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Outi-Inkeri Elisabet Lehtipuu

Bio: Outi-Inkeri Elisabet Lehtipuu is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Early Christianity & Biblical studies. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 4 publications receiving 112 citations.

Papers
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Book
05 Oct 2017
TL;DR: In this article, a collection of essays dealing with perceptions of wisdom, femaleness, and their interconnections in a wide range of ancient sources, including papyri, Nag Hammadi documents, heresiological accounts and monastic literature is presented.
Abstract: Women and Knowledge in Early Christianity offers a collection of essays that deal with perceptions of wisdom, femaleness, and their interconnections in a wide range of ancient sources, including papyri, Nag Hammadi documents, heresiological accounts and monastic literature.

85 citations

Book ChapterDOI
20 Jul 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on what actual books were regarded as scripture before the fourth century, when the term kanōn started to be used in the meaning of a list of normative books.
Abstract: What did early Christians conceive of as scripture? What texts did they read and use? Who read and used them? How were the books that are now included in the biblical canon chosen? Finding answers to these questions is challenging, not least because of the scarcity of evidence, particularly on the earliest times. Even though scriptures assumed a constitutive role for Jesus’ followers from the beginning and early Christian writers constantly appealed to authoritative texts, there is surprisingly little discussion on what actual books were regarded as scripture before the fourth century. It is only then when the term kanōn starts to be used in the meaning of a list of normative books (Metzger 1987: 289–293).

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines ascetic ideals in early Christianity from the viewpoint of remarriage, and analyses reading strategies applied to this passage by three ascetically inclined authors, Tertullian, John Chrysostom and Epiphanius.
Abstract: The Reformation gave a strong impetus to a development which has made marriage and family the (Protestant) Christian norm and singleness the exception. This article examines ascetic ideals in early Christianity from the viewpoint of remarriage. While staying celibate was uncommon, the valorization of an ascetic lifestyle prevailed – as long as it represented “true” asceticism, based on free will, and not “heretical” asceticism, allegedly based on false grounds. It was not an easy task to harmonize some scriptural teachings to such ascetic tendencies. One of the problematic passages was the recommendation to let young widows remarry (1 Timothy 5:14). This article analyses reading strategies applied to this passage by three ascetically inclined authors, Tertullian, John Chrysostom and Epiphanius. In spite of their different geographical and historical situations and differences in their attitudes towards remarriage, their readings of this passage contain several similarities – along with some dissimilarities.

8 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, women, fire, and dangerous things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind are discussed and discussed in the context of women's empowerment and women's mental health.
Abstract: (1988). Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind. The Journal of Higher Education: Vol. 59, No. 6, pp. 698-699.

418 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the evolution of female ascetic life and the demise of the Homoiousian model in Asia Minor: "Virgins of God", "Parthenoi", widows, deaconesses, etc.
Abstract: Part 1 Asia Minor: \"Virgins of God\" - variations of female ascetic life Basil of Caesarea - the classic model in the background - Macrina and Naucratius Homoisousian asceticism \"Parthenoi\", widows, deaconesses - continuing variety symbiosis of male and female ascetics and the demise of the Homoiousian model. Part 2 Egypt: canons and papyri desert-mothers and wandering virgins - the \"Apophthegmata Patrum\" Pachomius and Shenoute - the other classic model \"in the desert and in the countryside, in towns or villages\" - the \"Historia Lausiaca\" and the \"Historia Monachorum\" Athanasius of Alexandria and urban asceticism.

182 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the purpose of Matthew in Light of the Incipit is discussed and the role of Deutero-Zechariah in Matthew's Olivet Discourse is discussed.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Myth Theory, Comparison, and Embedded Scripture Texts 2. Love as Societal Vision and Counter-Imperial Practice in Matthew 22.34-40 - Warren Carter 3. Matthew's Earliest Interpreter: Justin Martyr on Matthew's Fulfillment Quotations - J.R.C. Cousland 4. 'The Book of the Genesis of Jesus Christ' The Purpose of Matthew in Light of the Incipit - Craig A. Evans. 5. Mark, Elijah, the Baptist and Matthew: The Success of the First Intertextual Reading of Mark - Mark Goodacre 6. Reading Zechariah and Matthew's Olivet Discourse - Clay Alan Ham 7. From History to Myth and Back Again: The Historicizing Function of Scripture in Matthew 2 - Thomas R. Hatina 8. Plotting Jesus: Characterization, Identity, and the Voice of God in Matthew's Gospel - Michael P. Knowles 9. The King as Shepherd: the Role of Deutero-Zechariah in Matthew - John Nolland 10. Matthew's Atomistic Use of Scripture: Messianic Interpretation of Isaiah 53.4 in Matthew 8.17 - Lidija Novakovic 11. Scribal Methods in Matthew and Mishnah Abot -Lawrence M. Wills 12. Matthew's Intertexts and the Presentation of Jesus as Healer-Messiah - Andries G. van Aarde Bibliography Index of References Index of Authors.

176 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Goddesses, Whores, Wives, Slaves, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity are discussed. But they do not discuss the role of women as slaves.
Abstract: (1975). Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity. History: Reviews of New Books: Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 36-36.

169 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A thread running through the diverse works of ferninist legal discourse under review here is the dialectical relationship between law as it is and Law as it ought to be as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: If a single thread runs through the diverse works of ferninist legal sdiolarship under review here, it is the dialectical relationship between law as it is and law as it ought to be. The dilemma these legal scholars face is a little like that of the physician who is compelled to treat a virulent malignancy with a partial and debilitating therapy while simultaneously casting about for a complete and benign cure. What is at issue for the ferninist theorist, the feminist attorney, and even the feminist legal historian, who are very often bound up together in the same person, is not only the long-term theoretical challenge of dismantling the whole web of legal ideology that both sustains and masks the subordination of women, but the immediate and tangible challenge of subverting that ideology by selectively engaging it on its own terms. The tension between these challenges is not without positive results. The emergence of sexual harassment as a legal issue, for example, has depended on a campaign that began by converting theoretical insights about sexual subordination in the workplace into a legally actionable wrong. Formal definition of the wrong provided the groundwork for Anita Hill's testimony against Clarence Thomas before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and her testimony, in turn, propelled the issue of sexual

104 citations