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Oleg V. Dolomanov

Bio: Oleg V. Dolomanov is an academic researcher from Durham University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Software & Crystal structure. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 22 publication(s) receiving 16290 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Oleg V. Dolomanov include École Polytechnique & École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: OLEX2 seamlessly links all aspects of the structure solution, refinement and publication process and presents them in a single workflow-driven package, with the ultimate goal of producing an application which will be useful to both chemists and crystallographers.
Abstract: New software, OLEX2, has been developed for the determination, visualization and analysis of molecular crystal structures. The software has a portable mouse-driven workflow-oriented and fully comprehensive graphical user interface for structure solution, refinement and report generation, as well as novel tools for structure analysis. OLEX2 seamlessly links all aspects of the structure solution, refinement and publication process and presents them in a single workflow-driven package, with the ultimate goal of producing an application which will be useful to both chemists and crystallographers.

14,922 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An in-depth presentation is given of olex2.refine, the new refinement engine integrated in the Olex2 program.
Abstract: This paper describes the mathematical basis for olex2.refine, the new refinement engine which is integrated within the Olex2 program. Precise and clear equations are provided for every computation performed by this engine, including structure factors and their derivatives, constraints, restraints and twinning; a general overview is also given of the different components of the engine and their relation to each other. A framework for adding multiple general constraints with dependencies on common physical parameters is described. Several new restraints on atomic displacement parameters are also presented.

667 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This software has a Windows-compatible mouse-driven graphical interface which gives full control over all structural elements and provides the user with tools to construct topological networks, visualize interpenetrating or overlapping fragments, and analyse networks constructed fully or partially by exploiting short interactions.
Abstract: We have developed new software (OLEX) for the visualization and analysis of extended crystal structures. This software has a Windows-compatible mouse-driven graphical interface which gives full control over all structural elements. OLEX provides the user with tools to construct topological networks, visualize interpenetrating or overlapping fragments, and analyse networks constructed fully or partially by exploiting short interactions. It is also easy to generate conventional ellipsoid, ball-and-stick or packing plots.

420 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2018-IUCrJ
TL;DR: Anisotropic atomic displacement parameters obtained separately from highly accurate X-ray and neutron diffraction data are compared and it is established that Hirshfeld atom refinement of X-rays can provide structural parameters that are as accurate as those from neutron data.
Abstract: Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a novel X-ray structure refinement technique that employs aspherical atomic scattering factors obtained from stockholder partitioning of a theoretically determined tailor-made static electron density. HAR overcomes many of the known limitations of independent atom modelling (IAM), such as too short element–hydrogen distances, r(X—H), or too large atomic displacement parameters (ADPs). This study probes the accuracy and precision of anisotropic hydrogen and non-hydrogen ADPs and of r(X—H) values obtained from HAR. These quantities are compared and found to agree with those obtained from (i) accurate neutron diffraction data measured at the same temperatures as the X-ray data and (ii) multipole modelling (MM), an established alternative method for interpreting X-ray diffraction data with the help of aspherical atomic scattering factors. Results are presented for three chemically different systems: the aromatic hydro­carbon rubrene (orthorhombic 5,6,11,12-tetra­phenyl­tetracene), a co-crystal of zwitterionic betaine, imidazolium cations and picrate anions (BIPa), and the salt potassium hydrogen oxalate (KHOx). The non-hydrogen HAR-ADPs are as accurate and precise as the MM-ADPs. Both show excellent agreement with the neutron-based values and are superior to IAM-ADPs. The anisotropic hydrogen HAR-ADPs show a somewhat larger deviation from neutron-based values than the hydrogen SHADE-ADPs used in MM. Element–hydrogen bond lengths from HAR are in excellent agreement with those obtained from neutron diffraction experiments, although they are somewhat less precise. The residual density contour maps after HAR show fewer features than those after MM. Calculating the static electron density with the def2-TZVP basis set instead of the simpler def2-SVP one does not improve the refinement results significantly. All HARs were performed within the recently introduced HARt option implemented in the Olex2 program. They are easily launched inside its graphical user interface following a conventional IAM.

