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Nizar F. Hermes

Bio: Nizar F. Hermes is an academic researcher from University of Virginia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Arabic literature & Chivalry. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 10 publications receiving 38 citations.

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27 Mar 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, Beyond)fore Orientalism: Medieval Muslims and the Other: Re-Drawing the Essentialist Boundaries Translation, Travel, and Other: The Fascination with Greek and Oriental Cultures European Barbarity and Civilization in some Medieval Arabic Geographical Sources: Al-Masudi and al-Bakri as Two Case Studies Writing the North: Europe and Europeans in Medieval Arabic Travel Literature Poetry, Frontiers, and Alterity: Views and Perceptions of al-Rum (Byzantines) and Al-Ifranja (Crusaders
Abstract: Introduction: Be(yond)fore Orientalism: Medieval Muslims and the Other: Re-Drawing the Essentialist Boundaries Translation, Travel, and the Other: The Fascination with Greek and Oriental Cultures European Barbarity and Civilization in some Medieval Arabic Geographical Sources: Al-Mas?udi and al-Bakri as Two Case Studies Writing the North: Europe and Europeans in Medieval Arabic Travel Literature Poetry, Frontiers, and Alterity: Views and Perceptions of al-Rum (Byzantines) and al-Ifranja (Crusaders)

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors re-visit Cervantes' views of Islam and Muslims and explore the not yet duly studied possible Arabic influence on Don Quixote, by comparing, for the first time in Cervantine scholarship, the Moorish tale (i.e., "The Captive's Tale") to the Frankish tale known alternatively as "Princess Miriam the Girdle-girl, daughter of the King of France" and "The Love Tale of Ali Nur al-Din the Cairene and Princess Mariam, Daughter of the
Abstract: In Don Quixote: A Touchstone for Literary Criticism (2005), distinguished Cervantine scholar James A. Parr does not seem to go too far when he hails Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (1605-1615)--hereafter Don Quixote--as the perfect model of a "pivotal text" that is "prescient in its formulation of the strategies of the self-conscious, self-questioning, and other experimental and historical texts of our time" (6). Indeed, in addition to its superlative literary merit and fictional uniqueness, Don Quixote is historically and culturally rich. This is very much true, for example, of the text's distinctively complex dramatization of the early modern encounter between Europe and Islam. This encounter, of course historically speaking, was primarily embodied in the conflict between Habsburg Spain and the Ottoman Empire, then Europe's and the Islamic world's two leading powers. (2) Although the Spanish-Ottoman rivalry was performed in different territorial and, mainly, maritime battlegrounds--the Battle of Lepanto (1571) looms large in this regard--the textual ones were not less significant and Don Quixote is a compelling textual illustration. (3) In growing numbers, scholars are arguing that the "contact zone," between Europe and Islam is textually and contextually very detectable throughout the works of Cervantes. (4) "Islam," to quote Frederick Quinn's The Sum of All Heresies: The Image of Islam in Western Thought (2008), "was a topic not only in French and English political, religious, and cultural writings but also was the focus of a major seventeenth-century Spanish writer, Miguel de Cervantes" (83). While a fair amount of ink has been spilled on the Islamic theme, and that of Algiers in particular, in works such as Los Bagnos de Argel (The Bagnios of Algiers), Los Tratos de Alger (The Traffic of Algiers), El Galardo Espanol (The Gallant Spaniard) and La Gran Sultana (The Grand Sultana), there still exits a lacuna when it comes to exploring Cervantes' complex representation of Islam and his attitude towards the Arabo-Islamic cultural heritage in his magnum opus. Through addressing what I see as Cervantes' reference to the medieval propaganda myth of "the idol Mahomet," his literary transfiguration of the early modern subversive phenomenon of the conversion to Islam, and his ambiguous feelings towards the Arabian historian Cide Hamete Benengeli, I will re-visit Cervantes' views of Islam and Muslims. I will, further, explore--again, what I see as--the not yet duly studied possible Arabic influence on Don Quixote. I will do so by comparing, for the first time in Cervantine scholarship, the Moorish tale (i.e., "The Captive's Tale") to the Arabian Alf Layla wa- Layla's Frankish tale known alternatively as "Princess Miriam the Girdle-girl, Daughter of the King of France" and "The Love Tale of Ali Nur al-Din the Cairene and Princess Mariam, Daughter of the King of France." I will finally, albeit briefly, draw attention to the Arabic maqama genre whose features and motifs bear some striking similarities to some of the salient narratological and structural aspects of Don Quixote. The hope is to stir further interest and future research on the possible (in)direct influence of the Arabic maqama genre on Don Quixote. (5) It is "universally acknowledged" that Don Quixote is introduced at the beginning of the narrative as an obsessive reader of romances of chivalry and a zealous admirer of Christian knights. "In short," we are told, "our gentleman became so caught up in reading that he spent his nights from dusk till dawn and his days reading from sunrise to sunset" (21). In his seemingly never-ending disputes with his entourage, specifically the learned curate of the parish and the connoisseur Master Nicholas, barber of La Mancha, he prides himself on fervently defending the valor of his favorite knights Amadis de Gaula, El Cid Ruy Diaz, Bernardo del Carpio, (6) giant Morgante, and Reinaldos de Montalban. …

