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Olivia Engle

Bio: Olivia Engle is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Abortion & Mobilities. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
06 Sep 2019
TL;DR: “Can the authors finally stop whispering about it?”, asks Elizabeth Kissling at the start of From a Whisper to a Shout: Abortion Activism and Social Media (p. 12).
Abstract: “Can we finally stop whispering about it?”, asks Elizabeth Kissling at the start of From a Whisper to a Shout: Abortion Activism and Social Media (p. 12). Although abortion has been a constitutiona...

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper analyzed two young adult novels (Girls on the Verge and Unpregnant) and two films (Grandma and Never Rarely Sometimes Always) that follow adolescent girls traveling for abortions in the contemporary United States and argued that representations of the abortion road trip are novel for their focus on barriers and politics of abortion access in the United States.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors of Early medical abortion, equality of access, and the telemedical imperative argue that any society that claims to hold evidence-based healthcare in high regard has a moral obligation to introduce, retain, or reinstate TEMA to protect and promote the health of pregnant people.
Abstract: Early medical abortion via telemedicine (TEMA) is safe, effective, and acceptable to both patients and providers. Given this strong evidence base, the authors of Early medical abortion, equality of access, and the telemedical imperative argue that “any society that claims to hold evidence-based healthcare in high regard has a moral obligation to introduce, retain, or reinstate (as applicable) TEMA to protect and promote the health of pregnant people” (p.xxix). Building upon Parsons’ proposed “telemedical imperative” and drawing on the case studies of the United Kingdom and the United States, Parsons and Romanis are concerned with abortion access and advocating for TEMA as one choice among many in patientcentred reproductive health. Although COVID-19 prompted the legalisation of full TEMA in England, Scotland, and Wales and at the federal level in the US, the authors lament that “it took a global pandemic and the resulting near impossibility of providing adequate abortion services to finally push those in power to make changes that enabled TEMA provision” (p.xxiii). Nevertheless, this book does not take COVID-19 as its starting point – the moral imperative to implement TEMA existed prior to the pandemic. The authors begin by correctly reminding the reader that TEMA is “not a speculative proposal” (p.xxiv); for most of the twenty-first century, abortion providers have been implementing “full” and “partial” TEMA within and outside of national regulatory frameworks. Although TEMA has been proven to be successful in terms of safety, effectiveness, and acceptability, its implementation has been hindered by socio-legal barriers to abortion. In both the UK and US, abortion policy dictates who can have an abortion, when, where, and how. That abortion is subject to such extensive – and unnecessary – regulation is, as the authors argue, a sign of its exceptionalism under the law. Under the guise of pregnant people’s safety, abortion regulations in both countries serve only to limit access to abortion. The authors suggest that abortion policy in the UK “cannot rightly be described as evidence based” but could generously be “characterised as evidence informed” (p.70), whereas in the US the “landscape of access is devastating” (p.55). The telemedical imperative, further developed here from Parsons, is the duty for health care systems to implement telemedicine where it is safe, effective, and acceptable and there are no service-specific concerns. The authors successfully make the case for early medical abortion (EMA) satisfying these conditions in both countries. First, the evidence reviewed in this book demonstrates the safety, effectiveness, and acceptability of TEMA. Second, the authors address servicespecific concerns such as clinic closures resulting from the uptake of TEMA, issues with safeguarding via telemedicine, and the ability to successfully date pregnancies without in-person care. They rightly conclude that these concerns are “insufficient to deny the telemedical imperative in the case of EMA” (p.93). The authors outline several convincing benefits of TEMA: overcoming health inequalities, improving efficiency, and enhancing autonomy of service users. The authors concede that TEMA is not a “silver bullet in the context of abortion care” (p.75). Rather, they argue that telemedicine is “a way of enablingmore people to access care that is already available to them” (ibid.). Indeed, they reject the idea that in-person services become an “option B”, which presupposes that telemedicine is somehow better. For the authors, TEMA is “additional and not substitutionary” (p.76). The authors caution that TEMA and in-person services are not a simple either/or. Instead, they offer a useful “telemedical continuum” that extends from no remote BOOKSHELF
Journal ArticleDOI

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
27 Dec 2019
TL;DR: “Because of its pervasiveness, its disruption of multiple life domains (e.g., resources, social relationships, and coping behaviors), and its corrosive impact on the health of populations, stigma s...
Abstract: “Because of its pervasiveness, its disruption of multiple life domains (e.g., resources, social relationships, and coping behaviors), and its corrosive impact on the health of populations, stigma s...

15 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors trace the history of elisions, euphemisms and silences that have characterised the Irish abortion debate and show how the historical backdrop to such publicly shared accounts of abortion is almost the complete reverse insofar as for much of the country's independence, abortion occupied almost the status of a taboo in Irish public life.
Abstract: This chapter traces the history of elisions, euphemisms and silences that have characterised the Irish abortion debate historically. It opens by considering an extremely vocal, confessional contemporary incident involving two women who live-tweeted each step of an abortion journey from the Republic of Ireland to the United Kingdom in late 2016. Then the chapter continues by showing how the historical backdrop to such publicly shared accounts of abortion is almost the complete reverse insofar as for much of the country’s independence, abortion occupied almost the status of a taboo in Irish public life. This is connected, the chapter argues, to the peculiar history of Irish sexuality, and the inordinate degree of influence the Catholic church exercised over matters to do with sex, the body and reproduction for most of the twentieth century. It shows further how this unhealthy clerical influence fell most heavily on the bodies of Irish women.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Internet-mediated focus groups (FGs) have become a feature of qualitative research over the last decade; however, their use within social sciences has been adopted at a slower pace than other disci...
Abstract: Internet-mediated focus groups (FGs) have become a feature of qualitative research over the last decade; however, their use within social sciences has been adopted at a slower pace than other disci...

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a review of how geographers and other scholars are now considering abortion and uses three conceptual lenses of discourse, spatiality and mobility to argue that abortion should be a mainstream topic of critical concern for geographers.
Abstract: Abortion has historically been ignored in geography. Although bodies and pregnancy have been increasingly studied since the 1990s, a reticence around abortion remains. In recent years, however, this has begun to change. This article critically reviews how geographers and other scholars are now considering abortion and uses three conceptual lenses of discourse, spatiality and mobility to argue that abortion should be a mainstream topic of critical concern for geographers. Through these themes we show that geographical attention to abortion makes questions of space, power, and citizenship visible in new ways and, furthermore, in ways that are only recently possible.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors explore abortion care activism within the Peruvian context, foregrounding a key mobilisation that has emerged against a state of un-care -acompañante carework.
Abstract: For abortion seekers, Peru is an uncaring state where legal and policy interventions have resulted in violence, persecution, and neglect. This state of abortion uncare is set within historic and ongoing denials of reproductive autonomy, coercive reproductive care, and the marginalisation of abortion. Abortion is not supported, even where legally permissible. Here we explore abortion care activism within the Peruvian context, foregrounding a key mobilisation that has emerged against a state of un-care - acompañante carework. Through interviews with people involved in abortion access and activism in Peru, we argue that acompañantes have constructed an infrastructure of abortion care in Peru through the bringing together of actors, technologies, and strategies. This infrastructure is shaped by a feminist ethic of care that differs from minority world care assumptions regarding high quality abortion care in three key ways: (i) care is provided beyond the state; (ii) care is holistic; and (iii) care is collective. We argue that US feminist debates relating to the emerging hyperrestrictive state of abortion un-care as well as broader research on feminist care can learn from acompañante activism strategically and conceptually.

2 citations