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Patrick J. Glen

Bio: Patrick J. Glen is an academic researcher from Government of the United States of America. The author has contributed to research in topics: Immigration law & Supreme court. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 27 publications receiving 90 citations. Previous affiliations of Patrick J. Glen include University of California, Berkeley & Georgetown University.

Papers
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TL;DR: The African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance (ACOG) as mentioned in this paper is a comprehensive regional attempt to promote, protect, and consolidate democracy that entered into force in February 2012 and represents the AU's attempt to institutionalize principles of good governance and democratic ideals.
Abstract: This article provides an exegesis of the recently entered-into-force African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance Democracy has a decidedly mixed history in Africa and, despite a concerted effort by the African Union (AU), it has made only halting inroads in those states that are nondemocratic or struggling to consolidate democracy That may change as more states ratify and implement the Charter, a comprehensive regional attempt to promote, protect, and consolidate democracy that entered into force in February 2012 This Charter, the culmination of two decades of African thinking on how democracy should develop on the continent, represents the AU’s attempt to institutionalize principles of good governance and democratic ideals Although hurdles remain on Africa’s road to democratic development, including poverty, illiteracy, and corruption, the Charter provides a means to address these stubborn problems Whether it will succeed will depend on state implementation of the obligations undertaken by ratification of the Charter, as well as the African Union’s own commitment to ensuring observation of the Charter’s key provisions If the AU and its member states do fully implement and practically observe the Charter’s obligations, then the prospects for democratic governance in Africa have a bright future

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance (ACOG) as discussed by the authors is a comprehensive regional attempt to promote, protect, and consolidate democracy that entered into force in February 2012.
Abstract: This article provides an exegesis of the recently entered-into-force African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance. Democracy has a decidedly mixed history in Africa and, despite a concerted effort by the African Union (AU), it has made only halting inroads in those states that are nondemocratic or struggling to consolidate democracy. That may change as more states ratify and implement the Charter, a comprehensive regional attempt to promote, protect, and consolidate democracy that entered into force in February 2012. This Charter, the culmination of two decades of African thinking on how democracy should develop on the continent, represents the AU’s attempt to institutionalize principles of good governance and democratic ideals. Although hurdles remain on Africa’s road to democratic development, including poverty, illiteracy, and corruption, the Charter provides a means to address these stubborn problems. Whether it will succeed will depend on state implementation of the obligations undertaken by ratification of the Charter, as well as the AU’s own commitment to ensuring observation of the Charter’s key provisions. If the AU and its member states do fully implement and practically observe the Charter’s obligations, then the prospects for democratic governance in Africa have a bright future.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The United Kingdom's approach is unduly biased towards non-removability, whereas the standards for establishing relief from removal in the United States are onerous and will be rarely met in practice.
Abstract: The massive influx of illegal immigrants over the preceding decades has combined with the United States’ jus soli citizenship regime to produce a growing class of removable aliens: non-citizen parents of United States citizen children. The removability of parents obviously places the citizen children in the unfortunate position of having to leave their country of citizenship behind to accompany the parents, or arrange for living situations within the United States, perhaps with a relative, but be separated from their parents. The compelling interests raised by the removability of parents in such circumstances have given rise to distinct forms of relief under domestic legal systems. The United Kingdom, in a recent decision by its Supreme Court, has held that the best interests of the child are a primary consideration in determining whether the removal of the parent would be proportionate. Likewise, the United States provides for certain types of relief from removal for the parents of United States citizen children. Yet neither regime is entirely satisfactory. The United Kingdom’s approach is unduly biased towards non-removability, whereas the standards for establishing relief from removal in the United States are onerous and will be rarely met in practice. The purpose of this article is to propose a balancing of the interests that takes a realistic look both at the compelling interest citizen children have to remain in their country as part of a family unit and the competing interests of the state in a fully and fairly functioning immigration system. Such balancing is liable to make all parties unhappy - not every non-citizen parent should be permitted to remain simply on the fact of that parentage, and, conversely, not every removable parent should be removed simply because they are present illegally - yet it is the only feasible option to a problem that is only likely to grow in the coming decades.

9 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine whether the filing of form 4's under the '34 Act has a particular effect on the movement of securities prices and the ultimate results are then analyzed under traditional market theories, which are introduced earlier in the paper.
Abstract: This article is primarily an examination of whether the filing of form 4's under the '34 Act has a particular effect on the movement of securities prices. The ultimate results are then analyzed under traditional market theories, which are introduced earlier in the paper. The main question presented is the worth of information for traders. If chaos theory is correct in the weight it gives to information, then the filing requirements become very important, as does any movement that could be associated with those requirements. The paper is an initial step in an area that has not been addressed to a large extent, and could serve as the departure point for more rigorous empirical study of the questions presented.

8 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This Article concludes that while health coverage for illegal immigrants is not required under prevailing constitutional norms, extending coverage as a matter of policy would serve the broader interests of the United States.
Abstract: The question of whether illegal immigrants should be entitled to some form of health coverage in the United States sits at the uneasy intersection of two contentious debates: health reform and immigration reform. Befitting this place, the rhetoric surrounding the issue has been exponentially heightened by the multiplying effects of combining two vitriolic debates. On one side, it is argued that the United States has a moral obligation to provide health care to all those within its borders needing such assistance. On the other, it is argued with equal force that those illegally present in this country should not be entitled to take advantage of public benefits. Rather than meaningfully engaging each other, these sides simply square off across a chasm of absolutes. The purpose of this article is to chart a middle course between these extremes that focuses on the practical aspects of the issue while relegating hyperbole and high-minded moral claims to the side. It seeks to answer two questions: First, whether extending health coverage to illegal immigrants is mandated by Constitutional law? Second, whether there are compelling policy reasons for extending such coverage, even if extending coverage is not legally mandated? The conclusion of this article is that while health coverage for illegal immigrants is not required under prevailing constitutional norms, extending coverage as a matter of policy would serve the broader interests of the United States. Extending coverage would be beneficial both as a matter of economics and public health, meaning the spillover benefits to extending coverage would reach all U.S. citizens and all those already entrenched in the U.S. health care and health insurance systems. Although it seems unlikely that the recommendations of this article will, in reality, bridge the gaps between the warring sides, its benefits lay in its pragmatic and practical sketch of how a solution may be reached. Thus, at the least, it presents a blue-print on how best to approach this contentious issue.

