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Peter J. McCann

Bio: Peter J. McCann is an academic researcher from Alcatel-Lucent. The author has contributed to research in topics: Mobile computing & Wireless network. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 34 publications receiving 941 citations. Previous affiliations of Peter J. McCann include Bell Labs & University of Washington.

Papers
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Patent
02 Jul 1998
TL;DR: In this article, a non-local dynamic IP address is assigned to a communication device to satisfy the address request to the local network, and a tunnel set up request is transmitted from the local router to the remote router of the remote network to establish and OSI layer 3 tunnel to enable communications between the communication device and the IP network.
Abstract: A communication system having a local network communicating with a remote network for assigning a dynamic Internet Protocol address to a communication device to enable a communication session between the communication device and an IP network The communication device sends an address request to the local network. If the local network does not selectively assign a local dynamic IP address, the address request is transmitted to a remote network to determine whether a non-local dynamic IP address from a remote pool of non-local dynamic IP addresses is able to be assigned. The communication system selectively communicates with other remote networks until a non-local dynamic IP address can be assigned to satisfy the address request. Once a non-local dynamic IP address has been assigned, the non-local dynamic IP address will be maintained for the duration of the communication session between the communication device and the IP network. If the remote pool of non-local dynamic IP addresses is able to assign a non-local dynamic IP address, then a tunnel set up request is transmitted from the local router of the local network to the remote router of the remote network to establish and OSI layer 3 tunnel to enable communications between the communication device and the IP network.

132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article considers the nature of the underlying formal models that will enable us to specify and reason about mobile computations, and employs the methods of UNITY, a highly modular extension of the UNITY programming notation.
Abstract: Mobile computing represents a major point of departure from the traditional distributed-computing paradigm. The potentially very large number of independent computing units, a decoupled computing style, frequent disconnections, continuous position changes, and the location-dependent nature of the behavior and communication patterns present designers with unprecedented challenges in the areas of modularity and dependability. So far, the literature on mobile computing is dominated by concerns having to de with the development of protocols and services. This article complements this perspective by considering the nature of the underlying formal models that will enable us to specify and reason about such computations. The basic research goal is to characterize fundamental issues facing mobile computing. We want to achieve this in a manner analogous to the way concepts such as shared variables and message passing help us understand distributed computing. The pragmatic objective is to develop techniques that facilitate the verification and design of dependable mobile systems. Toward this goal we employ the methods of UNITY. To focus on what is essential, we center our study on ad hoc networks, whose singular nature is bound to reveal the ultimate impact of movement on the way one computes and communicates in a mobile environment. To understand interactions we start with the UNITY concepts of union and superposition and consider direct generalizations to transient interactions. The motivation behind the transient nature of the interactions comes from the fact that components can communicate with each other only when they are within a a certain range. The notation we employ is a highly modular extension of the UNITY programming notation. Reasoning about mobile computations relies on extensions to the UNITY proof logic.

123 citations

01 Aug 2005
TL;DR: This document specifies a Diameter application that allows a D diameter server to authenticate, authorize and collect accounting information for Mobile IPv4 services rendered to a mobile node.
Abstract: This document specifies a Diameter application that allows a Diameter server to authenticate, authorize and collect accounting information for Mobile IPv4 services rendered to a mobile node. Combined with the Inter-Realm capability of the base protocol, this application allows mobile nodes to receive service from foreign service providers. Diameter Accounting messages will be used by the Foreign and Home agents to transfer usage information to the Diameter servers.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Aug 2000
TL;DR: In writing networking code, one is often faced with the task of interpreting a raw buffer according to a standardized packet format, for example, when monitoring network traffic for specific kinds of packets, or when unmarshaling an incoming packet for protocol processing.
Abstract: In writing networking code, one is often faced with the task of interpreting a raw buffer according to a standardized packet format. This is needed, for example, when monitoring network traffic for specific kinds of packets, or when unmarshaling an incoming packet for protocol processing. In such cases, a programmer typically writes C code that understands the grammar of a packet and that also performs any necessary byte-order and alignment adjustments. Because of the complexity of certain protocol formats, and because of the low-level of programming involved, writing such code is usually a cumbersome and error-prone process. Furthermore, code written in this style loses the domain-specific information, viz. the packet format, in its details, making it difficult to maintain.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper addresses the question of whether UNITY, a state-based formalism with a foundation in temporal logic, can be extended to address concurrent, mobile systems and examines some new abstractions for communication among mobile components that express reconfiguration and disconnection and which can be composed in a modular fashion.
Abstract: Recent advances in wireless networking technology and the increasing demand for ubiquitous, mobile connectivity demonstrate the importance of providing reliable systems for managing the reconfiguration and disconnection of components. The design of such systems requires tools and techniques appropriate to the task. Many formal models of computation, including UNITY, are not adequate for expressing reconfiguration and disconnection and are, therefore, inappropriate vehicles for investigating the impact of mobility on the construction of modular and composable systems. Algebraic formalisms such as the /spl pi/-calculus have been proposed for modeling mobility. This paper addresses the question of whether UNITY, a state-based formalism with a foundation in temporal logic, can be extended to address concurrent, mobile systems. In the process, we examine some new abstractions for communication among mobile components that express reconfiguration and disconnection and which can be composed in a modular fashion.