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors turn their attention to al-Ghassani's (d. 1707) Riḥlat al-wazīr fī iftikāki al-asīr (The Journey of the Minister to Ransom the Captive) to trace some of the most original and thought-provoking literary and cultural manifestations of nostalgic/elegiac depictions of al-Andalus in Arabic-Islamic writing in the post-Reconquista era.
Abstract: The present article proposes that we turn our attention to al-Ghassānī’s (d. 1707) Riḥlat al-wazīr fī iftikāki al-asīr (The Journey of the Minister to Ransom the Captive) to trace some of the most original and thought-provoking literary and cultural manifestations of nostalgic/elegiac depictions of al-Andalus in Arabic-Islamic writing in the post-Reconquista era. Riḥlat al-wazīr fī iftikāki al-asīr, the article argues, abounds with tropes and motifs typical of neoclassical and modern Arabic Andalusiyyāt. This is especially true of the section that records the author's physical encounter with al-Andalus. Finally, the essay makes the case for additional scholarly exploration of the themes of memory, loss, and nostalgia in other early modern Moroccan Voyages en Espagne.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the life and career of forgotten Levantine poet Ibn al-Qaysarānī (d. 1154) and explored his largely obscure poetic legacy, especially his fascinating Ifranjiyyāt (Poems on...
Abstract: In this article, I examine the life and career of forgotten Levantine poet Ibn al-Qaysarānī (d. 1154) and explore his largely obscure poetic legacy, especially his fascinating Ifranjiyyāt (Poems on...

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A section for the review of books is a regular feature of 0fLandscape Journal as discussed by the authors, where the opinions and ideas expressed in the reviews are those of the reviewers and do not necessarily depict the views of the Journal editors or the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture.
Abstract: A section for the review of books is a regular feature 0fLandscape Journal. The opinions and ideas expressed in the reviews are those of the reviewers and do not necessarily depict the views of the Journal’s editors or the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. Suggestions for books to be reviewed are always welcome, as are comments regarding the reviews published. All correspondence should be sent to the Book Review editors:

753 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors presents the Crusades from the perspective of those against whom they were waged, the Muslim peoples of the Levant, and counterbalances the numerous books that tell the story of the crusading period from the European point of view, enabling readers to achieve a broader and more complete perspective on the period.
Abstract: God's BattalionsThe Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim WorldWarriors of GodThe Race for ParadiseShadow of the SwordsCrusadeMuslims and CrusadersCrusading PeaceThe Crusades, Christianity, and IslamMuslim Sources of the Crusader PeriodThe CrusadesThe Social Origins of IslamControversial Histories – Current Views on the CrusadesEncountering Islam on the First CrusadeThe Intensification and Reorientation of Sunni Jihad Ideology in the Crusader PeriodInfidelsIslam's War Against the CrusadersThe Crusades Through Arab EyesHoly WarThe CrusadesThe Origin of the Idea of CrusadeIslam Through Western EyesIbn 'Asakir of DamascusForgetting Osama Bin Munqidh Remembering Osama Bin LadenIslam and the CrusadesSyria in Crusader TimesThe CrusadesThe Book of ContemplationPopular Muslim Reactions to the Franks in the Levant, 1097–1291Medieval Muslim Historians and the Franks in the LevantThe Crusades: Islamic PerspectivesThe Crusader StatesA Muslim Principality in Crusader TimesThe Shade of SwordsThe Muslim MindSeven Myths of the CrusadesThe CrusadesThe History of al-Tabari Vol. 26A Brief History of the CrusadesArab Historians of the Crusades (Routledge Revivals) Muslims and Crusaders supplements and counterbalances the numerous books that tell the story of the crusading period from the European point of view, enabling readers to achieve a broader and more complete perspective on the period. It presents the Crusades from the perspective of those against whom they were waged, the Muslim peoples of the Levant. The

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that Polish mosque conflicts must be contextualised within Poland's unique historical encounter with Islam in order to more accurately make sense of its creeping Islamophobia. But they do not discuss the role of Islamophobia in these conflicts.
Abstract: Although significant scholarly attention has been devoted to the study of mosque conflicts in Europe, up until now most of it has focussed on Western European countries. This has left a significant gap to be filled in the study of mosque tensions in Central and Eastern Europe, where scholarship is scant yet where tensions over constructions of mosques are not less intensive than in the West. Drawing on two recent case studies of mosque constructions in Poland, we argue that a significant shift has taken place in the ways that mosques are perceived, unveiling unprecedented opposition towards their construction. From being largely unproblematic before the Second World War and during the Communist era, mosques have become subjects of fierce public debate. We draw parallels to how anti-mosque arguments raised in Poland fit into a larger European meta-narrative on mosques and Muslims, yet our aim is to situate the paper historically to argue that Polish mosque conflicts must be contextualised within Poland’s unique historical encounter with Islam in order to more accurately make sense of its creeping Islamophobia.

22 citations