7 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is demonstrated how current economic and social systems can adapt to existing pressures and shift towards ocean stewardship through incorporation of niche innovations within and across economic sectors and stakeholder communities.
Abstract: Human wellbeing relies on the Biosphere, including natural resources provided by ocean ecosystems. As multiple demands and stressors threaten the ocean, transformative change in ocean governance is required to maintain the contributions of the ocean to people. Here we illustrate how transition theory can be applied to ocean governance. We demonstrate how current economic and social systems can adapt to existing pressures and shift towards ocean stewardship through incorporation of niche innovations within and across economic sectors and stakeholder communities. These novel approaches support an emergent but purposeful transition and suggest a clear path to a thriving and vibrant relationship between humans and the ocean. Oceans provide important natural resources, but the management and governance of the ocean is complex and the ecosystem is suffering as a result. The authors discuss current barriers to sustainable ocean governance and suggest pathways forward. Oceans provide important natural resources, but the management and governance of the ocean is complex and the ecosystem is suffering as a result. The authors discuss current barriers to sustainable ocean governance and suggest pathways forward.

89 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of "uniformity" and "uncertainty" in the context of video games.2.3.2
Abstract: 2

66 citations

Book
16 May 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors assess the extent to which these challenges may be overcome by greater engagement between international refugee law and international law on the rights of the child, and the result is the first comprehensive study on the manner in which these two mutually reinforcing legal regimes can interact to strengthen the protection of refugee children.
Abstract: Children are the victims of some of the most devastating examples of state-sanctioned and private human rights abuse. In increasing numbers, they are attempting to find international protection, and are forced to navigate complex administrative and legal processes that fail to take into account their distinct needs and vulnerabilities. The key challenges they face in establishing entitlement to refugee protection are their invisibility and the risk of incorrect assessment. Drawing on an extensive and original analysis of jurisprudence of leading common law jurisdictions, this book undertakes an assessment of the extent to which these challenges may be overcome by greater engagement between international refugee law and international law on the rights of the child. The result is the first comprehensive study on the manner in which these two mutually reinforcing legal regimes can interact to strengthen the protection of refugee children.

56 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) as discussed by the authors is a complex set of interrelated and overlapping institutions with mandates spanning the entire conflict management spectrum from preventive diplomacy to postwar reconstruction, including the African Standby Force, the Continental Early Warning System, the Peace Fund, the Panel of the Wise, and the relevant Regional Economic Communities, regional mechanisms, and parts of the African Union Commission involved in these institutions.
Abstract: In the twenty-first century, African states and a wide range of partners have made considerable progress in constructing the African Peace and Security Architecture––a complex set of interrelated and overlapping institutions with mandates spanning the entire conflict management spectrum from preventive diplomacy to postwar reconstruction. Specifically, as used here, the African Peace and Security Architecture refers to the Peace and Security Council of the African Union, the African Standby Force, the Continental Early Warning System, the Peace Fund, the Panel of the Wise, and the relevant Regional Economic Communities, regional mechanisms, and parts of the African Union Commission involved in these institutions. This article reflects on the evolution of these institutions and highlights some of the main areas of progress as well as the challenges encountered along the way.

26 citations

12 Sep 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the approaches and strategies used by the US and the EU to support democracy, and find that they are often quite different and, in some respects, clashing.
Abstract: The United States of America and the institutions of the European Union are the most prominent democracy assistance donors in third countries. Over the last two decades, they have spent tens of billions of dollars to support the formation and consolidation of democratic regimes around the world. In this sense, the US and the EU have seemingly shared interests – i.e. seeking to build democratic institutions in target countries so that these become part of the community of democracies and contribute to the stability of the world’s economic and political system. However, if we look at the approaches and strategies used by the US and the EU to support democracy, we find that they are often quite different and, in some respects, clashing. Why are the approaches of both actors different if they strive to reach the same goal? Or – upon closer examination – are their goals indeed somewhat different? The key problem is that democracy as such is a contested concept, so it is necessary to ask the question: if we are promoting democracy, what kind of democracy do we mean? If we finance the development of one or the other institution, what model of democratic establishment will be created? The thesis takes a constructivist view of this issue and demonstrates how the different democratic identities of the two actors create different views on the process of democratic transformation and, consequently, informs the actors’ approaches to the policy of democracy assistance. The first part of this dissertation deals with the discussion of models of democracy and creates a typology of approaches to democracy assistance. The second part examines the democratic identity of both actors – that is, the influence of different political philosophies on their contemporary perceptions of democracy, their conceptions of the role of the state in an individual’s life and the sources of the legitimacy to govern for democratic regimes. The third part links previous theoretical knowledge to practice – it describes the concepts and definitions of democracy in US and EU primary guiding documents and instruments designed to support democracy in third countries and demonstrates how the specific

21 citations