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Peter L. Shillingsburg

Bio: Peter L. Shillingsburg is an academic researcher from De Montfort University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Textuality & Literary criticism. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 14 publications receiving 380 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This new edition of "Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age" introduces the basic vocabulary of textual criticism, demonstrates how literary criticism suffers from ignorance of textual processes, and offers practical advice on the preparation, presentation, and uses of scholarly editions.

114 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: Scholarly editing in the computer age as discussed by the authors is an excellent survey of the field of text editing in a computer-aided learning setting, with a focus on the relationship between textual criticism and literary criticism.
Abstract: Most readers, including professional literary academics, spend little time wondering about the state of the texts they are using. Yet the nature and status of texts, and the method of their editing, have profound effects on the ways they can be read. "Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age" introduces the basic vocabulary of textual criticism, demonstrates how literary criticism suffers from ignorance of textual processes, and offers practical advice on the preparation, presentation, and uses of scholarly editions.Over the last decade, a major shift in the goals of scholarly editing has occurred, and the field has moved to acknowledge multiple texts and process as the editorial goal. Developments in electronic text presentation have released editors from the limitations and presuppositions about text imposed by the nature of printed books. And developments in literary criticism, including "new historicism," intertextuality, and contextualism, have put demands on editors to produce editions adequate for the new questions being asked of texts. This third edition of "Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age" has been thoroughly revised and updated to address current debates and controversies in the field.The volume is divided into three parts. Part 1, Theory, explores eight crucial concepts that affect the planning and execution of scholarly editions. Part 2, Practice, focuses on how the different views of editorial concerns influence selections of copy-text (or base text), how they influence an editor's emendation policy, and how they affect the arrangement and scope of textual apparatus. Part 3, Practicalities, explores the practical problems facing all scholarly editors, regardless of the theories they follow, and outlines ways in which computer technology has changed production processes and presentation options for scholarly editions.In earlier editions, "Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age" has been repeatedly praised for the clarity with which it presents the range of editorial problems and the varieties of approaches to their solution. This new edition will prove an essential resource for students of scholarly editing and for anyone interested in the close relationship between textual criticism and literary criticism.Peter L. Shillingsburg is Professor of English, University of North Texas

84 citations

Book
31 Aug 2006
TL;DR: In this article, Shillingsburg considers the potentials and pitfalls, enhancements and distortions, achievements and inadequacies of electronic editions of literary texts, and considers the loss of the book as a material object and the negative consequences of technology.
Abstract: As technologies for electronic texts develop into ever more sophisticated engines for capturing different kinds of information, radical changes are underway in the way we write, transmit and read texts. In this thought-provoking work, Peter Shillingsburg considers the potentials and pitfalls, the enhancements and distortions, the achievements and inadequacies of electronic editions of literary texts. In tracing historical changes in the processes of composition, revision, production, distribution and reception, Shillingsburg reveals what is involved in the task of transferring texts from print to electronic media. He explores the potentials, some yet untapped, for electronic representations of printed works in ways that will make the electronic representation both more accurate and more rich than was ever possible with printed forms. However, he also keeps in mind the possible loss of the book as a material object and the negative consequences of technology.

63 citations

Book
08 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Shillingsburg argues that as humans we are and always will be interested in the past, in what was meant, and what was revealed inadvertently by a text as discussed by the authors. But we learn more and can compare notes better when we understand the principles that govern the ways we read.
Abstract: "It is with no desire or hope to promote a correct or superior form of textuality, with no desire to correct a so-called interpretive or editorial textual abuse, nor any attempt to prevent anyone from doing anything imaginable with texts or books that I have undertaken this book. . . ." So writes Peter Shillingsburg in his introduction to this series of meditations on the possibilities of deriving "meaning" from the texts we read.Shillingsburg argues that as humans we are and always will be interested in the past, in what was meant, in what was revealed inadvertently by a text--and that is all to the good. But we learn more and can compare notes better when we understand the principles that govern the ways we read. "Resisting Texts" approaches crucial questions about the practice of textual editing and literary criticism by posing questions in the form "If we take such and such to be the goal of our reading, then what will follow from that assumption?"With humor and a lively imagination, Shillingsburg takes the reader on a fresh theoretical investigation of communication, understanding and misunderstanding, and textual satisfactions, drawing examples from Thackeray, Wordsworth, Melville, and others."Resisting Texts" will appeal to all who enjoy the varieties of critical approaches to the written word.Peter L. Shillingsburg is Professor of English, University of North Texas.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Shillingsburg as discussed by the authors revisited W.M. Thackeray's writing within the context of the Victorian marketplace and found that the social and contractual forces that both enabled and limited the writing and publishing of books influenced but did not control the artist.
Abstract: In this fresh look at the relationship between an author and his publishers, Peter L. Shillingsburg reassesses W.M. Thackeray's writing within the context of the Victorian marketplace. He explores the forces under which Thackeray wrote, and addresses the broader question of the extent to which authors are free to invent their books given the influences of theoretical trends and the publishing marketplace. Rejecting both the Romantic notion of the autonomous genius and the Marxist concept of social and economic determinism, Shillingsburg presents a concept of the artist as being, simultaneously, bound and free, a ""Pegasus in harness"". In addition to being an intense examination of the contractual relations between Thackeray and several publishers, Pegasus in Harness presents a compendium of information about Victorian book production, publishing and bookselling. Shillingsburg's analysis of book production is an example of original research that goes far beyond anything currently available. His documentation includes extensive quotations from 350 unpublished letters between Thackeray and his publishers and copies of all the surviving contracts for Thackeray's books. Contrary to popular opinion about Thackeray, Shillingsburg portrays him as a thoroughly professional writer. He traces Thackeray's economic progression and unfolds the development of Thackeray's notion of authorship as a dignified trade in which compromises were constantly being struck between the aspirations of the author and the realities of the marketplace. In this assessment, the social and contractual forces that both enabled and limited the writing and publishing of books influenced but did not control the artist. A synthesis of theory, history, biography and sociology, this book looks at the way in which literary texts are created, published and marketed, and explores how they can be shaped by the cultural conditions surrounding their creation.

