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Pesus Chou

Bio: Pesus Chou is an academic researcher from National Yang-Ming University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Population & Hazard ratio. The author has an hindex of 65, co-authored 481 publications receiving 16907 citations. Previous affiliations of Pesus Chou include Taipei Veterans General Hospital.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investigation of stress reactions among 338 staff members in a hospital in East Taiwan that discontinued emergency and outpatient services to prevent possible nosocomial outbreak found that quarantine was the most related factor.
Abstract: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was unique because it was highly concentrated in health care settings and a large number of health care workers were infected. This study investigated stress reactions among 338 staff members in a hospital in East Taiwan that discontinued emergency and outpatient services to prevent possible nosocomial outbreak. Seventeen staff members (5 percent) suffered from an acute stress disorder; stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis determined that quarantine was the most related factor. Sixty-six staff members (20 percent) felt stigmatized and rejected in their neighborhood because of their hospital work, and 20 of 218 health care workers (9 percent) reported reluctance to work or had considered resignation.

805 citations

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TL;DR: The prevalence of dry eye, although varied according to definition, is relatively higher in this study than that reported for whites, and further studies are needed to determine whether this is due to racial or environmental factors.

562 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that middle-aged women and men have a more dominant parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation of heart rate, respectively, whereas a significant time delay for the disappearance of sympathetic dominance occurs in men.
Abstract: To clarify the influence of gender on sympathetic and parasympathetic control of heart rate in middle-aged subjects and on the subsequent aging process, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in normal populations of women (n = 598) and men (n = 472) ranging in age from 40 to 79 yr. These groups were divided into eight age strata at 5-yr intervals and were clinically diagnosed as having no hypertension, hypotension, diabetic neuropathy, or cardiac arrhythmia. Frequency-domain analysis of short-term, stationary R-R intervals was performed, which reveals very-low-frequency power (VLF; 0.003-0.04 Hz), low-frequency power (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz), high-frequency power (HF; 0.15-0.40 Hz), the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF), and LF and HF power in normalized units (LF% and HF%, respectively). The distribution of variance, VLF, LF, HF, and LF/HF exhibited acute skewness, which was adjusted by natural logarithmic transformation. Women had higher HF in the age strata from 40 to 49 yr, whereas men had higher LF% and LF/HF between 40 and 59 yr. No disparity in HRV measurements was found between the sexes in age strata >/=60 yr. Although absolute measurements of HRV (variance, VLF, LF, and HF) decreased linearly with age, no significant change in relative measurements (LF/HF, LF%, and HF%), especially in men, was detected until age 60 yr. We conclude that middle-aged women and men have a more dominant parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation of heart rate, respectively. The gender-related difference in parasympathetic regulation diminishes after age 50 yr, whereas a significant time delay for the disappearance of sympathetic dominance occurs in men.

541 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Systolic and pulse pressures relate differently to different target organs and central systolic pressure is more valuable than other blood pressure variables in predicting cardiovascular mortality.
Abstract: ObjectiveTo examine the relationship between brachial and central carotid pressures and target organ indices at baseline and their association with future mortality.MethodsWe examined, cross-sectionally and longitudinally, the relations of baseline systolic and pulse pressures in central (calibrated

411 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Pb, a transit time–independent measure of reflected wave magnitude, predicted long-term cardiovascular mortality in men and women independent of arterial stiffness.
Abstract: The value of increased arterial wave reflection, usually assessed by the transit time-dependent augmentation index and augmented pressure (Pa), in the prediction of cardiovascular events may have been underestimated. We investigated whether the transit time-independent measures of reflected wave magnitude predict cardiovascular outcomes independent of arterial stiffness indexed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. A total of 1272 participants (47% women; mean age: 52+/-13 years; range: 30 to 79 years) from a community-based survey were studied. Carotid pressure waveforms derived by tonometry were decomposed into their forward wave amplitudes, backward wave amplitudes (Pb), and a reflection index (=[Pb/(forward wave amplitude+Pb)]), in addition to augmentation index, Pa, and reflected wave transit time. During a median follow-up of 15 years, 225 deaths occurred (17.6%), including 64 cardiovascular origins (5%). In univariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, pulse wave velocity, Pa, and Pb predicted all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both men and women, whereas augmentation index, reflected wave transit time, and reflection index were predictive only in men. In multivariate analysis accounting for age, height, and heart rate, Pb predicted cardiovascular mortality in both men and women, whereas Pa was predictive only in men. Per 1-SD increment (6 mm Hg), Pb predicted 15-year cardiovascular mortality independent of brachial but not central pressure, pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, Pa, and conventional cardiovascular risk factors with hazard ratios of approximately 1.60 (all P<0.05). In conclusion, Pb, a transit time-independent measure of reflected wave magnitude, predicted long-term cardiovascular mortality in men and women independent of arterial stiffness.

343 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the psychological impact of quarantine using three electronic databases is presented in this article, where the authors report negative psychological effects including post-traumatic stress symptoms, confusion, and anger.

10,370 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In the early 1990s, the National Kidney Foundation (K/DOQI) developed a set of clinical practice guidelines to define chronic kidney disease and to classify stages in the progression of kidney disease.

10,265 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine welcomes Anthony Fauci to its editorial staff, in addition to more than 85 new contributors.
Abstract: The 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine welcomes Anthony Fauci to its editorial staff, in addition to more than 85 new contributors. While the organization of the book is similar to previous editions, major emphasis has been placed on disorders that affect multiple organ systems. Important advances in genetics, immunology, and oncology are emphasized. Many chapters of the book have been rewritten and describe major advances in internal medicine. Subjects that received only a paragraph or two of attention in previous editions are now covered in entire chapters. Among the chapters that have been extensively revised are the chapters on infections in the compromised host, on skin rashes in infections, on many of the viral infections, including cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, on sexually transmitted diseases, on diabetes mellitus, on disorders of bone and mineral metabolism, and on lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The major revisions in these chapters and many

6,968 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These predictions, based on a larger number of studies than previous estimates, indicate a growing burden of diabetes, particularly in developing countries.

6,868 citations