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P.J.M. van der Slot

Bio: P.J.M. van der Slot is an academic researcher from MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Laser & Free-electron laser. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 69 publications receiving 411 citations. Previous affiliations of P.J.M. van der Slot include Colorado State University & University of Twente.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A procedure for the simulation of free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators uses a combination of the MEDUSA simulation code for the FEL interaction and the OPC code to model the resonator.
Abstract: We describe a procedure for the simulation of free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators. The simulation uses a combination of the MEDUSA simulation code for the FEL interaction and the OPC code to model the resonator. The simulations are compared with recent observations of the oscillator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and are in substantial agreement with the experiment.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an analytic model of an APPLE-II undulator is presented to model arbitrary elliptical polarizations, which is used to treat general elliptical polarity.
Abstract: Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been built ranging in wavelength from long-wavelength oscillators using partial wave guiding through ultraviolet through hard x-ray that are either seeded or start from noise. In addition, FELs that produce different polarizations of the output radiation ranging from linear through elliptic to circular polarization are currently under study. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional, time-dependent formulation that is capable of modeling this large variety of FEL configurations including different polarizations. We employ a modal expansion for the optical field, i.e., a Gaussian expansion with variable polarization for free-space propagation. This formulation uses the full Newton–Lorentz force equations to track the particles through the optical and magnetostatic fields. As a result, arbitrary three-dimensional representations for different undulator configurations are implemented, including planar, helical, and elliptical undulators. In particular, we present an analytic model of an APPLE-II undulator to treat arbitrary elliptical polarizations, which is used to treat general elliptical polarizations. To model oscillator configurations, and allow propagation of the optical field outside the undulator and interact with optical elements, we link the FEL simulation with the optical propagation code OPC. We present simulations using the APPLE-II undulator model to produce elliptically polarized output radiation, and present a detailed comparison with recent experiments using a tapered undulator configuration at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Validation of the nonlinear formation is also shown by comparison with experimental results obtained in the Sorgente Pulsata Auto-amplificata di Radiazione Coerente SASE FEL experiment at ENEA Frascati, a seeded tapered amplifier experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the 10 kW upgrade oscillator experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an analytic model of an APPLE-II undulator is presented to model arbitrary elliptical polarizations of free-electron laser output radiation, including planar, helical, and elliptical undulators.
Abstract: Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been built ranging in wavelength from long-wavelength oscillators using partial wave guiding through ultraviolet through hard x-ray that are either seeded or start from noise (SASE). In addition, FELs that produce different polarizations of the output radiation ranging from linear through elliptic to circular polarization are currently under study. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional, time-dependent formulation that is capable of modeling this large variety of FEL configurations including different polarizations. We employ a modal expansion for the optical field, i.e., a Gaussian expansion with variable polarization for free-space propagation. This formulation uses the full Newton-Lorentz force equations to track the particles through the optical and magnetostatic fields. As a result, arbitrary three-dimensional representations for different undulator configurations are implemented, including planar, helical, and elliptical undulators. In particular, we present an analytic model of an APPLE-II undulator to treat arbitrary elliptical polarizations. To model oscillator configurations, and allow propagation of the optical field outside the undulator and interact with optical elements, we link the FEL simulation with the optical propagation code OPC. We present simulations using the APPLE-II undulator model to produce elliptically polarized output radiation, and present a detailed comparison with recent experiments using a tapered undulator configuration at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Validation of the nonlinear formation is also shown by comparison with experimental results obtained in the SPARC SASE FEL experiment at ENEA Frascati, a seeded tapered amplifier experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the 10-kW Upgrade Oscillator experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for example, Genesis 1.3 for FELs, is presented.
Abstract: Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for example, Genesis 1.3 for FELs, to model oscillators with full paraxial wave propagation within the resonator. A flexible scripting interface is used both to describe the optical resonator and to control the codes for propagation and amplification. To illustrate its capabilities, we numerically investigate two significantly different FEL oscillators: the free-electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX) system and the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV)-FEL oscillator of the proposed high-gain fourth generation light source. For the FELIX system, we find that diffraction losses are a considerable part of the single-pass cavity loss (at a wavelength of 40 µm). We also demonstrate that a resonator with hole coupling may be a viable alternative to a standard resonator with transmissive optics for the high gain VUV-FEL oscillator.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a self-seeding, tunable free-electron laser amplifier operating in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) region of the spectrum is presented.
Abstract: A proposal for a self-seeding, tunable free-electron laser amplifier operating in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) region of the spectrum is presented. Full three-dimensional (3D) modelling of the free electron laser and the optical feedback system has been carried out. Simulations demonstrate the generation of near transform limited radiation pulses with peak powers in the hundreds of megawatts. Preliminary 1D simulations show that by using a similar system it may be possible to extend such operation beyond the VUV to higher photon energies.

20 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1988-Nature
TL;DR: In this paper, a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) is presented.
Abstract: Deposits of clastic carbonate-dominated (calciclastic) sedimentary slope systems in the rock record have been identified mostly as linearly-consistent carbonate apron deposits, even though most ancient clastic carbonate slope deposits fit the submarine fan systems better. Calciclastic submarine fans are consequently rarely described and are poorly understood. Subsequently, very little is known especially in mud-dominated calciclastic submarine fan systems. Presented in this study are a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) that reveals a >250 m thick calciturbidite complex deposited in a calciclastic submarine fan setting. Seven facies are recognised from core and thin section characterisation and are grouped into three carbonate turbidite sequences. They include: 1) Calciturbidites, comprising mostly of highto low-density, wavy-laminated bioclast-rich facies; 2) low-density densite mudstones which are characterised by planar laminated and unlaminated muddominated facies; and 3) Calcidebrites which are muddy or hyper-concentrated debrisflow deposits occurring as poorly-sorted, chaotic, mud-supported floatstones. These

9,929 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This work shows that the spectral distribution and time-dependent decay of light emitted from excitons confined in the quantum dots are controlled by the host photonic crystal, providing a basis for all-solid-state dynamic control of optical quantum systems.
Abstract: Control of spontaneously emitted light lies at the heart of quantum optics. It is essential for diverse applications ranging from miniature lasers and light-emitting diodes, to single-photon sources for quantum information, and to solar energy harvesting. To explore such new quantum optics applications, a suitably tailored dielectric environment is required in which the vacuum fluctuations that control spontaneous emission can be manipulated. Photonic crystals provide such an environment: they strongly modify the vacuum fluctuations, causing the decay of emitted light to be accelerated or slowed down, to reveal unusual statistics, or to be completely inhibited in the ideal case of a photonic bandgap. Here we study spontaneous emission from semiconductor quantum dots embedded in inverse opal photonic crystals. We show that the spectral distribution and time-dependent decay of light emitted from excitons confined in the quantum dots are controlled by the host photonic crystal. Modified emission is observed over large frequency bandwidths of 10%, orders of magnitude larger than reported for resonant optical microcavities. Both inhibited and enhanced decay rates are observed depending on the optical emission frequency, and they are controlled by the crystals’ lattice parameter. Our experimental results provide a basis for all-solid-state dynamic control of optical quantum systems.

1,019 citations

Journal Article

755 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe how X-ray free-electron lasers work, discuss the range of new sources being developed worldwide, and consider how such Xray sources may develop over the coming years.
Abstract: With intensities 108–1010 times greater than other laboratory sources, X-ray free-electron lasers are currently opening up new frontiers across many areas of science. In this Review we describe how these unconventional lasers work, discuss the range of new sources being developed worldwide, and consider how such X-ray sources may develop over the coming years.

666 citations