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Paul V. Boulian

Bio: Paul V. Boulian is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Affective events theory & Job attitude. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5465 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of the variations in organizational commitment and job satisfaction, as related to subsequent turnover in a sample of recently-employed psychiatric technician trainees, was reported.
Abstract: : A study is reported of the variations in organizational commitment and job satisfaction, as related to subsequent turnover in a sample of recently-employed psychiatric technician trainees. A longitudinal study was made across a 10 1/2 month period, with attitude measures collected at four points in time. For this sample, job satisfaction measures appeared better able to differentiate future stayers from leavers in the earliest phase of the study. With the passage of time, organizational commitment measures proved to be a better predictor of turnover, and job satisfaction failed to predict turnover. The findings are discussed in the light of other related studies, and possible explanations are examined. (Modified author abstract)

5,680 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Relationship marketing, established, developing, and maintaining successful relational exchanges, constitutes a major shift in marketing theory and practice as mentioned in this paper, after conceptualizing relationship relationships as a set of relationships.
Abstract: Relationship marketing—establishing, developing, and maintaining successful relational exchanges—constitutes a major shift in marketing theory and practice. After conceptualizing relationship marke...

19,920 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors proposed a three-component model of organizational commitment, which integrates emotional attachment, identification with, and involvement in the organization, and the normative component refers to employees' feelings of obligation to remain with the organization.
Abstract: Organizational commitment has been conceptualized and measured in various ways. The two studies reported here were conducted to test aspects of a three-component model of commitment which integrates these various conceptualizations. The affective component of organizational commitment, proposed by the model, refers to employees' emotional attachment to, identification with, and involvement in, the organization. The continuance component refers to commitment based on the costs that employees associate with leaving the organization. Finally, the normative component refers to employees' feelings of obligation to remain with the organization. In Study 1, scales were developed to measure these components. Relationships among the components of commitment and with variables considered their antecedents were examined in Study 2. Results of a canonical correlation analysis suggested that, as predicted by the model, the affective and continuance components of organizational commitment are empirically distinguishable constructs with different correlates. The affective and normative components, although distinguishable, appear to be somewhat related. The importance of differentiating the components of commitment, both in research and practice, is discussed.

10,654 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors go beyond the existing distinction between attitudinal and behavioral commitment and argue that commitment, as a psychological state, has at least three separable components reflecting a desire (affective commitment), a need (continuance commitment), and an obligation (normative commitment) to maintain employment in an organization.

9,212 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) as discussed by the authors ) is a measure of employee commitment to work organizations, developed by Porter and his colleagues, which is based on a series of studies among 2563 employees in nine divergent organizations.

8,144 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that people can use varying degrees of their selves, physically, cognitively, and emotionally, in work role performances, which has implications for both their performance and their wellbeing.
Abstract: This study began with the premise that people can use varying degrees of their selves, physically, cognitively, and emotionally, in work role performances, which has implications for both their wor...

7,647 citations