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Author

Patrick Joyce

Other affiliations: University of Western Sydney
Bio: Patrick Joyce is an academic researcher from University of Manchester. The author has contributed to research in topics: Work (electrical) & Social history. The author has an hindex of 20, co-authored 48 publications receiving 2135 citations. Previous affiliations of Patrick Joyce include University of Western Sydney.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the impersonal, often invisible forms of social direction and control built into the infrastructure of modern life and the ways in which these mechanisms both shape culture and social life and engender popular resistance.
Abstract: The liberal governance of the nineteenth-century state and city depended on the "rule of freedom". As a form of rule it relied on the production of certain kinds of citizens and patterns of social life, which in turn depended on transforming both the material form of the city (its layout, architecture, infrastructure) and the ways it was inhabited and imagined by its leaders, citizens and custodians. Focusing mainly on London and Manchester, but with reference also to Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Vienna, colonial India, and even contemporary Los Angeles, Patrick Joyce creatively and originally develops Foucauldian approaches to historiography to reflect on the nature of modern liberal society. His consideration of such "artifacts" as maps and censuses, sewers and markets, public libraries and parks, and of civic governments and city planning, are intertwined with theoretical interpretations to examine both the impersonal, often invisible forms of social direction and control built into the infrastructure of modern life and the ways in which these mechanisms both shape culture and social life and engender popular resistance.

356 citations

Book
21 Oct 1993
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the making of the English working class before 1914 Appendices and their relationship with popular culture and the social order in the UK, including the broadside ballad and the sense of the past.
Abstract: 1. Introduction Part I. Power and the People: Politics and the Social Order: 2. The languages of popular politics: from radicalism to Liberalism 3. Class, populism and socialism: Liberalism and after Part II. Moralising the Market: Work and the Social Order: 4. Civilising capital: class and the moral discources of labour 5. Buiding the union: 'the gospel of absolute and perfect organisation' Part III. Custom, History, Language: Popular Culture and the Social Order 6. Custom and the symbolic structure of the social order 7. The sense of the past 8. The people's English Part IV. Kingdoms of the Mind: The Imaginary Constitution of the Social Order: 9. Investigating popular art 10. The broadside ballad 11. The voice of the people? The character and development of dialect literature 12. Dialect and the making of social identity 13. Stages of class: popular theatre and the geography of belonging 14. Summary and conclusion: the making of the English working class before 1914 Appendices.

235 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The authors explored the nature of class identity by looking at the formation and influence of two men (Edwin Waugh and John Bright) who might be taken as representative of what 'working class' and'middle class' meant in England in the nineteenth century.
Abstract: This pioneering and original study explores critically the nature of class identity by looking at the formation and influence of two men (Edwin Waugh and John Bright) who might be taken as representative of what 'working class' and 'middle class' meant in England in the nineteenth century. The two studies of individuals are complemented by a further study on narrative in pointing to the great importance of the collective subjects upon which democracy rested. The book indicates the way forward to a new history of democracy as an imagined entity. It represents a deepening of Patrick Joyce's engagement with 'post-modernist' theory, seeking the relevance of this theory for the writing of history, and in the process offering a critique of the conservatism of much academic history, particularly in Britain.

137 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gilligan translated this question into research by subjecting the abstraction of universal and discrete agency to comparative research into female behavior evaluated on its own terms and revealed women to be more concrete in their thinking and more attuned to "fairness" while men acted on abstract reasoning and "rules of justice" as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: justice. Women, by contrast, were believed to be at a lower stage because they were found to have a sense of agency still tied primarily to their social relationships and to make political and moral decisions based on context-specific principles based on these relationships rather than on the grounds of their own autonomous judgments. Students of gender studies know well just how busy social scientists have been kept by their efforts to come up with ever more sociological "alibis" for the question of why women did not act like men. Gilligan's response was to refuse the terms of the debate altogether. She thus did not develop yet another explanation for why women are "deviant." Instead, she turned the question on its head by asking what was wrong with the theory a theory whose central premises defines 50% of social beings as "abnormal." Gilligan translated this question into research by subjecting the abstraction of universal and discrete agency to comparative research into female behavior evaluated on its own terms The new research revealed women to be more "concrete" in their thinking and more attuned to "fairness" while men acted on "abstract reasoning" and "rules of justice." These research findings transformed female otherness into variation and difference but difference now freed from the normative de-

2,345 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: The sources of social power trace their interrelations throughout human history as discussed by the authors, from neolithic times, through ancient Near Eastern civilizations, the classical Mediterranean age and medieval Europe up to just before the Industrial Revolution in England.
Abstract: Distinguishing four sources of power in human societies – ideological, economic, military and political – The Sources of Social Power traces their interrelations throughout human history In this first volume, Michael Mann examines interrelations between these elements from neolithic times, through ancient Near Eastern civilizations, the classical Mediterranean age and medieval Europe, up to just before the Industrial Revolution in England It offers explanations of the emergence of the state and social stratification; of city-states, militaristic empires and the persistent interaction between them; of the world salvation religions; and of the particular dynamism of medieval and early modern Europe It ends by generalizing about the nature of overall social development, the varying forms of social cohesion and the role of classes and class struggle in history First published in 1986, this new edition of Volume 1 includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of the work

2,186 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the first two volumes of this work, Paul Ricoeur examined the relations between time and narrative in historical writing, fiction, and theories of literature as discussed by the authors, and this final volume, a comprehensive reexamination and synthesis of the ideas developed in volumes 1 and 2, stands as Ricoeure's most complete and satisfying presentation of his own philosophy.
Abstract: In the first two volumes of this work, Paul Ricoeur examined the relations between time and narrative in historical writing, fiction, and theories of literature. This final volume, a comprehensive reexamination and synthesis of the ideas developed in volumes 1 and 2, stands as Ricoeur's most complete and satisfying presentation of his own philosophy.

2,047 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Brian Larkin1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the range of anthropological literature that seeks to theorize infrastructure by drawing on biopolitics, science and technology studies, and theories of technopolitics.
Abstract: Infrastructures are material forms that allow for the possibility of exchange over space. They are the physical networks through which goods, ideas, waste, power, people, and finance are trafficked. In this article I trace the range of anthropological literature that seeks to theorize infrastructure by drawing on biopolitics, science and technology studies, and theories of technopolitics. I also examine other dimensions of infrastructures that release different meanings and structure politics in various ways: through the aesthetic and the sensorial, desire and promise.

1,615 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Two very powerful stories structure the history of the changing roles of English women as mentioned in this paper : the tale of the nineteenth-century separation of the spheres of public power and private domesticity relates principally to the experience of middle-class women.
Abstract: Two very powerful stories structure the history of the changing roles of English women. The tale of the nineteenth-century separation of the spheres of public power and private domesticity relates principally to the experience of middle-class women. The other story, emerging from early modern scholarship, recounts the social and economic marginalization of propertied women and the degradation of working women as a consequence of capitalism. Both narratives echo each other in important ways, although strangely the capacity of women's history to repeat itself is rarely openly discussed. This paper critically reviews the two historiographies in order to open debate on the basic categories and chronologies we employ in discussing the experience, power and identity of women in past time.

709 citations