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Okasha Noureldin

Bio: Okasha Noureldin is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Egyptology. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 52 citations.
Topics: Egyptology

Papers
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this article, a neglected period in the history of Egyptology has been studied, focusing on the sources available to medieval Moslem/Arabs to learn about Ancient Egypt, and various elements that contributed to the making of an Interpretatio Arabica of Ancient Egypt.
Abstract: This thesis researches a neglected period in the history of Egyptology. The impetus was my own training in Egyptology in which no mention was ever made of any medieval Arab contribution. My upbringing as an Egyptian had made me aware of some of the sources which could fill the gap between the classical sources and the European Renaissance. The first chapter discusses the sources available to medieval Moslem/Arabs to learn about Ancient Egypt, and the various elements that contributed to the making of an Interpretatio Arabica of Ancient Egypt. As Egyptian monuments have always been perceived as hiding great treasures, the second chapter discusses treasure hunters, their manuals and state regulation, and the economics of the profession. I give examples of these manuals and their relevance to current archaeological work. Chapter three covers medieval Arab archaeological methods and descriptions of ancient sites and objects. Chapter four shows how interest in ancient Egyptian scripts continued and the attempts by some Medieval Moslem/Arab scholars to decipher hieroglyphs, having realised that it has an alphabet. I give examples of Egyptian scripts correctly deciphered. Chapter five discusses the Medieval Moslem/Arab concepts of Ancient Egyptian religion and how they interpreted the many intact temples. It covers the role of magic, the nature of royal cults, animal cults and holy sites. Chapter six discusses Egyptian Mummia, Mummification and Burial Practices of both humans and animals as well as the medicinal use of mummia in Arabic medicine. Chapter seven shows that Egypt was thought to be the land of science par excellence and gives examples of different scientific Mirabilia attributed to scientists of Pre-Islamic Egypt. Chapter eight discusses the Moslem/Arab concept of Egyptian Kingship and State Administration. It shows the survival of some ancient Egyptian institutions such as “Children of the Room” into the medieval period. I include a case study of Queen Cleopatra showing how the Arabic Romance of this queen differs significantly from its Western counterpart. Chapter nine gives the biographies of the main Arab writers whose works have formed the basis of my thesis. The last chapter contains my conclusions and recommendations for further work that I hope others may pursue.

52 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
31 Jan 1986

316 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

76 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1941-Nature
TL;DR: The sixteenth century is commonly regarded as marking the birth of modern science and it owes this distinction mainly to the achievements of a small number of men, of whom Copernicus, Vesalius, Gilbert, Tycho Brahe, Gesner, Libavius, Bruno, Fracastoro and Porta are the most famous.
Abstract: THE sixteenth century is commonly regarded as marking the birth of modern science. It owes this distinction mainly to the achievements of a small number of men, of whom Copernicus, Vesalius, Gilbert, Tycho Brahe, Gesner, Libavius, Bruno, Fracastoro and Porta are the most famous. These constituted a very small percentage of the authors who enjoyed some sort of reputation among their contemporaries for their views on natural phenomena. Prof. Thorndike deals with about 1,200 such writers. The vast majority of them were of little, if any, scientific importance. A History of Magic and Experimental Science Vols. 5 and 6: The Sixteenth Century. By Prof. Lynn Thorndike. (History of Science Society Publications, New Series 4.) Vol. 5. Pp. xxii + 695. Vol. 6. Pp. xviii + 766. (New York: Columbia University Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1941.) 66s. 6d. net.

73 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the period between 1798 and 1914 and examine how European imperialists and Egyptian nationalists approached the history of Egyptian antiquity and how they constructed it for elite or public consumption through museums and books.
Abstract: Many tourists marvel at Egypt’s ancient historical wealth but are oblivious to the existence of Egyptians, and many of the latter feel little it‘ any connection to an alienized, Pharaonic past. It is the history of these modem-day disjunctions that Donald Malcolm Reid seeks 10 comprehend and rectify in his book Whow Phanrohs? By focusing on the period between 1798 and 1914, Reid looks at how European imperialists and Egyptian nationalists approached the history of Egyptian antiquity and how they constructed it for elite or public consumption through museums and book\\. The book (in two parts and eight chapters) is based o n extensive research into European and Arabic sources that have not been previously used. I t traces the growth in European interest in E.,gyptian archaeology from Champollion to Mariette and Maspero. Reid deftly and engagingly chronicles the race among various curiitors and art collectors to possess Egyptian artifacts, ignoring all the while the rights of modem Egyptians-all under the pretext that the latter were not civilized enough to appreciate their past. Subsequently, he traces the cultural politics surrounding the establishment of various museums in Egypt and links this to the overall struggle between emerging nationalist sentiments in Egypt and imperial rule and designs for the country. From this perspective, he explores the tense and difficult relation between a science claiming objectivity and universality (archaeology) and the subjective politics of nationalism and imperialism. But what is perhaps most appealing about the book is that Reid writes Egyptians back into the history of Egyptian archaeology. In particular, he elucidates how Egyptian intellectuals, such as al-Tahtawi, politicians, such as Khedive Isma’il, and archaeologists, such as Ahmad Kamal, are an integral part of that history. He expands the history of Egyptian museums to encompass not only Pharaonic archaeology but also the Greco-Roman, Coptic, and Islamic eras. In expanding our scope in this manner, Reid contextualizes and reevaluates the extent of European archaeological accomplishments vis-h-vis those of their Egyptian counterparts. In all these ways, Reid bypasses all previous histories of Egyptian museums and archaeology and introduces new ideas and knowledge about those narratives. That he does so in a lucid narrative form makes Who.se Phuraohs? accessible for an educated general audience. However, it would most surely be of great use to historians and graduate students of Egyptian history.

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Petrie has been called the "father of modern Egyptology" as discussed by the authors, and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods, and his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89.
Abstract: Flinders Petrie has been called the \"Father of Modern Egyptology\" - and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods. Here Margaret S. Drower, a student of Petrie's in the early 1930s, traces his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89. Drower presents Petrie as he was: an enthusiastic eccentric, diligently plunging into the uncharted past of ancient Egypt. She tells not only of his spectacular finds, including the tombs of the first Pharaohs, the earliest alphabetic script, a Homer manuscript, and a collection of painted portraits on mummy cases, but also of Petrie's important contributions to the science of modern archaeology, such as orderly record-keeping of the progress of a dig and the use of pottery sherds in historical dating.

58 citations