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Author

PA Bridgeford

Bio: PA Bridgeford is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nest & Ornithology. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 19 citations.
Topics: Nest, Ornithology

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: The timing of bird breeding in Namibia and the sizes of clutches and nesting colonies are presented per species, derived from 7 231 nest record cards, over 300 publications, museum and private egg collections and via personal communications.
Abstract: The timing of bird breeding in Namibia and the sizes of clutches and nesting colonies are presented per species, derived from 7 231 nest record cards, over 300 publications, museum and private egg collections and via personal communications.

21 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Raso Lark Alauda razae as mentioned in this paper is a single island endemic confined to the island of Raso in the Cape Verde islands and has been studied via short (11-20 day) similarly-timed visits every year from 2001 to 2017.
Abstract: The Raso Lark Alauda razae is a single island endemic confined to the island of Raso in the Cape Verde islands. It has been studied via short (11–20 day), similarly-timed visits every year from 2001 to 2017. These November/December visits have occurred towards the end of the main rainy period (August–October) in the Cape Verdes. Average clutch size ranged from zero (no nests found) to 3.57 in different years and was strongly correlated with rainfall in the three months preceding the year’s visit, but not with population size, which varied 25-fold during the study period. Since the nomadic pursuit of rain is not an option for the Raso Lark, the species adjusts clutch size according to conditions prevailing on Raso.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work was funded by the University of Pretoria and the National Research Foundation of South Africa and was conducted with the help of a grant from the US National Institutes of Health.
Abstract: NIH GM083863 (to Wayne Getz). Ivan Horak was funded by the University of Pretoria and the National Research Foundation of South Africa.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2019-Ostrich
TL;DR: In an extensive literature search, a total of 16 raptor species were recorded as nesting on top of large weaver nests as discussed by the authors, including Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver Bubalornis niger and 25.7% of Sociable Weaver Philetairus socius nests.
Abstract: Several raptor species nest on top of large weaver nests. These weaver nests are usually sited in trees, but 11.7% of Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver Bubalornis niger and 25.7% of Sociable Weaver Philetairus socius nests occur on man-made structures. In an extensive literature search, a total of 16 raptor species were recorded as nesting on top of weaver nests. At least 10 raptor species used weaver nests built in trees. Seven raptor species used weaver nests on man-made sites and four raptor species only used weaver nests built on man-made sites. No owls have been recorded as using weaver nests on man-made sites. There are historical records of raptors nesting on top of weaver nests in trees, while nesting on top of weaver nests sited on man-made structures appears to be a more recent adaptation. Costs and benefits of nesting on man-made sites are briefly listed. Nesting on man-made sites may increase (by both weavers and raptors) and raptor researchers are encouraged to document cases of raptors nesting on we...

6 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In Africa, human populations have expanded and urbanized across the continent, creating an abundance of myna habitat, and, perhaps more importantly, creating a network of habitat corridors through the building of roads and towns along those roads as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: It will be fascinating to monitor their spread, which will no doubt continue, across Africa. Human populations have expanded and urbanized across the continent, creating an abundance of myna habitat, and, perhaps more importantly, creating a network of habitat corridors through the building of roads and towns along those roads.

3 citations