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Paul R. Gray

Bio: Paul R. Gray is an academic researcher from University of California, Berkeley. The author has contributed to research in topics: CMOS & Operational amplifier. The author has an hindex of 57, co-authored 143 publications receiving 18710 citations. Previous affiliations of Paul R. Gray include University of California & Fairchild Semiconductor International, Inc..


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: In this article, the authors combine bipolar, CMOS and BiCMOS analog integrated circuits into a unified treatment that stresses their commonalities and highlights their differences, and provide valuable insights into the relative strengths and weaknesses of these important technologies.
Abstract: The Fifth Edition of this academically rigorous text provides a comprehensive treatment of analog integrated circuit analysis and design starting from the basics and through current industrial practices. The authors combine bipolar, CMOS and BiCMOS analog integrated-circuit design into a unified treatment that stresses their commonalities and highlights their differences. The comprehensive coverage of the material will provide the student with valuable insights into the relative strengths and weaknesses of these important technologies.

4,717 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a 1.5-V, 10-bit, 14.3-MS/s pipeline analog-to-digital converter was implemented in a 0.6/spl mu/m CMOS technology.
Abstract: A 1.5-V, 10-bit, 14.3-MS/s pipeline analog-to-digital converter was implemented in a 0.6 /spl mu/m CMOS technology. Emphasis was placed on observing device reliability constraints at low voltage. MOS switches were implemented without low-threshold devices by using a bootstrapping technique that does not subject the devices to large terminal voltages. The converter achieved a peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio of 58.5 dB, maximum differential nonlinearity of 11.5 least significant bit (LSB), maximum integral nonlinearity of 0.7 LSB, and a power consumption of 36 mW.

966 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This second paper describes a two-capacitor successive approximation technique which, in contrast to the first, requires considerably less die area, is inherently monotonic in the presence of capacitor ratio errors, and which operates at somewhat lower conversion rate.
Abstract: For pt.I see ibid., vol.SC-10, no.6, p.371-9 (1975). Describes techniques for performing A/D conversion compatibly with standard single-channel MOS technology. This second paper describes a two-capacitor successive approximation technique which, in contrast to the first, requires considerably less die area, is inherently monotonic in the presence of capacitor ratio errors, and which operates at somewhat lower conversion rate. Factors affecting accuracy and conversion rate are considered analytically. Experimental results from a monolithic prototype are presented; a resolution of eight bits was achieved with an A/D conversion time of 100 /spl mu/s. Used as a D/A convertor, a settling time of 12.5 /spl mu/s was achieved. The estimated total die size for a completely monolithic version including logic is 5000 mil/SUP 2/.

772 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes a 10 b, 20 Msample/s pipeline A/D converter implemented in 1.2 /spl mu/m CMOS technology which achieves a power dissipation of 35 mW at full speed operation.
Abstract: This paper describes a 10 b, 20 Msample/s pipeline A/D converter implemented in 1.2 /spl mu/m CMOS technology which achieves a power dissipation of 35 mW at full speed operation. Circuit techniques used to achieve this level of power dissipation include digital correction to allow the use of dynamic comparators, and optimum scaling of capacitor values through the pipeline. Also, to be compatible with low voltage mixed-signal system environments, a switched capacitor (SC) circuit in each pipeline stage is implemented and operated at 3.3 V with a new high-speed, low-voltage operational amplifier and charge pump circuits. Measured performance includes 0.6 LSB of INL, 59.1 dB of SNDR (Signal-to-Noise-plus-Distortion-Ratio) for 100 kHz input at 20 Msample/s. At Nyquist sampling (10 MHz input) SNDR is 55.0 dB. Differential input range is /spl plusmn/1 V, and measured input referred RMS noise is 220 /spl mu/V. The power dissipation at 1 MS/s is below 3 mW with 58 dB of SNDR. >

623 citations

Proceedings Article
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a 10 b, 20 µm pipeline A/D converter implemented in 1.2 μm CMOS technology which achieves a power dissipation of 35 mW at full speed operation.
Abstract: ―This paper describes a 10 b, 20 Msample/s pipeline A/D converter implemented in 1.2 μm CMOS technology which achieves a power dissipation of 35 mW at full speed operation. Circuit techniques used to achieve this level of power dissipation include digital correction to allow the use of dynamic comparators, and optimum scaling of capacitor values through the pipeline. Also, to be compatible with low voltage mixed-signal system environments, a switched capacitor (SC) circuit in each pipeline stage is implemented and operated at 3.3 V with a new high-speed, low-voltage operational amplifier and charge pump circuits. Measured performance includes 0.6 LSB of INL, 59.1 dB of SNDR (Signal-to-Noise-plus-Distortion-Ratio) for 100 kHz input at 20 Msample/s. At Nyquist sampling (10 MHz input), SNDR is 55.0 dB. Differential input range is ± 1 V, and measured input referred RMS noise is 220 μV. The power dissipation at 1 MS/s is below 3 mW with 58 dB of SNDR.

