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Peter K. Liaw

Bio: Peter K. Liaw is an academic researcher from University of Tennessee. The author has contributed to research in topics: High entropy alloys & Alloy. The author has an hindex of 84, co-authored 1068 publications receiving 37916 citations. Previous affiliations of Peter K. Liaw include Westinghouse Electric & National Taiwan Ocean University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The concept of high entropy introduces a new path of developing advanced materials with unique properties, which cannot be achieved by the conventional micro-alloying approach based on only one dominant element as mentioned in this paper.

4,394 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the factors of the atomic size difference Delta and the enthalpy of mixing ΔH mιx of the multi-component alloys were summarized from the literatures.
Abstract: The factors of the atomic size difference Delta and the enthalpy of mixing ΔH mιx of the multi-component alloys were summarized from the literatures. The formation zones of solid-solution phases, intermediate phases, and bulk metallic glasses were determined and the validity was verified by experimental results. For forming the solid solution, the alloys should have high entropy of mixing, lower Delta, and not too negative and positive enthalpy of mixing.

1,936 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, two refractory high-entropy alloys with nearequiatomic concentrations, WNB-Mo-Ta and WBMCV, were produced by vacuum arc melting and the lattice parameters were determined with high-energy X-ray diffraction using a scattering vector length range from 0.7 to 20A−1.

1,655 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an Al 0.5 CoCrCuFeNi high entropy alloy (HEA) was used to study the fatigue behavior of the Alloy and a Weibull mixture predictive model was applied to predict the fatigue data and characterize the variability seen in the HEAs.

616 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the recent development of high-entropy alloys and summarize their preparation methods, composition design, phase formation and microstructures, various properties, and modeling and simulation calculations.
Abstract: As human improve their ability to fabricate materials, alloys have evolved from simple to complex compositions, accordingly improving functions and performances, promoting the advancements of human civilization. In recent years, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have attracted tremendous attention in various fields. With multiple principal components, they inherently possess unique microstructures and many impressive properties, such as high strength and hardness, excellent corrosion resistance, thermal stability, fatigue, fracture, and irradiation resistance, in terms of which they overwhelm the traditional alloys. All these properties have endowed HEAs with many promising potential applications. An in-depth understanding of the essence of HEAs is important to further developing numerous HEAs with better properties and performance in the future. In this paper, we review the recent development of HEAs, and summarize their preparation methods, composition design, phase formation and microstructures, various properties, and modeling and simulation calculations. In addition, the future trends and prospects of HEAs are put forward.

594 citations


Cited by
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08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

01 May 1993
TL;DR: Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems.
Abstract: Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a fixed subset of atoms; the second assigns each a fixed subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently—those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 100,000,000 atoms on several parallel supercomputers--the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon, and Cray T3D. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and a 1840-node Intel Paragon performs up to 165 faster than a single Cray C9O processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

29,323 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: High entropy alloys (HEAs) are barely 12 years old as discussed by the authors, and the field has stimulated new ideas and inspired the exploration of the vast composition space offered by multi-principal element alloys.

4,693 citations