scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Patricia Schnoor

Bio: Patricia Schnoor is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ionosphere & Physics. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 28 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that the emerging technology of low-level laser therapy may play a potentially significant role in health care providers' armamentarium for the disease androgenic alopecia.
Abstract: Background Photobiomodulation, also referred to as low-level laser therapy (LLLT), has been studied and used for (among other diseases) the promotion of hair regrowth. Objective/materials and methods/results A clinical study was developed to define the physiologic effects that occur when the human hair follicle and surrounding tissue structures are exposed to laser light using a novel device that is fitted with an array of laser diode sources operating at 650 nm and placed inside a sports cap to promote discretion while in use. The study demonstrates that low-level laser treatment of the scalp every other day for 17 weeks using the HANDI-DOME LASER device is a safe and effective treatment for androgenetic alopecia in healthy females between the ages of 18 to 60 with Fitzpatrick skin Types I to IV and Ludwig-Savin Baldness Scale I-2 to II-2 baldness patterns. Subjects receiving LLLT at 650 nm achieved a 51% increase in hair counts as compared with sham-treated control patients in this multicenter randomized controlled trial. Conclusion These results suggest that the emerging technology of low-level laser therapy may play a potentially significant role in health care providers' armamentarium for the disease androgenic alopecia.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the first report of global ionospheric disturbances due to the most powerful Gamma Ray Burst GRB221009A occurred on 9 October 2022, and both daytime and nighttime effects were analyzed in VLF and LF bands.
Abstract: We present the first report of global ionospheric disturbances due to the most powerful Gamma Ray Burst GRB221009A occurred on 9 October 2022. Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Low Frequency (LF) sub-ionospheric radio signals are used to diagnose the effect of the GRB on the lower ionosphere. Both daytime and nighttime effects are analyzed in VLF and LF bands. The magnitude of VLF signal perturbations varied with the propagation condition (day/night), path length, and frequency of the signal. The recovery times for the VLF/LF signals to get back to their pre-GRB levels varied from 2–60 min. Radio signals reflected from the E-region ionosphere for nighttime VLF signals and daytime LF signals showed greater effects compared to the daytime VLF signals reflected from the lower parts of the D-region.

2 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of this NMA indicate the emergence of novel, non‐hormonal therapies as effective treatments for hair loss; however, the quality of evidence is generally low.
Abstract: Androgenetic alopecia, or male/female pattern baldness, is the most common type of progressive hair loss disorder. The aim of this study was to review recent advances in non‐surgical treatments for androgenetic alopecia and identify the most effective treatments. A network meta‐analysis (NMA) was conducted of the available literature of the six most common non‐surgical treatment options for treating androgenetic alopecia in both men and women; dutasteride 0.5 mg, finasteride 1 mg, low‐level laser therapy (LLLT), minoxidil 2%, minoxidil 5% and platelet‐rich plasma (PRP). Seventy‐eight studies met the inclusion criteria, and 22 studies had the data necessary for a network meta‐analysis. Relative effects show LLLT as the superior treatment. Relative effects show PRP, finasteride 1 mg (male), finasteride 1 mg (female), minoxidil 5%, minoxidil 2% and dutasteride (male) are approximately equivalent in mean change hair count following treatment. Minoxidil 5% and minoxidil 2% reported the most drug‐related adverse events (n = 45 and n = 23, respectively). The quality of evidence of minoxidil 2% vs. minoxidil 5% was high; minoxidil 5% vs. placebo was moderate; dutasteride (male) vs. placebo, finasteride (female) vs. placebo, minoxidil 2% vs. placebo and minoxidil 5% vs. LLLT was low; and finasteride (male) vs. placebo, LLLT vs. sham, PRP vs. placebo and finasteride vs. minoxidil 2% was very low. Results of this NMA indicate the emergence of novel, non‐hormonal therapies as effective treatments for hair loss; however, the quality of evidence is generally low. High‐quality randomized controlled trials and head‐to‐head trials are required to support these findings and aid in the development of more standardized protocols, particularly for PRP. Regardless, this analysis may aid physicians in clinical decision‐making and highlight the variety of non‐surgical hair restoration options for patients.

59 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The novel helmet-type LLLT device appears to be an effective treatment option for AGA in both male and female patients with minimal adverse effects, and the limitations of this study are small sample size, no long-term follow-up data, and use of inappropriate sham devices, which do not reflect the true negative control.
Abstract: Low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT) has been increasingly used for promoting hair growth in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Our institute developed a new home-use LLLT device, RAMACAP, with optimal penetrating energy, aiming to improve therapeutic efficacy and compliance. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new helmet-type LLLT device in the treatment of AGA, a 24-week, prospective, randomized, double-blind, sham device-controlled clinical trial was conducted. Forty subjects with AGA (20 men and 20 women) were randomized to treat with a laser helmet (RAMACAP) or a sham helmet in the home-based setting for 24 weeks. Hair density, hair diameter, and adverse events were evaluated at baseline and at weeks 8, 16, and 24. Global photographic assessment for hair regrowth after 24 weeks of treatment was performed by investigators and subjects. Thirty-six subjects (19 in the laser group and 17 in the sham group) completed the study. At week 24, the laser helmet was significantly superior to the sham device for increasing hair density and hair diameter (p = 0.002 and p = 0.009, respectively) and showed a significantly greater improvement in global photographic assessment by investigators and subjects. Reported side effects included temporary hair shedding and scalp pruritus. In conclusion, the novel helmet-type LLLT device appears to be an effective treatment option for AGA in both male and female patients with minimal adverse effects. However, the limitations of this study are small sample size, no long-term follow-up data, and use of inappropriate sham devices, which do not reflect the true negative control. Trial registration: http://clinicaltrials.in.th/index.php?tp=regtrials&menu=trialsearch&smenu=fulltext&task=search&task2=view1&id=2061 , identifier TCTR20160910003.

58 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: LLLT appears to be a safe, alternative treatment for patients with androgenic alopecia and more research needs to be undertaken to determine the optimal power and wavelength to use in LLLT as well as L LLT’s mechanism of action.
Abstract: There are many new low-level laser technologies that have been released commercially that claim to support hair regrowth. In this paper, we will examine the clinical trials to determine whether the body of evidence supports the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to treat androgenic alopecia (AGA). A literature search was conducted through Pubmed, Embase, and Clinicaltrials.gov for clinical trials using LLLT to treat AGA. Thirteen clinical trials were assessed. Review articles were not included. Ten of 11 trials demonstrated significant improvement of androgenic alopecia in comparison to baseline or controls when treated with LLLT. In the remaining study, improvement in hair counts and hair diameter was recorded, but did not reach statistical significance. Two trials did not include statistical analysis, but showed marked improvement by hair count or by photographic evidence. Two trials showed efficacy for LLLT in combination with topical minoxidil. One trial showed efficacy when accompanying finasteride treatment. LLLT appears to be a safe, alternative treatment for patients with androgenic alopecia. Clinical trials have indicated efficacy for androgenic alopecia in both men and women. It may be used independently or as an adjuvant of minoxidil or finasteride. More research needs to be undertaken to determine the optimal power and wavelength to use in LLLT as well as LLLT's mechanism of action.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of LLLT might be an effective, safe, well-tolerated treatment for androgenetic alopecia patients.
Abstract: BACKGROUNDPrevious studies have reported the benefits of low-level/light laser therapy (LLLT) for the promotion of hair regrowth. However, the effectiveness of LLLT for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is still a topic of debate.OBJECTIVETo investigate the efficacy and safety of LLLT on

33 citations