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Nicole Amare

Other affiliations: University of Alabama
Bio: Nicole Amare is an academic researcher from University of South Alabama. The author has contributed to research in topics: Technical communication & Professional communication. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 35 publications receiving 404 citations. Previous affiliations of Nicole Amare include University of Alabama.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance and attitudes of technical writing students in PowerPoint-enhanced and in non-PowerPoint lectures were analyzed, and it was found that while most students preferred PowerPoint, performance scores were higher in the sections with the traditional lecture format.
Abstract: This study analyzes the performance and attitudes of technical writing students in PowerPoint-enhanced and in non-PowerPoint lectures. Four classes of upper-level undergraduates (n = 84) at a mid-sized, Southern university taking a one-semester technical writing course were surveyed at the beginning and end of the course about their perceptions of PowerPoint. Of the four sections, two classes were instructed using traditional lecture materials (teacher at podium, chalkboard, handouts); the other two sections were instructed with PowerPoint presentations. All four classes were given the same pre- and post-test to measure performance over the course of the semester. Traditional lecture or PowerPoint presentations consisted of at least 50% of the course, with the remaining time spent on exercises and small group work. Results reveal that while most students say they preferred PowerPoint, performance scores were higher in the sections with the traditional lecture format.

92 citations

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TL;DR: Service-Learning in technical and professional communication educators will appreciate the layout of the text, the authors’ conversational tone, and the various samples to illustrate points, but the book is sometimes burdened with unnecessary academic rhetoric and misguided placement of information.
Abstract: Melody Bowden and J. Blake Scott’s Service-Learning in Technical and Professional Communication employs the “writing process” approach to undergraduate students taking their first service-learning course. Bowden and Scott have managed to create a user-friendly textbook, full of easy-to-follow student examples. Professional and technical communication educators will appreciate the layout of the text, the authors’ conversational tone, and the various samples to illustrate points. However, the book is sometimes burdened with unnecessary academic rhetoric and misguided placement of information—a problem that could have easily been fixed with the reorganization of chapters—and overuse of text instead of graphics.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Any evaluation of visuals, either textual or graphic, must be made with reference to rhetorical contexts in which audience needs and graphic/textual media choices should align with authorial goals.
Abstract: Technical communication textbooks tend to address visual rhetoric as two separate units, usually a chapter on document design and then a chapter on graphics. We advocate teaching a unified system of visual rhetoric that encompasses both text and graphics within a common visual-language system. Using C. S. Peirce's three-part theory of rhetoric and his ten categories of sign, we offer an integrated semiotic system, interpreting in one model the effectiveness of graphics, document design, and formatting, all considered as subtypes in this proposed visual rhetoric, organized around three primary communication goals: to decorate, to indicate, and to inform. Thus, any evaluation of visuals, either textual or graphic, must be made with reference to rhetorical contexts in which audience needs and graphic/textual media choices should align with authorial goals

40 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors examined seven online grammar guides for instances of linguistic sexism and found 3,020 occurrences of gendered language in these guides and analyzed them based on gender-fair language criteria such as gender stereotypes, firstness, and male-to-female ratio.
Abstract: This article examines seven online grammar guides for instances of linguistic sexism. The grammar sentences from .edu Websites were analyzed based on NCTE's "Guidelines for Gender-Fair Use of Language" (2002) using the criteria of generic he and man; titles, labels, and names; gender stereotypes; order of mention (firstness); and ratio of male to female. Of the 3,220 sentences analyzed, 3,020 occurrences of gendered language were found and were analyzed based on gender-fair language criteria. All seven university-affiliated websites contained some occurrences of linguistic sexism; generic "he" and "man" were less of a problem than firstness and male-tofemale ratio.1 Although the raw numbers reveal that the overall instances of linguistic sexism were relatively rare, it is interesting to note the ways in which linguistic sexism persisted in these grammar exercises. Implications of linguistic sexism for users of online academic texts are highlighted. Because sexist language was present in these online grammar guides, writing teachers are encouraged to discuss with their students and with each other why linguistic sexism may occur in such sites and what we can do to prevent and eliminate linguistic sexism more effectively in our own texts and lives, particularly with regard to gender stereotypes, firstness, and maleto -female ratios.

