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Philip Hardie

Bio: Philip Hardie is an academic researcher from University of Cambridge. The author has contributed to research in topics: Poetry & Medicine. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 42 publications receiving 1805 citations.
Topics: Poetry, Medicine, Literature, Poetics, Nursing


Papers
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Book
10 Apr 1986

274 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Hardie and Kennedy as discussed by the authors discussed the relationship between Ovid and early imperial literature and the professional discourses of scholarship, religion, and rhetoric in the Metamorphoses of Ovid.
Abstract: List of illustrations List of contributors Preface Introduction Philip Hardie Part I. Contexts and History: 1. Ovid and ancient literary history Richard Tarrant 2. Ovid and early imperial literature Philip Hardie 3. Ovid and empire Thomas Habinek 4. Ovid and the professional discourses of scholarship, religion, rhetoric Alessandro Schiesaro Part II. Themes and Works: 5. Ovid and genre: evolutions of an elegist Stephen Harrison 6. Gender and sexuality Alison Sharrock 7. Myth in Ovid Fritz Graf 8. Landscape with figures: aesthetics of place in the Metamorphoses and its tradition Stephen Hinds 9. Ovid and the discourses of love: the amatory works Alison Sharrock 10. Metamorphosis in the Metamorphoses Andrew Feldherr 11. Narrative technique and narratology in the Metamorphoses Alessandro Barchiesi 12. Mandati memores: political and poetic authority in the Fasti Carole Newlands 13. Epistolarity: the Heroides Duncan F. Kennedy 14. Ovid's exile poetry: Tristia, Epistulae ex Ponto and Ibis Gareth Williams Part III. Reception: 15. Ovid in English translation Raphael Lyne 16. Ovid in the Middle Ages: authority and poetry Jeremy Dimmick 17. Love and exile after Ovid Raphael Lyne 18. Re-embodying Ovid: Renaissance afterlives Colin Burrow 19. Recent receptions of Ovid Duncan F. Kennedy 20. Ovid and art Christopher Allen Dateline Works cited Index.

211 citations

Book
17 Dec 1992
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss closure and continution, sacrifice and substitution, Heaven and Hell, and succession: fathers, poets, princes, princes Bibliography and references.
Abstract: 1. Closure and continution 2. Sacrifice and substitution 3. Heaven and hell 4. Succession: fathers, poets, princes Bibliography.

162 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a list of illustrations for the modern novel Bibliography index of modern authors Index of passages discussed General index.List of illustrations Acknowledgements 1. Introduction 2. Impossible objects of desire 3. Death, desire and monuments 4. The Heroides 5. Narcissus: the mirror of the text 6. Pygmalion: art and illusion 7. Conjugal conjurings 8. The exile poetry 10.
Abstract: List of illustrations Acknowledgements 1. Introduction 2. Impossible objects of desire 3. Death, desire and monuments 4. The Heroides 5. Narcissus: the mirror of the text 6. Pygmalion: art and illusion 7. Absent presences of language 8. Conjugal conjurings 9. The exile poetry 10. Ovid recalled in the modern novel Bibliography Index of modern authors Index of passages discussed General index.

151 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a list of illustrations for the modern novel Bibliography index of modern authors Index of passages discussed General index.List of illustrations Acknowledgements 1. Introduction 2. Impossible objects of desire 3. Death, desire and monuments 4. The Heroides 5. Narcissus: the mirror of the text 6. Pygmalion: art and illusion 7. Conjugal conjurings 8. The exile poetry 10.
Abstract: List of illustrations Acknowledgements 1. Introduction 2. Impossible objects of desire 3. Death, desire and monuments 4. The Heroides 5. Narcissus: the mirror of the text 6. Pygmalion: art and illusion 7. Absent presences of language 8. Conjugal conjurings 9. The exile poetry 10. Ovid recalled in the modern novel Bibliography Index of modern authors Index of passages discussed General index.