577 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The analysis and design techniques of CMOS integrated circuits that practicing engineers need to master to succeed can be found in this article, where the authors describe the thought process behind each circuit topology, but also consider the rationale behind each modification.
Abstract: The CMOS technology area has quickly grown, calling for a new text--and here it is, covering the analysis and design of CMOS integrated circuits that practicing engineers need to master to succeed. Filled with many examples and chapter-ending problems, the book not only describes the thought process behind each circuit topology, but also considers the rationale behind each modification. The analysis and design techniques focus on CMOS circuits but also apply to other IC technologies. Table of contents 1 Introduction to Analog Design 2 Basic MOS Device Physics 3 Single-Stage Amplifiers 4 Differential Amplifiers 5 Passive and Active Current Mirrors 6 Frequency Response of Amplifiers 7 Noise 8 Feedback 9 Operational Amplifiers 10 Stability and Frequency Compensation 11 Bandgap References 12 Introduction to Switched-Capacitor Circuits 13 Nonlinearity and Mismatch 14 Oscillators 15 Phase-Locked Loops 16 Short-Channel Effects and Device Models 17 CMOS Processing Technology 18 Layout and Packaging

4,826 citations

Book
01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: In this article, the authors combine bipolar, CMOS and BiCMOS analog integrated circuits into a unified treatment that stresses their commonalities and highlights their differences, and provide valuable insights into the relative strengths and weaknesses of these important technologies.
Abstract: The Fifth Edition of this academically rigorous text provides a comprehensive treatment of analog integrated circuit analysis and design starting from the basics and through current industrial practices. The authors combine bipolar, CMOS and BiCMOS analog integrated-circuit design into a unified treatment that stresses their commonalities and highlights their differences. The comprehensive coverage of the material will provide the student with valuable insights into the relative strengths and weaknesses of these important technologies.

4,717 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Erdal Arikan1
TL;DR: The paper proves that, given any B-DMC W with I(W) > 0 and any target rate R< I( W) there exists a sequence of polar codes {Cfrn;nges1} such that Cfrn has block-length N=2n, rate ges R, and probability of block error under successive cancellation decoding bounded as Pe(N,R) les O(N-1/4) independently of the code rate.
Abstract: A method is proposed, called channel polarization, to construct code sequences that achieve the symmetric capacity I(W) of any given binary-input discrete memoryless channel (B-DMC) W. The symmetric capacity is the highest rate achievable subject to using the input letters of the channel with equal probability. Channel polarization refers to the fact that it is possible to synthesize, out of N independent copies of a given B-DMC W, a second set of N binary-input channels {WN(i)1 les i les N} such that, as N becomes large, the fraction of indices i for which I(WN(i)) is near 1 approaches I(W) and the fraction for which I(WN(i)) is near 0 approaches 1-I(W). The polarized channels {WN(i)} are well-conditioned for channel coding: one need only send data at rate 1 through those with capacity near 1 and at rate 0 through the remaining. Codes constructed on the basis of this idea are called polar codes. The paper proves that, given any B-DMC W with I(W) > 0 and any target rate R< I(W) there exists a sequence of polar codes {Cfrn;nges1} such that Cfrn has block-length N=2n , rate ges R, and probability of block error under successive cancellation decoding bounded as Pe(N,R) les O(N-1/4) independently of the code rate. This performance is achievable by encoders and decoders with complexity O(N logN) for each.

3,554 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Feb 2014
TL;DR: Measurements and capacity studies are surveyed to assess mmW technology with a focus on small cell deployments in urban environments and it is shown that mmW systems can offer more than an order of magnitude increase in capacity over current state-of-the-art 4G cellular networks at current cell densities.
Abstract: Millimeter-wave (mmW) frequencies between 30 and 300 GHz are a new frontier for cellular communication that offers the promise of orders of magnitude greater bandwidths combined with further gains via beamforming and spatial multiplexing from multielement antenna arrays. This paper surveys measurements and capacity studies to assess this technology with a focus on small cell deployments in urban environments. The conclusions are extremely encouraging; measurements in New York City at 28 and 73 GHz demonstrate that, even in an urban canyon environment, significant non-line-of-sight (NLOS) outdoor, street-level coverage is possible up to approximately 200 m from a potential low-power microcell or picocell base station. In addition, based on statistical channel models from these measurements, it is shown that mmW systems can offer more than an order of magnitude increase in capacity over current state-of-the-art 4G cellular networks at current cell densities. Cellular systems, however, will need to be significantly redesigned to fully achieve these gains. Specifically, the requirement of highly directional and adaptive transmissions, directional isolation between links, and significant possibilities of outage have strong implications on multiple access, channel structure, synchronization, and receiver design. To address these challenges, the paper discusses how various technologies including adaptive beamforming, multihop relaying, heterogeneous network architectures, and carrier aggregation can be leveraged in the mmW context.

2,452 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
R.H. Walden1
TL;DR: The state-of-the-art of ADCs is surveyed, including experimental converters and commercially available parts, and the distribution of resolution versus sampling rate provides insight into ADC performance limitations.
Abstract: Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are ubiquitous, critical components of software radio and other signal processing systems. This paper surveys the state-of-the-art of ADCs, including experimental converters and commercially available parts. The distribution of resolution versus sampling rate provides insight into ADC performance limitations. At sampling rates below 2 million samples per second (Gs/s), resolution appears to be limited by thermal noise. At sampling rates ranging from /spl sim/2 Ms/s to /spl sim/4 giga samples per second (Gs/s), resolution falls off by /spl sim/1 bit for every doubling of the sampling rate. This behavior may be attributed to uncertainty in the sampling instant due to aperture jitter. For ADCs operating at multi-Gs/s rates, the speed of the device technology is also a limiting factor due to comparator ambiguity. Many ADC architectures and integrated circuit technologies have been proposed and implemented to push back these limits. The trend toward single-chip ADCs brings lower power dissipation. However, technological progress as measured by the product of the ADC resolution (bits) times the sampling rate is slow. Average improvement is only /spl sim/1.5 bits for any given sampling frequency over the last six-eight years.

2,220 citations