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Peter Selinger

Bio: Peter Selinger is an academic researcher from Dalhousie University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Quantum computer & Quantum circuit. The author has an hindex of 29, co-authored 83 publications receiving 4155 citations. Previous affiliations of Peter Selinger include Stanford University & University of Pennsylvania.


Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a reference guide to various notions of monoidal categories and their associated string diagrams is presented, which is useful not only to mathematicians, but also to physicists, computer scientists, and others who use diagrammatic reasoning.
Abstract: This article is intended as a reference guide to various notions of monoidal categories and their associated string diagrams It is hoped that this will be useful not just to mathematicians, but also to physicists, computer scientists, and others who use diagrammatic reasoning We have opted for a somewhat informal treatment of topological notions, and have omitted most proofs Nevertheless, the exposition is sufficiently detailed to make it clear what is presently known, and to serve as a starting place for more in-depth study Where possible, we provide pointers to more rigorous treatments in the literature Where we include results that have only been proved in special cases, we indicate this in the form of caveats

732 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes the syntax and semantics of a simple quantum programming language with high-level features such as loops, recursive procedures, and structured data types, and has an interesting denotational semantics in terms of complete partial orders of superoperators.
Abstract: We propose the design of a programming language for quantum computing. Traditionally, quantum algorithms are frequently expressed at the hardware level, for instance in terms of the quantum circuit model or quantum Turing machines. These approaches do not encourage structured programming or abstractions such as data types. In this paper, we describe the syntax and semantics of a simple quantum programming language with high-level features such as loops, recursive procedures, and structured data types. The language is functional in nature, statically typed, free of run-time errors, and has an interesting denotational semantics in terms of complete partial orders of superoperators.

510 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work presents a graphical language for dagger compact closed categories, and sketches a proof of its completeness for equational reasoning, and gives a general construction, the CPM construction, which associates to each Dagger compact closed category its ''category of completely positive maps'', and shows that the resulting category is again dagger compactclosed.

490 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
16 Jun 2013
TL;DR: Quipper, a scalable, expressive, functional, higher-order quantum programming language, which is geared towards a model of computation that uses a classical computer to control a quantum device, but is not dependent on any particular model of quantum hardware.
Abstract: The field of quantum algorithms is vibrant. Still, there is currently a lack of programming languages for describing quantum computation on a practical scale, i.e., not just at the level of toy problems. We address this issue by introducing Quipper, a scalable, expressive, functional, higher-order quantum programming language. Quipper has been used to program a diverse set of non-trivial quantum algorithms, and can generate quantum gate representations using trillions of gates. It is geared towards a model of computation that uses a classical computer to control a quantum device, but is not dependent on any particular model of quantum hardware. Quipper has proven effective and easy to use, and opens the door towards using formal methods to analyze quantum algorithms.

403 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A class of circuits whose T- depth can be reduced to 1 by using sufficiently many ancillas is described, and it is shown that the cost of adding an additional control to any controlled gate is at most 8 additional T-gates, and T-depth 2.
Abstract: We give a $\text{Clifford}+T$ representation of the Toffoli gate of $T$-depth one, using four ancillas. More generally, we describe a class of circuits whose $T$-depth can be reduced to one by using sufficiently many ancillas. We show that the cost of adding an additional control to any controlled gate is at most eight additional $T$ gates and $T$-depth two. We also show that the circuit $THT$ does not possess a $T$-depth one representation with an arbitrary number of ancillas initialized to $|0\ensuremath{\rangle}$.

199 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper has reviewed several algorithms based on both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks as well as a most important result: the computational universality of both continuous- and discrete- time quantum walks.
Abstract: Quantum walks, the quantum mechanical counterpart of classical random walks, is an advanced tool for building quantum algorithms that has been recently shown to constitute a universal model of quantum computation. Quantum walks is now a solid field of research of quantum computation full of exciting open problems for physicists, computer scientists and engineers. In this paper we review theoretical advances on the foundations of both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks, together with the role that randomness plays in quantum walks, the connections between the mathematical models of coined discrete quantum walks and continuous quantum walks, the quantumness of quantum walks, a summary of papers published on discrete quantum walks and entanglement as well as a succinct review of experimental proposals and realizations of discrete-time quantum walks. Furthermore, we have reviewed several algorithms based on both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks as well as a most important result: the computational universality of both continuous- and discrete-time quantum walks.

883 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications as well as practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.
Abstract: During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

809 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a reference guide to various notions of monoidal categories and their associated string diagrams is presented, which is useful not only to mathematicians, but also to physicists, computer scientists, and others who use diagrammatic reasoning.
Abstract: This article is intended as a reference guide to various notions of monoidal categories and their associated string diagrams It is hoped that this will be useful not just to mathematicians, but also to physicists, computer scientists, and others who use diagrammatic reasoning We have opted for a somewhat informal treatment of topological notions, and have omitted most proofs Nevertheless, the exposition is sufficiently detailed to make it clear what is presently known, and to serve as a starting place for more in-depth study Where possible, we provide pointers to more rigorous treatments in the literature Where we include results that have only been proved in special cases, we indicate this in the form of caveats

732 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the theoretical prediction, experimental realization, and potential use of Majorana zero modes in future information processing devices through braiding-based topological quantum computation.
Abstract: We provide a current perspective on the rapidly developing field of Majorana zero modes in solid state systems. We emphasize the theoretical prediction, experimental realization, and potential use of Majorana zero modes in future information processing devices through braiding-based topological quantum computation. Well-separated Majorana zero modes should manifest non-Abelian braiding statistics suitable for unitary gate operations for topological quantum computation. Recent experimental work, following earlier theoretical predictions, has shown specific signatures consistent with the existence of Majorana modes localized at the ends of semiconductor nanowires in the presence of superconducting proximity effect. We discuss the experimental findings and their theoretical analyses, and provide a perspective on the extent to which the observations indicate the existence of anyonic Majorana zero modes in solid state systems. We also discuss fractional quantum Hall systems (the 5/2 state) in this context. We describe proposed schemes for carrying out braiding with Majorana zero modes as well as the necessary steps for implementing topological quantum computation.

655 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This paper focuses on quantum information protocols, which exploit quantum-mechanical effects in an essential way and form the basis for novel and potentially very important applications to secure and fault-tolerant communication and computation.
Abstract: We study quantum information and computation from a novel point of view. Our approach is based on recasting the standard axiomatic presentation of quantum mechanics, due to von Neumann, at a more abstract level, of compact closed categories with biproducts. We show how the essential structures found in key quantum information protocols such as teleportation, logic-gate teleportation, and entanglement-swapping can be captured at this abstract level. Moreover, from the combination of the --apparently purely qualitative-- structures of compact closure and biproducts there emerge `scalars` and a `Born rule'. This abstract and structural point of view opens up new possibilities for describing and reasoning about quantum systems. It also shows the degrees of axiomatic freedom: we can show what requirements are placed on the (semi)ring of scalars C(I,I), where C is the category and I is the tensor unit, in order to perform various protocols such as teleportation. Our formalism captures both the information-flow aspect of the protocols (see quant-ph/0402014), and the branching due to quantum indeterminism. This contrasts with the standard accounts, in which the classical information flows are `outside' the usual quantum-mechanical formalism.

636 citations