51 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: CIF.iotbx.cif is a comprehensive toolbox for the development of applications that make use of the CIF format.
Abstract: iotbx.cif is a new software module for the development of applications that make use of the CIF format. Comprehensive tools are provided for input, output and validation of CIFs, as well as for interconversion with high-level cctbx [Grosse-Kunstleve, Sauter, Moriarty & Adams (2002). J. Appl. Cryst. 35, 126–136] crystallographic objects. The interface to the library is written in Python, whilst parsing is carried out using a compiled parser, combining the performance of a compiled language (C++) with the benefits of using an interpreted language.

50 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
10 Mar 1970-

8,159 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The creation, maintenance, information content and availability of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), the world’s repository of small molecule crystal structures, are described.
Abstract: The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal–organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface.

4,784 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The SQUEEZE method is documents as an alternative means of addressing the solvent disorder issue and conveniently interfaces with the 2014 version of the least-squares refinement program SHELXL, and many twinned structures containing disordered solvents are now also treatable by SQUEEze.
Abstract: The completion of a crystal structure determination is often hampered by the presence of embedded solvent molecules or ions that are seriously disordered. Their contribution to the calculated structure factors in the least-squares refinement of a crystal structure has to be included in some way. Traditionally, an atomistic solvent disorder model is attempted. Such an approach is generally to be preferred, but it does not always lead to a satisfactory result and may even be impossible in cases where channels in the structure are filled with continuous electron density. This paper documents the SQUEEZE method as an alternative means of addressing the solvent disorder issue. It conveniently interfaces with the 2014 version of the least-squares refinement program SHELXL [Sheldrick (2015). Acta Cryst. C71. In the press] and other refinement programs that accept externally provided fixed contributions to the calculated structure factors. The PLATON SQUEEZE tool calculates the solvent contribution to the structure factors by back-Fourier transformation of the electron density found in the solvent-accessible region of a phase-optimized difference electron-density map. The actual least-squares structure refinement is delegated to, for example, SHELXL. The current versions of PLATON SQUEEZE and SHELXL now address several of the unnecessary complications with the earlier implementation of the SQUEEZE procedure that were a necessity because least-squares refinement with the now superseded SHELXL97 program did not allow for the input of fixed externally provided contributions to the structure-factor calculation. It is no longer necessary to subtract the solvent contribution temporarily from the observed intensities to be able to use SHELXL for the least-squares refinement, since that program now accepts the solvent contribution from an external file (.fab file) if the ABIN instruction is used. In addition, many twinned structures containing disordered solvents are now also treatable by SQUEEZE. The details of a SQUEEZE calculation are now automatically included in the CIF archive file, along with the unmerged reflection data. The current implementation of the SQUEEZE procedure is described, and discussed and illustrated with three examples. Two of them are based on the reflection data of published structures and one on synthetic reflection data generated for a published structure.

2,100 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: ShelXle is a user-friendly graphical user interface forSHELXL that combines an editor with syntax highlighting for SHELXL-associated files with an interactive graphical display for visualization of a three-dimensional structure.
Abstract: ShelXle is a graphical user interface for SHELXL [Sheldrick, G. M. (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 112–122], currently the most widely used program for small-molecule structure refinement. It combines an editor with syntax highlighting for the SHELXL-associated .ins (input) and .res (output) files with an interactive graphical display for visualization of a three-dimensional structure including the electron density (Fo) and difference density (Fo–Fc) maps. Special features of ShelXle include intuitive atom (re-)naming, a strongly coupled editor, structure visualization in various mono and stereo modes, and a novel way of displaying disorder extending over special positions. ShelXle is completely compatible with all features of SHELXL and is written entirely in C++ using the Qt4 and FFTW libraries. It is available at no cost for Windows, Linux and Mac-OS X and as source code.

2,054 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 10

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20212
20192
20181
20171
20151
20122

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Author's top 5 most impactful journals

Acta Crystallographica Section A

7 papers, 682 citations

Journal of Applied Crystallography

4 papers, 15.3K citations

Chemical Communications

2 papers, 76 citations

Crystal Growth & Design

2 papers, 28 citations