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P. Steyn

Bio: P. Steyn is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Circaetus & Brown snake eagle. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 10 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1964-Ostrich
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the BROWN SNAKE-EAGLE CIRCAETUS CINEREUS and its role in the discovery of the Rainbow Serpent.
Abstract: (1964). OBSERVATIONS ON THE BROWN SNAKE-EAGLE CIRCAETUS CINEREUS. Ostrich: Vol. 35, No. 1, pp. 22-31.

10 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Of 683 identified prey items from five sources of data, over 80% consisted of domestic livestock; about 60% of this was sheep and goats, and birds nesting within conservation areas derived more than half of their food from domestic stock.
Abstract: When offered a selection of food items, bearded vultures Gypaetus barbatus in southern Africa chose bones in preference to meat or to feeding from a fleshed carcass. Once a carcass had been stripped of soft tissue by Gyps vultures, bearded vultures disarticulated sections or individual bones (depending on the size of the dead animal) in the order: limbs, ribs, vertebrae, skull. Their overall diet was estimated as 70% bone with marrow, 25% meat and 5% skin. This diet is about 15% higher in energy than an equivalent mass of meat. Of 683 identified prey items from five sources of data, over 80% consisted of domestic livestock; about 60% of this was sheep and goats. Even birds nesting within conservation areas derived more than half of their food from domestic stock which they found by foraging over adjacent commercial and subsistence farming areas. Bearded vultures obtain all their food by scavenging, and reports of attacks on live animals and even humans are rejected.

41 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1973-Ostrich

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1965-Ostrich
TL;DR: In this paper, some observations on the BATELEUR TERATHOPIUS ECAUDATUS (DAUDIN) Ostrich have been discussed and discussed.
Abstract: (1965). SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE BATELEUR TERATHOPIUS ECAUDATUS (DAUDIN) Ostrich: Vol. 36, No. 4, pp. 203-213.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1980-Ostrich
TL;DR: Three nesting territories of Bateleurs Terathopius ecaudatus were studied at Essexvale, Zimbabwe, from 1962 to 1976, and this paper augments previously published observations.
Abstract: Summary Steyn, P. 1980. Breeding and food of the Bateleur in Zimbabwe (Rhodesia). Ostrich 51:168-178 Three nesting territories of Bateleurs Terathopius ecaudatus were studied at Essexvale, Zimbabwe, from 1962 to 1976, and this paper augments previously published observations. Further details of breeding biology are given, and these show close similarities to those of snake eagles Circaetus spp. In 22 pair-years at Essexvale 17 young were reared, or 0,77 young/pair/year, and if combined with five years' observation at another nest in Zimbabwe then the figure is 0,81. A total of 238 prey items was collected, 47,5% birds, 42,0% mammals, 8,0% reptiles and 2,5% fish, and comparisons are made with three other studies of Bateleur prey. Evidence for direct predation is considered; Bateleurs kill many species of birds and a variety of mammals, but reptiles are not a significant aspect of diet. Carrion appears to be most important in the diet of immatures. The Bateleur has undergone a serious decline in South Afric...

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1972-Ostrich

9 citations