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Author

P.H. Pathak

Bio: P.H. Pathak is an academic researcher from Ohio State University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Knife-edge effect & Fresnel equations. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publication(s) receiving 2478 citation(s).
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
R.G. Kouyoumjian1, P.H. Pathak1Institutions (1)
01 Nov 1974
Abstract: A compact dyadic diffraction coefficient for electromagnetic waves obliquely incident on a curved edse formed by perfectly conducting curved ot plane surfaces is obtained. This diffraction coefficient remains valid in the transition regions adjacent to shadow and reflection boundaries, where the diffraction coefficients of Keller's original theory fail. Our method is based on Keller's method of the canonical problem, which in this case is the perfectly conducting wedge illuminated by plane, cylindrical, conical, and spherical waves. When the proper ray-fixed coordinate system is introduced, the dyadic diffraction coefficient for the wedge is found to be the sum of only two dyads, and it is shown that this is also true for the dyadic diffraction coefficients of higher order edges. One dyad contains the acoustic soft diffraction coefficient; the other dyad contains the acoustic hard diffraction coefficient. The expressions for the acoustic wedge diffraction coefficients contain Fresenel integrals, which ensure that the total field is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries. The diffraction coefficients have the same form for the different types of edge illumination; only the arguments of the Fresnel integrals are different. Since diffraction is a local phenomenon, and locally the curved edge structure is wedge shaped, this result is readily extended to the curved wedge. It is interesting that even though the polarizations and the wavefront curvatures of the incident, reflected, and diffracted waves are markedly different, the total field calculated from this high-frequency solution for the curved wedge is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries.

2,478 citations


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Book
01 Jan 2005

9,031 citations


Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The principal computational approaches for Maxwell's equations included the high-frequency asymptotic methods of Keller (1962) as well as Kouyoumjian and Pathak (1974) and the integral equation techniques of Harrington (1968) .
Abstract: Prior to abour 1990, the modeling of electromagnetic engineering systems was primarily implemented using solution techniques for the sinusoidal steady-state Maxwell's equations. Before about 1960, the principal approaches in this area involved closed-form and infinite-series analytical solutions, with numerical results from these analyses obtained using mechanical calculators. After 1960, the increasing availability of programmable electronic digital computers permitted such frequency-domain approaches to rise markedly in sophistication. Researchers were able to take advantage of the capabilities afforded by powerful new high-level programming languages such as Fortran, rapid random-access storage of large arrags of numbers, and computational speeds that were orders of magnitude faster than possible with mechanical calculators. In this period, the principal computational approaches for Maxwell's equations included the high-frequency asymptotic methods of Keller (1962) as well as Kouyoumjian and Pathak (1974) and the integral equation techniques of Harrington (1968) .

858 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Per-Simon Kildal1Institutions (1)
Abstract: A transversely corrugated surface as used in corrugated horn antennas represents a soft boundary. A hard boundary is made by using longitudinal corrugations filled with dielectric material. The concept of soft and hard surfaces is treated in detail, considering different geometries. It is shown that both the hard and soft boundaries have the advantage of a polarization-independent reflection coefficient for geometrical optics ray fields, so that a circularly polarized wave is circularly polarized in the same sense after reflection. The hard boundary can be used to obtain strong radiation fields along a surface for any polarization, whereas the soft boundary makes the fields radiated along the surface zero. >

636 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
S.Y. Seidel, Theodore S. Rappaport1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Time delay comparison shows that the amplitudes of many significant multipath components are accurately predicted by this model, and the effective building material properties are derived for two dissimilar buildings based upon comparison of measured and predicted power delay profiles.
Abstract: The paper describes a geometrical optics based model to predict propagation within buildings for personal communication system (PCS) design. A ray tracing model for predicting propagation based on a building blueprint representation is presented for a transmitter and receiver located on the same floor inside a building. Measured and predicted propagation data are presented as power delay profiles that contain the amplitude and arrival time of individual multipath components. Measured and predicted power delay profiles are compared on a location-by-location basis to provide both a qualitative and a quantitative measure of the model accuracy. The concept of effective building material properties is developed, and the effective building material properties are derived for two dissimilar buildings based upon comparison of measured and predicted power delay profiles. Time delay comparison shows that the amplitudes of many significant multipath components are accurately predicted by this model. Path loss between a transmitter and receiver is predicted with a standard deviation of less than 5 dB over 45 locations in two different buildings. >

597 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Magdy F. Iskander1, Zhengqing Yun1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the propagation prediction models for terrestrial wireless communication systems is presented and the focus is placed on the application of ray-tracing techniques to the development of deterministic propagation models.
Abstract: A comprehensive review of the propagation prediction models for terrestrial wireless communication systems is presented in this paper. The classic empirical models are briefly described and the focus is placed on the application of ray-tracing techniques to the development of deterministic propagation models. Schemes to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy are discussed. Traditional statistical models are also briefly reviewed for completeness. New challenges to the propagation prediction are described and some new approaches for meeting these challenges are presented.

534 citations


Performance
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Author's H-index: 1

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
19741