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Nataliia Cherkas

Bio: Nataliia Cherkas is an academic researcher from Kyiv National Economic University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Entrepreneurship & Business. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 14 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
08 Mar 2021-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed and tested a model of multi-dimensional institutional arrangements in cities to examine the role that institutional context plays in facilitating the productive entrepreneurship and reducing the unproductive entrepreneurship and found that differences between normative, cognitive, and regulatory pillars are associated with variance in both types of entrepreneurship in cities.
Abstract: Entrepreneurship activity varies significantly across cities. We use the novel data for 1,652 ecosystem actors across sixteen cities in nine developing and transition economies during 2018–2019 to examine the role that institutional context plays in facilitating the productive entrepreneurship and reducing the unproductive entrepreneurship. This study is the first to develop and test a model of multi-dimensional institutional arrangements in cities. It demonstrates that not just that institutions matter in shaping the entrepreneurship ecosystem in cities, but in particular those institutional arrangements enhancing the productive and reducing unproductive entrepreneurship. Our findings suggest that differences between normative, cognitive, and regulatory pillars are associated with variance in both types of entrepreneurship in cities. For the formation of productive and high-growth entrepreneurs, all three pillars of institutional arrangement matter. For unproductive entrepreneurship normative pillar of institutions and the role of civil society matter most. This study has theoretical and practical implications for entrepreneurship ecosystem policy in cities.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide an analysis of factors contributing to value added at macro level in different European countries, including a panel framework covering 27 European countries over the period 2006-2015.
Abstract: In conditions of globalization and rapidly growing production fragmentation, generation of value added becomes an ultimate goal and a measure of economic performance. The study provides an analysis of factors contributing to value added at macro level in different European countries. The analysis includes a panel framework covering 27 European countries over the period 2006–2015. In order to investigate the differences across regions, three subsamples are considered, namely, developed economies, PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain) and Central-Eastern European Countries (CEEC). Pooled OLS, fixed effects and random effects models are used. The results indicate that increase of value added corresponds to budget discipline, quality of human capital improvement, strong currency and transparent institutions. It could be expected that currency depreciation improves performance of the value added of exported final goods. However, the results show the opposite evidence: currency depreciation causes the value added decrease in all groups. Thus, for transitional countries, it is im¬portant not only to join global production chains, but also to acquire a significant share in generation of value added in these chains based on technological changes.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors examine the entrepreneurship ecosystem, which is built on the bottom-up principles, to understand whether its pillars can facilitate productive entrepreneurship in two Ukrainian regions shaken by multiple revolutions and regime change.
Abstract: Abstract Entrepreneurship is a productive force of innovation and economic development. However, in post-conflict regions, there is a greater challenge in allocating entrepreneurial talent to productive entrepreneurship. In this study, we examine the entrepreneurship ecosystem, which is built on the “bottom-up” principles to understand whether its pillars can facilitate productive entrepreneurship in two Ukrainian regions shaken by multiple revolutions and regime change. We introduce a model that puts entrepreneurial conditions in cities and formal institutional changes to a competitive test. Building on the regional entrepreneurship literature, we perform an empirical study in a developing country to reveal what drives productive entrepreneurship in post-conflict regions with entrepreneurship culture, formal networks, debt and equity financing emerging as important determinants of productive entrepreneurship. The effect of formal institutions is significant but highly correlated with rent-seeking behavior of government and corruption. Our analysis suggests that the entrepreneurial conditions in regions focusing on the bottom-up processes of supporting entrepreneurship should work better to enhance productive entrepreneurship activity in a post-conflict region.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a 4.0 version of the 4.1 version of their paper, which they call the "4.0 edition" of the paper.
Abstract: Розкрито особливості трансформаційного впливу Індустрії 4.0 на цифрові екосистеми у межах глобальних мереж виробництва. Проаналізовано напрями горизонтального та вертикального оцифрування ланцюгів вартості компаній на шляху до цифрового лідерства та інтегрованої екосистеми. Розроблено матрицю мережевої готовності та доданої вартості у промисловості країн Європи.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors explored entrepreneurial determinants for public-sector innovation, as collected from managers and employees involved in the water supply and sewage industries in Ukraine and found that entrepreneurial leadership and intrapreneurial self-efficacy are mediating determinants.
Abstract: The importance of innovation, in both private and public entrepreneurial fields, is the basis of all companies’ strategic choices. This study examines entrepreneurship and innovation, as well as their dynamic interface in value creation, in the public sector. It explores entrepreneurial determinants for public-sector innovation, as collected from managers and employees involved in the water supply and sewage industries in Ukraine. The data, related to a sample of firms, were obtained from a twofold self-administered survey. Adopting an ordered logistic regression model to analyse the data obtained from a survey, it is found that the entrepreneurial determinants of self-awareness, knowledge-enabling and entrepreneurial orientation positively correlate with fostering innovation process. The findings reveal that entrepreneurial leadership and intrapreneurial self-efficacy are mediating determinants. Finally, the results demonstrate that intrapreneurial self-efficacy has more potential than entrepreneurial leadership to stimulate innovation at the individual level, which has both theoretical and practical implications.