140 citations


Cited by
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Book
15 Dec 2005
TL;DR: Adaptation and Appropriation as discussed by the authors explores the cultural and aesthetic politics behind the impulse to adapt, and the impact of new digital technologies on ideas of making, originality and customization.
Abstract: From the apparently simple adaptation of a text into film, theatre or a new literary work, to the more complex appropriation of style or meaning, it is arguable that all texts are somehow connected to a network of existing texts and art forms. In this new edition Adaptation and Appropriation explores: multiple definitions and practices of adaptation and appropriation the cultural and aesthetic politics behind the impulse to adapt the global and local dimensions of adaptation the impact of new digital technologies on ideas of making, originality and customization diverse ways in which contemporary literature, theatre, television and film adapt, revise and reimagine other works of art the impact on adaptation and appropriation of theoretical movements, including structuralism, post-structuralism, postcolonialism, postmodernism, feminism and gender studies the appropriation across time and across cultures of specific canonical texts, by Shakespeare, Dickens, and others, but also of literary archetypes such as myth or fairy tale. Ranging across genres and harnessing concepts from fields as diverse as musicology and the natural sciences, this volume brings clarity to the complex debates around adaptation and appropriation, offering a much-needed resource for those studying literature, film, media or culture.

558 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, a translation of Muse e modelli: la poesia ellenistica da Alessandro Magno ad Augusto, Greek poetry of the third and second centuries BC and its reception and influence at Rome are explored allowing both sides of this literary practice to be appreciated.
Abstract: Hellenistic poets of the third and second centuries BC were concerned with the need both to mark their continuity with the classical past and to demonstrate their independence from it. In this revised and expanded translation of Muse e modelli: la poesia ellenistica da Alessandro Magno ad Augusto, Greek poetry of the third and second centuries BC and its reception and influence at Rome are explored allowing both sides of this literary practice to be appreciated. Genres as diverse as epic and epigram are considered from a historical perspective, in the full range of their deep-level structures, providing a different perspective on the poetry and its influence at Rome. Some of the most famous poetry of the age such as Callimachus' Aitia and Apollonius' Argonautica is examined. In addition, full attention is paid to the poetry of encomium, in particular the newly published epigrams of Posidippus, and Hellenistic poetics, notably Philodemus.

214 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81-96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81–96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms. As poems of praise, they delight in poetic excess whether they honour the emperor or the poet's friends. Yet extravagant speech is also capacious speech. It functions as a strategy for conveying the wealth and grandeur of villas, statues and precious works of art as well as the complex emotions aroused by the material and political culture of empire. The Silvae are the product of a divided, self-fashioning voice. Statius was born in Naples of non-aristocratic parents. His position as outsider to the culture he celebrates gives him a unique perspective on it. The Silvae are poems of anxiety as well as praise, expressive of the tensions within the later period of Domitian's reign.

127 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Yunis as mentioned in this paper discusses why written texts have been used in literature and philosophy from the perspective of writing and culture in the classical Greece and the emergence of critical readers in the early fourth century BC.
Abstract: Preface Contributors Introduction: why written texts? Harvey Yunis 1. From letters to literature: reading the 'song culture' of classical Greece Andrew Ford 2. Writing religion: inscribed texts, ritual authority and the religious discourse of the Polis Albert Henrichs 3. Letters of the law: written texts in archaic Greek law Michael Gagarin 4. Writing, law and legal practice in the Athenian courts David Cohen 5. Literacy and the charlatan in ancient Greek medicine Lesley Dean-Jones 6. Literacy in Greek and Chinese science: some comparative issues Geoffrey Lloyd 7. Writing philosophy: prose and poetry from Thales to Plato Charles H. Kahn 8. Prose performance texts: Epideixis and written publication in the late fifth and early fourth centuries Rosalind Thomas 9. Writing for reading: Thucydides, Plato and the emergence of the critical reader Harvey Yunis 10. Reflecting on writing and culture: Theocritus and the style of cultural change Richard Hunter Bibliography Index.

123 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, sexual virtue on display: the cults of pudicitia and honours for women, traditional narratives and Livy's Roman history, and Valerius Maximus: the complexities of past as paradigm.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Sexual virtue on display: the cults of pudicitia and honours for women 2. Traditional narratives and Livy's Roman history 3. Valerius Maximus: the complexities of past as paradigm 4. Subversive genres: testing the limits of pudicitia 5. Declamation: what part of 'no' do you understand? 6. Sexual virtue on display II: oratory and the speeches of Cicero 7. Imperial narrative, imperial interventions.

123 citations