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Pamela Jagger

Bio: Pamela Jagger is an academic researcher from University of Michigan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Household income & Land management. The author has an hindex of 33, co-authored 77 publications receiving 3667 citations. Previous affiliations of Pamela Jagger include Center for International Forestry Research & Agricultural & Applied Economics Association.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results from a comparative analysis of environmental income from approximately 8000 households in 24 developing countries collected by research partners in CIFOR’s Poverty Environment Network (PEN).

842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors review the ecological debate surrounding the planting of eucalyptus trees and conclude that a policy option favoring the allocation of wastelands for private tree planting offers the greatest opportunity for rural smallholders.

273 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, a structural econometric model of household decisions regarding income strategies, participation in programs and organizations, crop choices, land management, and labor use, and their implications for agricultural production and land degradation is presented.
Abstract: This paper estimates a structural econometric model of household decisions regarding income strategies, participation in programs and organizations, crop choices, land management, and labor use, and their implications for agricultural production and land degradation; based upon a survey of over 450 households and their farm plots in Uganda. The results generally support the Boserupian model of population-induced agricultural intensification, but do not support the .more people-less erosion. hypothesis, with population pressure found to contribute to erosion in the densely populated highlands. Agricultural technical assistance programs have location-specific impacts on agricultural production and land degradation, contributing to higher value of crop production in the lowlands, but to soil erosion in the highlands. By contrast, NGO programs focusing on agriculture and environment are helping to reduce erosion, but have mixed impacts on production. We find little evidence of impact of access to markets, roads and credit, land tenure or title on agricultural intensification and crop production, though road access appears to contribute to land degradation in the highlands. Education increases household incomes, but also reduces crop production in the lowlands. We do not find evidence of a poverty-land degradation trap, while poverty has mixed impacts on agricultural production: smaller farms obtain higher crop production per hectare, while households with fewer livestock have crop production. These findings suggest that development of factor markets can improve agricultural efficiency. Several other factors that contribute to increased value of crop production, without significant impacts on land degradation, include specialized crop production, livestock and nonfarm income strategies, and irrigation. In general, the results imply that the strategies to increase agricultural production and reduce land degradation must be location-specific, and that there are few .win-win. opportunities to simultaneously increase production and reduce land degradation.

179 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the patterns and determinants of change in income strategies, land management, resource and human welfare conditions in Uganda since 1990, based upon a community-level survey conducted in 107 villages, were investigated.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the body of literature that makes claims about the socioeconomic and biophysical impacts of pre-REDD+ projects and conclude that drawing specific lessons from pre-Redd+ projects for the design or evaluation of current REDD++ projects is tenuous.

171 citations


Cited by
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01 Feb 2016

1,970 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify three categories of challenges that have to be addressed to maintain and enhance human health in the face of increasingly harmful environmental trends: conceptual and empathy failures (imagination challenges), such as an overreliance on gross domestic product as a measure of human progress, the failure to account for future health and environmental harms over present day gains, and the disproportionate eff ect of those harms on the poor and those in developing nations.

1,452 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results from a comparative analysis of environmental income from approximately 8000 households in 24 developing countries collected by research partners in CIFOR’s Poverty Environment Network (PEN).

842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the importance of structural components and regularities in the relationship between livelihood opportunities and decision-making and propose livelihood trajectories as an appropriate methodology for examining these issues.
Abstract: This article discusses the value of livelihoods studies and examines the obstacles which have prevented it from making a greater contribution to understanding the lives of poor people over the past decade. After examining the roots of the livelihoods approach, two major challenges are explored: the conceptualization of the problem of access, and how to achieve a better understanding of the mutual link between livelihood opportunities and decision-making. The article concludes that access to livelihood opportunities is governed by social relations, institutions and organizations, and that power is an important (and sometimes overlooked) explanatory variable. In discussing the issue of access to livelihood opportunities, the authors note the occurrence of both strategic and unintentional behaviour and the importance of structural factors; they discuss concepts of styles and pathways, which try to cater for structural components and regularities; and they propose livelihood trajectories as an appropriate methodology for examining these issues. In this way, the article also sets the agenda for future livelihoods research.

725 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jul 2018-Nature
TL;DR: It is overwhelmingly that the interventions improved the sustainability of China’s rural land systems, but the impacts are nuanced and adverse outcomes have occurred.
Abstract: China has responded to a national land-system sustainability emergency via an integrated portfolio of large-scale programmes. Here we review 16 sustainability programmes, which invested US$378.5 billion (in 2015 US$), covered 623.9 million hectares of land and involved over 500 million people, mostly since 1998. We find overwhelmingly that the interventions improved the sustainability of China’s rural land systems, but the impacts are nuanced and adverse outcomes have occurred. We identify some key characteristics of programme success, potential risks to their durability, and future research needs. We suggest directions for China and other nations as they progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations’ Agenda 2030.

702 citations