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Phik-Wern Loo

Researcher at University College London

Publications -  8
Citations -  211

Phik-Wern Loo is an academic researcher from University College London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Mental health literacy & Spelling. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 8 publications receiving 186 citations.

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Art students who cannot draw: Exploring the relations between drawing ability, visual memory, accuracy of copying, and dyslexia.

TL;DR: This paper found that poor drawing may be a particular problem for students with dyslexia (and a high proportion of art school students is dyslexic), and that poor drawers are less good at copying simple angles and proportions.
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Mental health literacy: A cross-cultural study from Britain, Hong Kong and Malaysia.

TL;DR: A cross‐cultural study was conducted on the identification of psychiatric problems comparing British, Hong Kong and Malaysian participants.
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Public knowledge and beliefs about depression among urban and rural Malays in Malaysia.

TL;DR: Knowing and beliefs about depression among Malaysian Malays varying in socioeconomic status showed that urban participants were more likely to use psychiatric labels for the two vignettes, whereas rural participants tended to use more generic terms (‘emotional stress’).
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Does shape constancy relate to drawing ability? Two failures to replicate.

TL;DR: In this paper, the extent of shape constancy (phenomenal regression) correlates with drawing ability, there being a "robust negative relation between perceptual errors resulting from shape-constancy and drawing accuracy".
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Public knowledge and beliefs about depression among urban and rural Chinese in Malaysia

TL;DR: The study compared knowledge and beliefs about depression among urban and rural Chinese in a Malaysian sample and found that depression literacy was moderate for Chinese Malaysians and the causes most strongly endorsed were stress and pressure.