scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Pasha Mohamad Khan

Bio: Pasha Mohamad Khan is an academic researcher from McGill University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Persian literature & Urdu. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the reception and genre of the Shāhnāmah in India is considered, and a methodological split in the historiographical corpus is proposed, between a rationalist (aqli) and transmission-based (naqli) method.
Abstract: This article considers the reception and genre of the Shāhnāmah in India. It takes as its starting-point comments made by the poet Mirza Asad Allah Khan Ghalib in 1866, moving on to look at a Mughal Shāhnāmah adaptation, the Tarikh-i dil-gusha-i Shamsher-Khani, and its Urdu translations, as well as other Persian, Urdu and Arabic texts. It investigates the (mis)identification of the Shāhnāmah’s genre, looking at cases in which it was understood as historiographical rather than as a romance, and seeking an explanation for this ‘contamination’ of the sincere genre of history by the mendacious romance genre. A methodological split in the historiographical corpus is proposed, between a rationalist (‘aqli) and transmission-based (naqli) method. The contest between these two methods is considered, and the prevalence of transmission-based history and its similarity to romance is brought forward as a possible reason for the porousness of the border between these ostensibly opposing genres.

8 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Jabbari as discussed by the authors argues for a shared discourse of modernity shared between early twentieth-century Iranian and Indian intellectuals, and examines how these intellectuals made use of premodern materials for their modernizing projects, and how nationalism shaped this process.
Abstract: This article makes an argument for literary modernity as a shared discourse produced through scholarly exchange between Iranians and Indians reworking their shared Persianate literary heritage, considering literary history as an important and perhaps overlooked site for the production of literary modernity. Arguing for a verbal as well as textual discourse of modernity shared between early twentieth-century Iranian and Indian intellectuals, Jabbari examines how these intellectuals made use of premodern materials for their modernizing projects, and how nationalism shaped this process. Four aspects of modern literary history writing receive particular focus here: engagement with the tazkirah tradition, inclusion of extraliterary national figures alongside poets, use of a shared set of references and sources, and new sexual aesthetics that break with the homoerotic Persianate past.

14 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kaynian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi).
Abstract: This paper aims to examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kayānian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi). For this purpose it will discuss the thematic properties of the Dāstān-e Goshtāsp (Tale of Goshtāsp) in the light of Iranian historical and epic traditions. Given the religious subject matter of the advent of Zoroaster, my aim is also to explore whether Daqiqi’s account primarily has a religious orientation or is the manifestation of a more secular orientation which represents the taste of kings and nobles with an emphasis on heroic events. The question of the Zoroastrian orientation of Daqiqi’s narrative is especially interesting given that the Shāhnāme was commissioned by an Iranian Muslim monarch and primarily addressed an audience of Persian-speaking Muslims albeit conscious of their national heritage. Of specific interest in my presentation is Daqiqi’s handling of the Sistānian heroic tradition and its hostility to Zoroaster’s patron, and whether there are any important ideological differences between Daqiqi and Ferdowsi in this respect.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the polymath writer ʿAbbās Qulī Āghā Bākīkhānūf (1794-1847), who conceptualized community outside the framework of the nation, while conjoining distinctive strands of epistemic and cultural cosmopolitanism.
Abstract: This article engages with cosmopolitan conceptions of culture that flourished in the nineteenth century Caucasus with a view to clarifying the relevance of these legacies today. I focus in particular on the polymath writer ʿAbbās Qulī Āghā Bākīkhānūf (1794–1847). Bākīkhānūf’s historical work conceptualizes community outside the framework of the nation, while conjoining distinctive strands of epistemic and cultural cosmopolitanism. As I explore Bākīkhānūf’s historical writing, I consider how the Persianate literary tradition of which he partakes advance a cosmopolitan conception of community that contrasts with and occasionally contests the nationalist histories promulgated by modern European nations. As a scientific and literary project, Bākīkhānūf’s cosmological cosmopolitanism shows how epistemic openness advances cultural inclusivity, in part by recognizing the relationship between the literary imagination and scientific inquiry.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines how the Persian prison poem ( habsiyat ) incorporated Islamic legal norms for governing non-Muslim peoples into its poetics, and demonstrates how Persian poetics of incarceration coalesced into a powerful internal critique of Islamic law.
Abstract: This article examines how the Persian prison poem ( habsiyāt ) incorporated Islamic legal norms for governing non-Muslim peoples into its poetics. By tracing how Khāqāni of Shirvān (d. 1199) brought the aesthetics of incarceration to bear on Islamic legal regulations pertaining to non-Muslim communities ( ahl al-zemma ), I offer a new perspective on the politics of poetry in Persian culture. As I delineate the intertextual references to legal stipulations ( shorut ) pertaining to non-Muslims that suffuse Khāqāni’s Christian qasida , I demonstrate how the Persian poetics of incarceration coalesced into a powerful internal critique of Islamic law.

7 citations