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Book
01 Jan 2009

8,216 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A systematic review of the literature on the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on entrepreneurship and small businesses can be found in this paper, with a discussion of four literature strands based on this review and an overview of contributions in this special issue.
Abstract: The existential threat to small businesses, based on their crucial role in the economy, is behind the plethora of scholarly studies in 2020, the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Examining the 15 contributions of the special issue on the “Economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on entrepreneurship and small businesses,” the paper comprises four parts: a systematic review of the literature on the effect on entrepreneurship and small businesses; a discussion of four literature strands based on this review; an overview of the contributions in this special issue; and some ideas for post-pandemic economic research.

116 citations

16 Mar 2014
TL;DR: In this article, the authors claim that in an attempt to manage the economic opportunities and threats that East Central Europe posed after the regime change, the EU has actively shaped foreign capital inflows to the region.
Abstract: East Central Europe's (ECE) recent record in accumulating FDI stock is notable even from a global perspective. While most scholarly works downplay the role of the European Union (EU) in this process, this article claims that in an attempt to manage the economic opportunities and threats that ECE posed after the regime change, the EU has actively shaped foreign capital inflows to the region. First, the EU triggered a liberal shift in ECE's FDI policies. Second, after enlargement, the EU has reinforced ECE's locational advantages through its practice of approving most of the incentive schemes offered to foreign investors. While investors mainly coming from the old EU Members began to dominate ECE economies, the region's heavy reliance on FDI has also produced a reverse effect: ECE investments have enhanced the global competitiveness of western European firms. To a certain extent, FDI has therefore transcended the traditional east–west divide.

64 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of tax policy and corruption on necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship depends on government size, corruption, and tax policy can influence allocating towards necessity or opportunity-driven entrepreneurship.
Abstract: Government size, corruption, and tax policy can influence allocation towards necessity or opportunity-driven entrepreneurship. Using a comparative multi-source sample across 52 countries during 2005–2015, we apply a mixed-process estimation of the simultaneously unrelated system of equations and unpack these heterogeneous and complex effects. Interestingly, our results show that the influence of tax policy and corruption on necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship depends on government size. Our results hold for numerous robustness analyses. Institutions matter for the choice of opportunity and necessity-driven entrepreneurship. Government size, the level of corruption, and tax policy directly affect entrepreneurs’ motivation and incentives. We study 52 countries during 2005–2015 to find out to what extent tax rate, corruption, and a range of government expenditure change the allocation of necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship. Our main implications are for (1) Research: Formal and informal institutions need to be considered when studying entrepreneurship allocation, particularly in an emerging and developing country context. Results suggest that the impact of the same institutional settings and informal institutions such as corruption on necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship is not uniform in size and scope and have different magnitude. The effect of government expenditure on necessity and opportunity entrepreneurship is not ubiquitous. (2) Management: The broader institutional context affects allocation of entrepreneurship, and potential entrepreneurs can consider how corruption in particular can affect them. (3) Policy: Policymakerscan measure the extent to which opportunity and necessity entrepreneurship are likely to change, when they make changes to tax policy, resources for public spending, and take anti-corruption measures.

27 citations