32 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article reconceptualized materiality as the interplay between a text's physical characteris- tics and its signifying strategies, a move that entwines instantiation and signification at the outset.
Abstract: Lulled into somnolence by five hundred years of print, literary analysis should awaken to the importance of media-specific analysis, a mode of critical atten- tion which recognizes that all texts are instantiated and that the nature of the medium in which they are instantiated matters. Central to repositioning critical inquiry, so it can attend to the specificity of the medium, is a more robust notion of materiality. Materiality is reconceptualized as the interplay between a text's physical characteris- tics and its signifying strategies, a move that entwines instantiation and signification at the outset. This definition opens the possibility of considering texts as embodied entities while still maintaining a central focus on interpretation. It makes materiality an emergent property, so that it cannot be specified in advance, as if it were a pre- given entity. Rather, materiality is open to debate and interpretation, ensuring that discussions about the text's ''meaning'' will also take into account its physical speci- ficity as well.

287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the relationship between punctuation units and speech and found that punctuation reflects covert prosody of written language, and the variations in this relation that are found among different authors and different styles.
Abstract: Introspection suggests that both writers and readers experience auditory imagery of intonation, accents, and hesitations. The suggestion here is that certain important aspects of this “covert prosody” of written language are reflected in punctuation. In order to study systematically the degree to which punctuation reflects the covert prosody of written language, one would like to find independent ways of uncovering that prosody. Two such ways are explored here: reading aloud and “repunctuating” (inserting punctuation in passages from which the author's punctuation has been removed). The article focuses especially on the relation between “punctuation units” (stretches of language between punctuation marks) and the “intonation units” of speech, and the variations in this relation that are found among different authors and different styles. It explores the degree to which different pieces of writing are prosodically spokenlike, and the degree to which they capture the prosodic imagery of ordinary readers. “C...

154 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that both work and text should be considered embodied and media-specific, and that "work" should be thought of as an Assemblage rather than a convergent ideal construct.
Abstract: Literary criticism is filled with assumptions specific to print. As print materials are increasingly translated into electronic documents, these unrecognized assumptions tend to be overlaid onto electronic materials without thinking through how textuality must change when texts are electronic. Arguing that an electronic text should properly be considered a process rather than an object, this essay revisits definitions of work, text, and document. Two central premises need to be rethought: that work and text are disembodied, and that "work" is a convergent ideal construct. The essay proposes instead that both work and text be considered embodied and media-specific, and that "work" be thought of as an Assemblage rather than a convergent ideal.

107 citations

Book
30 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, dramatic performativity and the force of performance are discussed in the context of Cyber-Performing and Cyber-performance, and the authors propose a model for performing history and Shakespearean geographies.
Abstract: Introduction: dramatic performativity and the force of performance 1. Performing history 2. Globe performativity 3. Shakespearean geographies 4. Cyber-performance.

106 citations

Book
28 Jul 2015
TL;DR: This book provides an up-to-date, coherent and comprehensive treatment of digital scholarly editing, organized according to the typical timeline and workflow of the preparation of an edition: from the choice of the object to edit, the editorial work, post-production and publication, the use of the published edition, to long-term issues and the ultimate significance of thepublished work.
Abstract: This book provides an up-to-date, coherent and comprehensive treatment of digital scholarly editing, organized according to the typical timeline and workflow of the preparation of an edition: from the choice of the object to edit, the editorial work, post-production and publication, the use of the published edition, to long-term issues and the ultimate significance of the published work The author also examines from a theoretical and methodological point of view the issues and problems that emerge during these stages with the application of computational techniques and methods Building on previous publications on the topic, the book discusses the most significant developments in digital textual scholarship, claiming that the alterations in traditional editorial practices necessitated by the use of computers impose radical changes in the way we think and manage texts, documents, editions and the public It is of interest not only to scholarly editors, but to all involved in publishing and readership in a digital environment in the humanities

96 citations