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Author

Otto von Busch

Other affiliations: University of Gothenburg
Bio: Otto von Busch is an academic researcher from The New School. The author has contributed to research in topics: Craft & Democracy. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 26 publications receiving 261 citations. Previous affiliations of Otto von Busch include University of Gothenburg.

Papers
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22 Sep 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a series of extensive projects which aim to explore a new designer role for fashion, a role that experiments with how fashion can be reverse engineered, hacked, tuned and shared among many participants as a form of social activism.
Abstract: This thesis consists of a series of extensive projects which aim to explore a new designer role for fashion. It is a role that experiments with how fashion can be reverse engineered, hacked, tuned and shared among many participants as a form of social activism. This social design practice can be called the hacktivism of fashion. It is an engaged and collective process of enablement, creative resistance and DIY practice, where a community share methods and experiences on how to expand action spaces and develop new forms of craftsmanship. In this practice, the designer engages participants to reform fashion from a phenomenon of dictations and anxiety to a collective experience of empowerment, in other words, to make them become fashion-able. As its point of departure, the research takes the practice of hands-on exploration in the DIY upcycling of clothes through ?open source? fashion ?cookbooks?. By means of hands-on processes, the projects endeavour to create a complementary understanding of the modes of production within the field of fashion design. The artistic research projects have ranged from DIY-kits released at an international fashion week, fashion experiments in galleries, collaborative ?hacking? at a shoe factory, engaged design at a rehabilitation centre as well as combined efforts with established fashion brands. Using parallels from hacking, heresy, fan fiction, small change and professional-amateurs, the thesis builds a non-linear framework by which the reader can draw diagonal interpretations through the artistic research projects presented. By means of this alternative reading new understandings may emerge that can expand the action spaces available for fashion design. This approach is not about subverting fashion as much as hacking and tuning it, and making its sub-routines run in new ways, or in other words, bending the current while still keeping the power on.

82 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Oct 2015-Codesign
TL;DR: In this paper, actor-network theory is used as an alternative means to account for democratic deficiencies of co-design practices in participatory urban planning, and the concept of translation is used to describe how the original interests of participants may be betrayed, as successive translations cause objectives to drift.
Abstract: In recent years, various critiques of participative approaches to design processes have been presented. Participatory urban planning has been subject to a specific form of criticism, which posits that such processes are ‘post-political’, inasmuch as they merely legitimise the power and political agendas of elites. In reviewing a case of participatory urban planning in Gothenburg, Sweden, this article suggests that actor-network theory can be operationalised as an alternative means to account for democratic deficiencies of co-design practices. It thus uses the concept of translation to describe how the original interests of participants may be betrayed, as successive translations cause objectives to drift. It also suggests that the key agency in these unfortunate betrayals is not human, but emerges through the material modes of collaboration. The article thus endeavours to contribute to the debate on how co-design processes may become more effective means to democratise urban planning and design.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2010

19 citations

09 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the potential for design thinking to be used as a tool for the exercise of cybernetic control in the context of a mounting dissent with social injustice, and the extent to which it may be deployed as a means to "guide" democracy is discussed.
Abstract: This article interrogates the proposition, recently put forward by design thinking advocates Tim Brown and Roger Martin, that democratic capitalism needs design thinking. More specifically, it assesses three problematics that emerge when design thinking moves from corporate settings to the public sphere of democratic deliberation. The text thus discusses the potential for design thinking to be used as a tool for the exercise of cybernetic control in the context of a mounting dissent with social injustice, and the extent to which it may be deployed as a means to “guide” democracy. Furthermore, it posits that the expectations placed on design thinking reflect the design profession’s agnostic approach to realpolitik.

18 citations


Cited by
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Brijesh Singh1
01 Dec 2016
TL;DR: Ries was one of the pioneers of the Lean Startup philosophy as discussed by the authors, based on the Japanese Philosophy of Lean Manufacturing, and he pioneered the philosophy of Lean Startup based on his experience with multiple startups.
Abstract: Eric Ries was born in September 1978. He graduated from Yale University and moved to silicon Valley in the beginning of the millennium. He pioneered the philosophy of Lean Startup, based on his experience with multiple startups, primary being IMVU which he co-founded along with Will Harvey in 2004. Eric Ries originated his Lean Startup philosophy after getting inspired from the Japanese Philosophy of Lean Manufacturing.

776 citations