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Paul L. Wachtel

Bio: Paul L. Wachtel is an academic researcher from City College of New York. The author has contributed to research in topics: Psychoanalytic theory & Psychodynamics. The author has an hindex of 33, co-authored 124 publications receiving 4550 citations. Previous affiliations of Paul L. Wachtel include SUNY Downstate Medical Center & The Graduate Center, CUNY.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a book on psychoanalysis and behavior therapy toward an integration, which is an on-line book provided in this website, where the reader can read more every page of the book.
Abstract: Read more and get great! That's what the book enPDFd psychoanalysis and behavior therapy toward an integration will give for every reader to read this book. This is an on-line book provided in this website. Even this book becomes a choice of someone to read, many in the world also loves it so much. As what we talk, when you read more every page of this psychoanalysis and behavior therapy toward an integration, what you will obtain is something great.

343 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argues that self-concern, so characteristic of our time, has become a search for psychic survival, and that people have retreated from commitments that presuppose a secure and orderly world.
Abstract: Faced with an escalating arms race, rising crime and terrorism, environmental deterioration, and long-term economic decline, people have retreated from commitments that presuppose a secure and orderly world. In his latest book, Christopher Lasch, the renowned historian and social critic, powerfully argues that self-concern, so characteristic of our time, has become a search for psychic survival.

340 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

271 citations

Book
14 Dec 2007
TL;DR: In this paper, one-person and two-person perspectives of personality are explored. Butts et al. describe the "Inner" world, the "Outer" world and the "Lived-in" world: Mobilizing for change in the Patient's daily life.
Abstract: Context and Relationship in Psychotherapy: An Introduction. How Do We Understand Another Person? One-person and Two-person Perspectives. The Dynamics of Personality: One-person and Two-person Views. From Two-person to Contextual: Beyond Infancy and the Consulting Room. Drives, Relationships, and the Foundations of the Relational Point of View. The Limits of the Archaeological Vision: Relational Theory and the Cyclical-contextual Model. Self-states, Dissociation, and the Schemas of Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity. Exploration, Support, Self-acceptance, and the "School of Suspicion". Insight, Direct Experience, and the Implications of a New Understanding of Anxiety. Enactments, New Relational Experience, and Implicit Relational Knowing. Confusions About Self-disclosure: Real Issues, Pseudo-issues, and the Inevitability of Trade-offs. The "Inner" World, the "Outer" World, and the Lived-in World: Mobilizing for Change in the Patient's Daily Life.

221 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The history, evolution, current trends and future prospects of psychotherapy are discussed in this article, with a focus on women and ethnic minority practitioners and material concerning psychotherapy work with both children and the elderly.
Abstract: This text addresses the history, evolution, current trends and future prospects of psychotherapy. Leading authorities in this field discuss psychotherapy's European/Victorian rudiments, provide reviews of frameworks and present reports on the major US psychotherapy research centres. Also included are historic contributions of women and ethnic minority practitioners and material concerning psychotherapeutic work with both children and the elderly.

210 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1973

9,000 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is explored the possibility that romantic love is an attachment process--a biosocial process by which affectional bonds are formed between adult lovers, just as affectional Bonds are formed earlier in life between human infants and their parents.
Abstract: This article explores the possibility that romantic love is an attachment process--a biosocial process by which affectional bonds are formed between adult lovers, just as affectional bonds are formed earlier in life between human infants and their parents. Key components of attachment theory, developed by Bowlby, Ainsworth, and others to explain the development of affectional bonds in infancy, were translated into terms appropriate to adult romantic love. The translation centered on the three major styles of attachment in infancy--secure, avoidant, and anxious/ambivalent--and on the notion that continuity of relationship style is due in part to mental models (Bowlby's "inner working models") of self and social life. These models, and hence a person's attachment style, are seen as determined in part by childhood relationships with parents. Two questionnaire studies indicated that relative prevalence of the three attachment styles is roughly the same in adulthood as in infancy, the three kinds of adults differ predictably in the way they experience romantic love, and attachment style is related in theoretically meaningful ways to mental models of self and social relationships and to relationship experiences with parents. Implications for theories of romantic love are discussed, as are measurement problems and other issues related to future tests of the attachment perspective.

7,767 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors summarized research on self-initiated and professionally facilitated change of addictive behaviors using the key transtheoretical constructs of stages and processes of change.
Abstract: How people intentionally change addictive behaviors with and without treatment is not well understood by behavioral scientists. This article summarizes research on self-initiated and professionally facilitated change of addictive behaviors using the key transtheoretical constructs of stages and processes of change. Modification of addictive behaviors involves progression through five stages—precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance—and individuals typically recycle through these stages several times before termination of the addiction. Multiple studies provide strong support for these stages as well as for a finite and common set of change processes used to progress through the stages. Research to date supports a transtheoretical model of change that systematically integrates the stages with processes of change from diverse theories of psychotherapy.

7,606 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A theoretical model of situation awareness based on its role in dynamic human decision making in a variety of domains is presented and design implications for enhancing operator situation awareness and future directions for situation awareness research are explored.
Abstract: This paper presents a theoretical model of situation awareness based on its role in dynamic human decision making in a variety of domains. Situation awareness is presented as a predominant concern in system operation, based on a descriptive view of decision making. The relationship between situation awareness and numerous individual and environmental factors is explored. Among these factors, attention and working memory are presented as critical factors limiting operators from acquiring and interpreting information from the environment to form situation awareness, and mental models and goal-directed behavior are hypothesized as important mechanisms for overcoming these limits. The impact of design features, workload, stress, system complexity, and automation on operator situation awareness is addressed, and a taxonomy of errors in situation awareness is introduced, based on the model presented. The model is used to generate design implications for enhancing operator situation awareness and future directio...

7,470 citations

Journal Article

5,680 citations