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Nicholas A. Turiano

Bio: Nicholas A. Turiano is an academic researcher from West Virginia University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Personality & Big Five personality traits. The author has an hindex of 23, co-authored 62 publications receiving 2154 citations. Previous affiliations of Nicholas A. Turiano include University of Virginia & University of Rochester.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Having a purpose in life appears to widely buffer against mortality risk across the adult years, using data from the longitudinal Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) sample.
Abstract: Having a purpose in life has been cited consistently as an indicator of healthy aging for several reasons, including its potential for reducing mortality risk. In the current study, we sought to extend previous findings by examining whether purpose in life promotes longevity across the adult years, using data from the longitudinal Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) sample. Proportional-hazards models demonstrated that purposeful individuals lived longer than their counterparts did during the 14 years after the baseline assessment, even when controlling for other markers of psychological and affective well-being. Moreover, these longevity benefits did not appear to be conditional on the participants' age, how long they lived during the follow-up period, or whether they had retired from the workforce. In other words, having a purpose in life appears to widely buffer against mortality risk across the adult years.

323 citations

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TL;DR: Findings demonstrate that a full understanding of the link between personality and health requires consideration of trait change as well as trait level.
Abstract: PERSONALITY traits have emerged in recent years as predictors of important health outcomes (Hampson & Friedman, 2008). For example, high neuroticism and low conscientiousness are each associated with earlier mortality (Friedman et al., 1993; Wilson, Mendes de Leon, Bienas, Evans, & Bennett, 2004). However, a small number of recent studies demonstrated that not only does personality level predict key health outcomes but so does personality change (Roberts & Mroczek, 2008). Prior studies highlight the importance of considering both trait level and change to predict outcomes as diverse as substance abuse (Hampson, Tildesley, Andrews, Luckyx, & Mroczek, 2010), obesity (Siegler et al., 2003), and mortality (Mroczek & Spiro, 2007). No study, however, has used a large national sample with a wide age range to examine whether both personality level and change predict health outcomes. In the present study, we extend the findings of these prior investigations using the Midlife in the U.S. (MIDUS) survey, a large national longitudinal sample of adult Americans to determine whether personality trait level and change independently predict three distinct self-reported health outcomes.

232 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The findings suggest, consistent with prior speculation, that average to higher levels of Neuroticism can in some cases be associated with health benefits - in this case when it is accompanied by high Conscientiousness.
Abstract: The current study investigated if the Big 5 personality traits predicted interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in a national sample over the course of 5 years. In addition, interactions among the Big 5 were tested to provide a more accurate understanding of how personality traits may influence an inflammatory biomarker. Data included 1054 participants in the Midlife Development in the U.S. (MIDUS) biomarkers subproject. The Big 5 personality traits were assessed in 2005–2006 as part of the main MIDUS survey. Medication use, comorbid conditions, smoking behavior, alcohol use, body mass index, and serum levels of IL-6 were assessed in 2005–2009 as part of the biomarkers subproject. Linear regression analyses examined personality associations with IL-6. A significant ConscientiousnessNeuroticism interaction revealed that those high in both Conscientiousness and Neuroticism had lower circulating IL-6 levels than people with all other configurations of Conscientiousness and Neuroticism. Adjustment for health behaviors diminished the magnitude of this association but did not eliminate it, suggesting that lower comorbid conditions and obesity may partly explain the lower inflammation of those high in both Conscientiousness and Neuroticism. Our findings suggest, consistent with prior speculation, that average to higher levels of Neuroticism can in some cases be associated with health benefits – in this case when it is accompanied by high Conscientiousness. Using personality to identify those at risk may lead to greater personalization in the prevention and remediation of chronic inflammation.

173 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Personality, trait change, and interactions among traits reliably forecasted 10-year substance-use behaviors and higher levels of conscientiousness moderated two of the other trait main effects.

155 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An index of emotional reactivity, defined as changes in positive or negative affect in response to daily stressors, was used to predict 10-year survival to highlight the potential importance of dynamic aspects of positive affect in prediction of physical health outcomes such as mortality.
Abstract: Objectives. Evidence suggests a predictive association between emotion and mortality risk. However, no study has examined dynamic aspects of emotion in relation to mortality. This study used an index of emotional reactivity, defined as changes in positive or negative affect in response to daily stressors, to predict 10-year survival. Methods. An 8-day daily diary study was conducted in 2002 on 181 men aged 58–88. Multilevel models were employed to estimate emotional reactivity coefficients, which were subsequently entered into a Cox proportional hazards model to predict mortality.

130 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 2001-JAMA

1,258 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions).
Abstract: Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory.

965 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hypotheses about mean-level age differences in the Big Five personality domains, as well as 10 more specific facet traits within those domains, were tested in a very large cross-sectional sample of children, adolescents, and adults assessed over the World Wide Web.
Abstract: Hypotheses about mean-level age differences in the Big Five personality domains, as well as 10 more specific facet traits within those domains, were tested in a very large cross-sectional sample (N = 1,267,218) of children, adolescents, and adults (ages 10-65) assessed over the World Wide Web. The results supported several conclusions. First, late childhood and adolescence were key periods. Across these years, age trends for some traits (a) were especially pronounced, (b) were in a direction different from the corresponding adult trends, or (c) first indicated the presence of gender differences. Second, there were some negative trends in psychosocial maturity from late childhood into adolescence, whereas adult trends were overwhelmingly in the direction of greater maturity and adjustment. Third, the related but distinguishable facet traits within each broad Big Five domain often showed distinct age trends, highlighting the importance of facet-level research for understanding life span age differences in personality.

881 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This application applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence will help people to enjoy a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon instead of juggling with some harmful bugs inside their desktop computer.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence. As you may know, people have search hundreds times for their chosen novels like this applied longitudinal data analysis modeling change and event occurrence, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some harmful bugs inside their desktop computer.

822 citations