scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Peter Rachleff

Bio: Peter Rachleff is an academic researcher from Macalester College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Social history & New Deal. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 15 publications receiving 145 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Workers make a New Deal as discussed by the authors, becoming a union rank and file, encountering mass culture and competing loyalty at the workplace, and finding common ground in workers' common ground Conclusion.
Abstract: Preface Introduction 1. Living and working in Chicago in 1919 2. Ethnicity in the New Era 3. Encountering mass culture 4. Contested loyalty at the workplace 5. Adrift in the Great Depression 6. Workers make a New Deal 7. Becoming a union rank and file 8. Workers' common ground Conclusion.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A detailed account of the intellectual history of the field of industrial relations, its relationship to personnel management (and related fields such as organizational behavior), and the historical development of the major institutions of Industrial Relations in American academe, including university degree programs and professional associations is given in this paper.
Abstract: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (IR) developed as a distinct academic subject and field of study nearly three-quarters of a century ago. This book provides a historical survey of the origins and development of the field in the United States and an analysis of the factors that contributed both to the field's ascendancy in the decade after World War II and to its sharp decline in the 1980s. The book has three objectives. The first is to provide a detailed account of the intellectual history of the field of industrial relations, its relationship to personnel management (and related fields such as organizational behavior), and the historical development of the major institutions of industrial relations in American academe, including university degree programs and professional associations. The second objective is to assess the reasons for the marked decline in the field's intellectual and organizational for, tunes over the last two decades, a decline that has proceeded to the point that the continued existence of industrial relations programs at a number of universities is threatened. Finally, the third objective is to develop a strategy for change that will preserve and strengthen industrial relations as a field of study, if not in name then in intellectual spirit.

28 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The incidence of medically diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) accelerated in the 1980s, followed in the 1990s by an increasing incidence in elderly people and the elderly, which may have significant health policy implications given the aging population.
Abstract: Objective: To assess temporal trends in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence, surgical treatment, and work-related lost time. Methods: Incident CTS and first-time carpal tunnel release among Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents were identified using the medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project; 80% of a sample were confirmed by medical record review. Work-related CTS was identified from the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry. Results: Altogether, 10,069 Olmsted County residents were initially diagnosed with CTS in 1981–2005. Overall incidence (adjusted to the 2000 US population) was 491 and 258 per 100,000 person-years for women vs men ( p p Conclusions: The incidence of medically diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) accelerated in the 1980s. The cause of the increase is unclear, but it corresponds to an epidemic of CTS cases resulting in lost work days that began in the mid-1980s and lasted through the mid-1990s. The elderly present with more severe disease and are more likely to have carpal tunnel surgery, which may have significant health policy implications given the aging population.

205 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that changes in workplace characteristics over the last few decades may affect work relationships and call for adjustments in the traditional theoretical framework used to understand them, and they refer to these models as "hybrid" as they integrate traditional SET premises with new-era workplace characteristics.
Abstract: In this article, we argue that changes in workplace characteristics over the last few decades may affect work relationships and call for adjustments in the traditional theoretical framework used to understand them. Since the last quarter of the 20th century, there have been theories regarding changes in labor relationships following technological, political, globalization, and economical changes. However, we examine the changes in light of psychological theories rather than labor or industrial approaches. We review four main areas where social exchange theory (SET) has been implemented, address recent changes that challenge the traditional SET perspective, and propose alternative models. We refer to these models as “hybrid” as they integrate traditional SET premises with new-era workplace characteristics. First, we describe several changes in workplace characteristics. Next, we review some of the most conventional applications of SET to work relationships. Finally, we critically examine whether this theory meets the requirements of work relationships in the new world of work and conclude by arguing that SET needs to be adjusted to reflect the assumption that frequent changes in employee and organizational characteristics in the new workplaces require similar frequent adjustments in exchange relationships.

131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Workplace issues have been recast as matters for the wider community engaging a diverse set of actors including workers, community organizations, contractors, clients, the media and London's politicians.
Abstract: This article tells the story of community and union-led efforts to re-regulate the contract cleaning sector and to organize cleaners at Canary Wharf and in the City of London. It provides a historical overview of the campaign and highlights its innovative responses to subcontracted employment in the city today. The article starts by outlining anti-essentialist approaches to the politics of class before using the campaign to flesh out what such politics might look like. In this case, the successful prosecution of class politics has depended upon the politics of class moving far beyond any particular workplace. Workplace issues have been recast as matters for the wider community engaging a diverse set of actors including workers, community organizations, contractors, clients, the media and London’s politicians.

112 citations