26 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the design process of five Dutch firms and the cultural and communicative implications of cooperation in design process between the supplier and the customer using EC media.
Abstract: Innovation in a company's design process is increasingly a matter of cooperation between the company and its customers. New information and communication technology (ICT) possibilities such as electronic communication (EC) media generate even more opportunities for companies to collaborate with customers during the early stages of research and development. This exploratory study examined the design process of five Dutch firms and the cultural and communicative implications of cooperation in the design process between the supplier and the customer using EC media. We found that the selected use of EC media for communication between R&D and customers has a positive effect on the design process. We also discovered that the characteristics of the most suitable EC media depend on the design activity and that the corporate and professional cultures of both the company and its customers involved in the cooperation seem to affect the communication media used. Finally, the future use of new ICT in the design area is discussed.

23 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Fish as discussed by the authors argues that while we can never separate our judgments from the contexts in which they are made, those judgments are nevertheless authoritative and even, in the only way that matters, objective.
Abstract: In literary theory, the philosophy of law, and the sociology of knowledge, no issue has been more central to current debate than the status of our interpretations. Do they rest on a ground of rationality or are they subjective impositions of a merely personal point of view? In \"Doing What Comes Naturally,\" Stanley Fish refuses the dilemma posed by this question and argues that while we can never separate our judgments from the contexts in which they are made, those judgments are nevertheless authoritative and even, in the only way that matters, objective. He thus rejects both the demand for an ahistorical foundation, and the conclusion that in the absence of such a foundation we reside in an indeterminate world. In a succession of provocative and wide-ranging chapters, Fish explores the implications of his position for our understanding of legal, literary, and psychoanalytic interpretation, the nature of professional and institutional culture, and the place of reason in a world that is rhetorical through and through.

485 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This slim, thoughtful, and disturbing volume is a mere 58 pages of direct, insistent, pellucid prose and can be read in one hour, and may well be the greatest literary bargain of an inflated publishing age.
Abstract: Last year's Rede Lecture at Cambridge by C. P. Snow is now available in a slim, thoughtful, and disturbing volume entitled The Two Cultures and The Scientific Revolution . It runs a mere 58 pages of direct, insistent, pellucid prose and can be read in one hour. Since it takes so little time to courageously tackle two problems vital to scientists, and since it is modestly priced, this unimposing book may well be the greatest literary bargain of an inflated publishing age. The "two cultures" in the title are the modern culture of the scientific intellectual and the traditional culture of the literary intellectual. With a foot in each cultural camp, C. P. Snow comes uniquely armed to the fray. He states his own qualifications: "by training I was a scientist; by vocation I was a writer." More specifically, Charles Percy Snow, the scientist, won his M. A. in physics in

276 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Investigation of the phonological length of utterance in native Kannada speaking children of 3 to 7 years age revealed increase inPMLU score as the age increased suggesting a developmental trend in PMLU acquisition.
Abstract: Phonological mean length of utterance (PMLU) is a whole word measure for measuring phonological proficiency. It measures the length of a child’s word and the number of correct consonants. The present study investigated the phonological length of utterance in native Kannada speaking children of 3 to 7 years age. A total of 400 subjects in the age range of 3-7 years participated in the study. Spontaneous speech samples were elicited from each child and analyzed for PMLU as per the rules suggested by Ingram. Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal Wallis test were employed to compare the differences between the means of PMLU scores across the gender and the age respectively. The result revealed increase in PMLU score as the age increased suggesting a developmental trend in PMLU acquisition. No statistically significant differences were observed between the means of PMLU scores across the gender.

230 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Viewing personnel selection as a network of adaptive relationships among job market actors enables an understanding of both classic and underexplored micro- and macro-level selection phenomena and their dynamic interactions.
Abstract: Personnel selection involves exchanges of information between job market actors (applicants and organizations). These actors do not have an incentive to exchange accurate information about their ability and commitment to the employment relationship unless it is to their advantage. This state of affairs explains numerous phenomena in personnel selection (e.g., faking). Signaling theory describes a mechanism by which parties with partly conflicting interests (and thus an incentive for deception) can nevertheless exchange accurate information. We apply signaling theory to personnel selection, distinguishing between adaptive relationships between applicants and organizations, among applicants, and among organizations. In each case, repeated adaptations and counteradaptations between actors can lead to situations of equilibrium or escalation (arms races). We show that viewing personnel selection as a network of adaptive relationships among job market actors enables an understanding of both classic and underexplored micro- and macro-level selection phenomena and their dynamic interactions.

203 citations