89 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jul 2014
TL;DR: This paper proposes P4 as a strawman proposal for how OpenFlow should evolve in the future, and describes how to use P4 to configure a switch to add a new hierarchical label.
Abstract: P4 is a high-level language for programming protocol-independent packet processors. P4 works in conjunction with SDN control protocols like OpenFlow. In its current form, OpenFlow explicitly specifies protocol headers on which it operates. This set has grown from 12 to 41 fields in a few years, increasing the complexity of the specification while still not providing the flexibility to add new headers. In this paper we propose P4 as a strawman proposal for how OpenFlow should evolve in the future. We have three goals: (1) Reconfigurability in the field: Programmers should be able to change the way switches process packets once they are deployed. (2) Protocol independence: Switches should not be tied to any specific network protocols. (3) Target independence: Programmers should be able to describe packet-processing functionality independently of the specifics of the underlying hardware. As an example, we describe how to use P4 to configure a switch to add a new hierarchical label.

2,214 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A conceptual framework for understanding code mobility is presented, centered around a classification that introduces three dimensions: technologies, design paradigms, and applications that support the developer in the identification of the classes of applications that can leverage off of mobile code, in the design of these applications, and in the selection of the most appropriate implementation technologies.
Abstract: The technologies, architectures, and methodologies traditionally used to develop distributed applications exhibit a variety of limitations and drawbacks when applied to large scale distributed settings (e.g., the Internet). In particular, they fail in providing the desired degree of configurability, scalability, and customizability. To address these issues, researchers are investigating a variety of innovative approaches. The most promising and intriguing ones are those based on the ability of moving code across the nodes of a network, exploiting the notion of mobile code. As an emerging research field, code mobility is generating a growing body of scientific literature and industrial developments. Nevertheless, the field is still characterized by the lack of a sound and comprehensive body of concepts and terms. As a consequence, it is rather difficult to understand, assess, and compare the existing approaches. In turn, this limits our ability to fully exploit them in practice, and to further promote the research work on mobile code. Indeed, a significant symptom of this situation is the lack of a commonly accepted and sound definition of the term mobile code itself. This paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding code mobility. The framework is centered around a classification that introduces three dimensions: technologies, design paradigms, and applications. The contribution of the paper is two-fold. First, it provides a set of terms and concepts to understand and compare the approaches based on the notion of mobile code. Second, it introduces criteria and guidelines that support the developer in the identification of the classes of applications that can leverage off of mobile code, in the design of these applications, and, finally, in the selection of the most appropriate implementation technologies. The presentation of the classification is intertwined with a review of state-of-the-art in the field. Finally, the use of the classification is exemplified in a case study.

1,219 citations

Patent
27 May 2005
TL;DR: In this article, a Mobility Management Server coupled to the mobile network maintains the state of any number of mobile end systems and handles the complex session management required to maintain persistent connections to the network and to other peer processes.
Abstract: A seamless solution transparently addresses the characteristics of nomadic systems, and enables existing network applications to run reliably in mobile environments. The solution extends the enterprise network, letting network managers provide mobile users with easy access to the same applications as stationary users without sacrificing reliability or centralized management. The solution combines advantages of existing wire-line network standards with emerging mobile standards to create a solution that works with existing network applications. A Mobility Management Server coupled to the mobile network maintains the state of each of any number of Mobile End Systems and handles the complex session management required to maintain persistent connections to the network and to other peer processes. If a Mobile End System becomes unreachable, suspends, or changes network address (e.g., due to roaming from one network interconnect to another), the Mobility Management Server maintains the connection to the associated peer task—allowing the Mobile End System to maintain a continuous connection even though it may temporarily lose contact with its network medium. In one example, Mobility Management Server communicates with Mobile End Systems using Remote Procedure Call and Internet Mobility Protocols.

1,040 citations

Patent
16 Sep 1998
TL;DR: In this paper, an apparatus and method is provided for transparent communication between a remote or mobile device and a fixed communication host network. But it is not clear how to determine whether the remote devices are indistinguishable to the host network from the locally attached devices.
Abstract: An apparatus and method is provided for transparent communication between a remote or mobile device and a fixed communication host network. The apparatus and method may include a remote network controller that logically resides between the host network and the existing infrastructure(s) that are used to provide communications network contact with one or more remote devices. The remote network controller is connected to the host communication network as a protocol-appropriate communications controller so that remote devices are indistinguishable to the host network from the locally-attached devices. Each remote device may be provided with an asynchronous serial data interface to communicate with a mobile data controller. The mobile data controller, in combination with the remote network controller, provides end-to-end data communication such that incompatible protocols are transparent to the remote device and host communication network. A router may be provided which selects a communications network in accordance with user configured parameters. The router communicates over a plurality of incompatible networks and is capable of using a variety of different protocols. Switching between the plurality of incompatible networks is transparent to the remote device and host communication network.

519 citations

Patent
18 Nov 2005
TL;DR: In this article, an apparatus is disclosed for permitting a mobile terminal having multiple, heterogeneous network connections (e.g., multiple wired or wireless transceivers of various types) to set up and maintain virtual connections over multiple networks to either the same or to multiple destinations.
Abstract: An apparatus is disclosed for permitting a mobile terminal having multiple, heterogeneous network connections (e.g., multiple wired or wireless transceivers of various types) to set up and maintain virtual connections over multiple networks to either the same or to multiple destinations. The mobile terminal can “load-share” traffic, i.e., it can distribute segments of traffic over a full set of heterogeneous networks, significantly improving the reliability and availability of communications. In a first embodiment, a mobile terminal is configured with multiple radio frequency (RF) transceivers. Operating system software is provided for dynamically establishing and maintaining traffic flow for user applications over multiple communications paths, and for automatically adapting to variations in the networking environment, application traffic flow requirements, end user preferences, or mobility. In a second embodiment, a software-defined radio is used to implement the physical layer protocols for each desired network, eliminating the need for multiple transceivers.

516 citations