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Peter Politzer

Bio: Peter Politzer is an academic researcher from University of New Orleans. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ab initio & Molecule. The author has an hindex of 90, co-authored 460 publications receiving 33894 citations. Previous affiliations of Peter Politzer include Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic & Cleveland State University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors carried out a natural bond order B3LYP analysis of the molecules CF(3)X, with X = F, Cl, Br and I. The results showed that the Cl and Br atoms in these molecules closely approximate the [Formula: see text] configuration, where the z-axis is along the R-X bond.
Abstract: Halogen bonding refers to the non-covalent interactions of halogen atoms X in some molecules, RX, with negative sites on others. It can be explained by the presence of a region of positive electrostatic potential, the sigma-hole, on the outermost portion of the halogen's surface, centered on the R-X axis. We have carried out a natural bond order B3LYP analysis of the molecules CF(3)X, with X = F, Cl, Br and I. It shows that the Cl, Br and I atoms in these molecules closely approximate the [Formula: see text] configuration, where the z-axis is along the R-X bond. The three unshared pairs of electrons produce a belt of negative electrostatic potential around the central part of X, leaving the outermost region positive, the sigma-hole. This is not found in the case of fluorine, for which the combination of its high electronegativity plus significant sp-hybridization causes an influx of electronic charge that neutralizes the sigma-hole. These factors become progressively less important in proceeding to Cl, Br and I, and their effects are also counteracted by the presence of electron-withdrawing substituents in the remainder of the molecule. Thus a sigma-hole is observed for the Cl in CF(3)Cl, but not in CH(3)Cl.

1,893 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a definition for the term ''halogen bond'' is proposed, which designates a specific subset of the inter-and intramolecular interactions involving a halogen atom in a molecular entity.
Abstract: This recommendation proposes a definition for the term ``halogen bond'', which designates a specific subset of the inter- and intramolecular interactions involving a halogen atom in a molecular entity.

1,386 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Experimental as well as computational studies indicate that halogen and other sigma-hole interactions can be competitive with hydrogen bonding, which itself can be viewed as a subset of s Sigma-hole bonding.
Abstract: A halogen bond is a highly directional, electrostatically-driven noncovalent interaction between a region of positive electrostatic potential on the outer side of the halogen X in a molecule R–X and a negative site B, such as a lone pair of a Lewis base or the π-electrons of an unsaturated system. The positive region on X corresponds to the electronically-depleted outer lobe of the half-filled p-type orbital of X that is involved in forming the covalent bond to R. This depletion is labeled a σ-hole. The resulting positive electrostatic potential is along the extension of the R–X bond, which accounts for the directionality of halogen bonding. Positive σ-holes can also be found on covalently-bonded Group IV–VI atoms, which can similarly interact electrostatically with negative sites. Since positive σ-holes often exist in conjunction with negative potentials on other portions of the atom's surface, such atoms can interact electrostatically with both nucleophiles and electrophiles, as has been observed in surveys of crystallographic structures. Experimental as well as computational studies indicate that halogen and other σ-hole interactions can be competitive with hydrogen bonding, which itself can be viewed as a subset of σ-hole bonding.

1,332 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A σ-hole bond is a noncovalent interaction between a covalently-bonded atom of Groups IV-VII and a negative site, e.g. a lone pair of a Lewis base or an anion.
Abstract: A σ-hole bond is a noncovalent interaction between a covalently-bonded atom of Groups IV–VII and a negative site, e.g. a lone pair of a Lewis base or an anion. It involves a region of positive electrostatic potential, labeled a σ-hole, on the extension of one of the covalent bonds to the atom. The σ-hole is due to the anisotropy of the atom's charge distribution. Halogen bonding is a subset of σ-hole interactions. Their features and properties can be fully explained in terms of electrostatics and polarization plus dispersion. The strengths of the interactions generally correlate well with the magnitudes of the positive and negative electrostatic potentials of the σ-hole and the negative site. In certain instances, however, polarizabilities must be taken into account explicitly, as the polarization of the negative site reaches a level that can be viewed as a degree of dative sharing (coordinate covalence). In the gas phase, σ-hole interactions with neutral bases are often thermodynamically unfavorable due to the relatively large entropy loss upon complex formation.

1,294 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Five practical examples involving a wide variety of systems and analysis methods are given to illustrate the usefulness of Multiwfn, a multifunctional program for wavefunction analysis.
Abstract: Multiwfn is a multifunctional program for wavefunction analysis. Its main functions are: (1) Calculating and visualizing real space function, such as electrostatic potential and electron localization function at point, in a line, in a plane or in a spatial scope. (2) Population analysis. (3) Bond order analysis. (4) Orbital composition analysis. (5) Plot density-of-states and spectrum. (6) Topology analysis for electron density. Some other useful utilities involved in quantum chemistry studies are also provided. The built-in graph module enables the results of wavefunction analysis to be plotted directly or exported to high-quality graphic file. The program interface is very user-friendly and suitable for both research and teaching purpose. The code of Multiwfn is substantially optimized and parallelized. Its efficiency is demonstrated to be significantly higher than related programs with the same functions. Five practical examples involving a wide variety of systems and analysis methods are given to illustrate the usefulness of Multiwfn. The program is free of charge and open-source. Its precompiled file and source codes are available from http://multiwfn.codeplex.com.

17,273 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Experimental and computational approaches to estimate solubility and permeability in discovery and development settings are described in this article, where the rule of 5 is used to predict poor absorption or permeability when there are more than 5 H-bond donors, 10 Hbond acceptors, and the calculated Log P (CLogP) is greater than 5 (or MlogP > 415).

14,026 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of current studies in density functional theory and density matrix functional theory is presented, with special attention to the possible applications within chemistry, including the concept of an atom in a molecule, calculation of electronegativities from the Xα method, pressure, Gibbs-Duhem equation, Maxwell relations and stability conditions.
Abstract: Current studies in density functional theory and density matrix functional theory are reviewed, with special attention to the possible applications within chemistry. Topics discussed include the concept of electronegativity, the concept of an atom in a molecule, calculation of electronegativities from the Xα method, the concept of pressure, Gibbs-Duhem equation, Maxwell relations, stability conditions, and local density functional theory.

14,008 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The SMD model may be employed with other algorithms for solving the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for continuum solvation calculations in which the solute is represented by its electron density in real space, including, for example, the conductor-like screening algorithm.
Abstract: We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the “D” stands for “density” to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. “Continuum” denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute−solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where “universal” denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonho...

10,945 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the DMol3 local orbital density functional method for band structure calculations of insulating and metallic solids is described and the method for calculating semilocal pseudopotential matrix elements and basis functions are detailed together with other unpublished parts of the methodology pertaining to gradient functionals and local orbital basis sets.
Abstract: Recent extensions of the DMol3 local orbital density functional method for band structure calculations of insulating and metallic solids are described. Furthermore the method for calculating semilocal pseudopotential matrix elements and basis functions are detailed together with other unpublished parts of the methodology pertaining to gradient functionals and local orbital basis sets. The method is applied to calculations of the enthalpy of formation of a set of molecules and solids. We find that the present numerical localized basis sets yield improved results as compared to previous results for the same functionals. Enthalpies for the formation of H, N, O, F, Cl, and C, Si, S atoms from the thermodynamic reference states are calculated at the same level of theory. It is found that the performance in predicting molecular enthalpies of formation is markedly improved for the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996)] functional.

8,496 citations