessment in order to map the state-of-the-art research related to freshwater consumption and pollution in the agricultural and industrial sectors.

71 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI

1,610 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a systematic analysis of the sustainability functions of Industry 4.0, including energy sustainability, harmful emission reduction, and social welfare improvement, and show that sophisticated precedence relationships exist among various sustainability functions.

664 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a framework for understanding the effects of automation and other types of technological changes on labor demand, and use it to interpret changes in US employment over the recent past.
Abstract: We present a framework for understanding the effects of automation and other types of technological changes on labor demand, and use it to interpret changes in US employment over the recent past. At the center of our framework is the allocation of tasks to capital and labor—the task content of production. Automation, which enables capital to replace labor in tasks it was previously engaged in, shifts the task content of production against labor because of a displacement effect. As a result, automation always reduces the labor share in value added and may reduce labor demand even as it raises productivity. The effects of automation are counterbalanced by the creation of new tasks in which labor has a comparative advantage. The introduction of new tasks changes the task content of production in favor of labor because of a reinstatement effect, and always raises the labor share and labor demand. We show how the role of changes in the task content of production—due to automation and new tasks—can be inferred from industry-level data. Our empirical decomposition suggests that the slower growth of employment over the last three decades is accounted for by an acceleration in the displacement effect, especially in manufacturing, a weaker reinstatement effect, and slower growth of productivity than in previous decades.

537 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify key challenges to Industry 4.0 initiatives and analyze the identified key challenges in order to prioritize them for effective Industry4.0 concepts for supply chain sustainability in emerging economies.

503 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Apr 2016
TL;DR: Marshall has unique expertise in leveraging new digital tools, 3D printing, and other advanced manufacturing technologies and applying them to propulsion systems design and other aerospace materials to meet NASA mission and industry needs.
Abstract: Propulsion system development requires new, more affordable manufacturing techniques and technologies in a constrained budget environment, while future in-space applications will require in-space manufacturing and assembly of parts and systems. Marshall is advancing cuttingedge commercial capabilities in additive and digital manufacturing and applying them to aerospace challenges. The Center is developing the standards by which new manufacturing processes and parts will be tested and qualified. Rapidly evolving digital tools, such as additive manufacturing, are the leading edge of a revolution in the design and manufacture of space systems that enables rapid prototyping and reduces production times. Marshall has unique expertise in leveraging new digital tools, 3D printing, and other advanced manufacturing technologies and applying them to propulsion systems design and other aerospace materials to meet NASA mission and industry needs. Marshall is helping establish the standards and qualifications “from art to part” for the use of these advanced techniques and the parts produced using them in aerospace or elsewhere in the U.S. industrial base.

481 citations