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Phillip B. Zarrilli

Other affiliations: McGill University
Bio: Phillip B. Zarrilli is an academic researcher from University of Exeter. The author has contributed to research in topics: Martial arts & Dance. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 58 publications receiving 1759 citations. Previous affiliations of Phillip B. Zarrilli include McGill University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Turner as discussed by the authors elaborates on ritual and theatre, persona and individual, role-playing and performing, taking examples from American, European, and African societies for a greater understanding of culture and its symbols.
Abstract: How is social action related to aesthetics, and anthropology to theatre? What is the meaning of such concepts as \"work,\" \"play, \"liminal,\" and \"flow\"? In this highly influential book, Turner elaborates on ritual and theatre, persona and individual, role-playing and performing, taking examples from American, European, and African societies for a greater understanding of culture and its symbols.

916 citations

Book
26 Nov 2008
TL;DR: Barba as mentioned in this paper describes a psychophysical approach to acting and the actor's "I can" as a way of "playing in-between" in a production case study of a play.
Abstract: Foreword by Eugenio Barba. A preface in three voices. Introduction: a psychophysical approach to acting Part 1: What is the actor's work? 1. Historical context 2. Beginning with the breath 3. An enactive approach to acting and embodiment Part 2: Work on oneself 4. The source traditions: yoga, kalarippayattu, and taiqiquan 5. The psychophysical actor's "I can" 6. Exercises for "playing" in-between: structured improvisations Part 3: Production case studies 7. The Beckett Project 8. The Water Station by Ota Shogo 9. Speaking Stones: Images, voices, fragments ... from that which comes after, with Text by Kaite O'Reilly and German translation by Frank Heibert 10. 4:48 Psychosis by Sarah Kane 11. Attempts on Her Life by Martin Crimp

122 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: A study of kalarippayattu, one of India's traditional martial and medical arts dating from at least the 12th century AD, is presented in this paper.
Abstract: This is a study of kalarippayattu, one of India's traditional martial and medical arts dating from at least the 12th century AD. Based on 20 years of research and practice in Kerala, this study traces how kalarippayattu is a mode of cultural practice through which bodies, knowledges, powers, agency, selves, and identities are constantly repositioned. This book is intended for academics over a wide range of disciplines, historians, anthropologists, those interested in theatre studies, performance studies and cultural studies, those practising dance and kalari , those interested in Kerala and South Asian Studies.

92 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a post-Merleau-Ponty phenomenology is used to understand the embodied work of the actor in the performance of an actor. But, like all accounts of embodiment and experience, this one is necessarily limited by our propositional modes of representation, since it is extremely difficult to express the full meaning of our experience.
Abstract: How can the contemporary actor’s body and experience in performance be theorized? 2 What methodological tools are useful in an attempt to better understand the embodied work of the actor? This essay applies one among a set of complimentary methodological tools to this question—a post‐Merleau-Ponty phenomenology. 3 Like all accounts of embodiment and experience this one is necessarily limited by “our propositional modes of representation,” since it is extremely difficult “to express the full meaning of our experience.” 4 In spite of such limitations, this essay is intended to contribute to phenomenological studies of embodiment by extending their focus from

81 citations

BookDOI
28 Jun 2005
TL;DR: Zarrilli as mentioned in this paper discussed the difference between theory and practice in acting and the difference in performance theory between the former and the latter, and proposed a psychophysiological method for training actors.
Abstract: List of illustrations Contributors Preface Acknowledgements 1. General Introduction: Between theory and practice Phillip B. Zarrilli part I Theories and Meditations on Acting 2. Introduction Phillip B. Zarrilli 3. The Actor's Presence: Three phenomenal modes Bert O. States 4. On Acting and Not-Acting Michael Kirby 5. "Just Be Your Self": Logocentrism and difference in performance theory Philip Auslander 6. The Actor's Emotions Reconsidered: A psychological task-based perspective Elly Konijn Part II (Re)Considering the Body and Training 7. Introduction Phillip B. Zarrilli 8. An Amulet Made of Memory: The significance of exercises in the actor's dramaturgy Eugenio Barba 9. Meyerhold's Biomechanics Mel Gordon 10. Etienne Decroux's Promethan Mime Deidre Sklar 11. Actor Training in the Neutral Mask Sears A. Eldredge and Hollis W. Huston 12. Bali and Grotowski: Some parallels in the training process I. Wayan Lendra 13. Culture is the Body Tadashi Suzuki 14. My Bodies: The performer in West Java Kathy Foley 15. "On the edge of a breath, looking": Cultivating the actor's bodymind through Asian martial/meditation arts Phillip B. Zarrilli 16. The Gardzenice Theatre Association of Poland Paul Allain 17. Effector Patterns of Basic Emotions: A psychophysiological method for training actors Susana Bloch, Pedro Orthous and Guy Santibanez-H Part III (Re)Considering the Actor in Performance 18. Introduction Phillip B. Zarrilli 19. Brecht and the Contradictory Actor John Rouse 20. Dario Fo: The roar of the clown Ron Jenkins 21. Forum Theatre Augusto Boal 22. Resisting the "Organic": A feminist actor's approach Lauren Love 23. Rachel Rosenthal Creating Her Selves Eelka Lampe 24. Task and Vision: Willem Dafoe in LSD Philip Auslander 25. David Warrilow: Creating symbol and cipher Laurie Lassiter 26. Robert Wilson and the Actor: Performing in Danton's Death Ellen Halperin-Royer 27. Anna Deavere Smith: Part I: the World Becomes You: and interview with Carol Martin Part II: Acting as Incorporation . Richard Schechner Notes Bibliography and References Cited Bibliographical Note: Actors speaking on acting Index

73 citations


Cited by
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1,124 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A theory of cultural pragmatics that transcends this division, bringing meaning structures, contingency, power, and materiality together in a new way, is presented in this paper, where the materiality of practices should be replaced by the more multidimensional concept of performances.
Abstract: From its very beginnings, the social study of culture has been polarized between structuralist theories that treat meaning as a text and investigate the patterning that provides relative autonomy and pragmatist theories that treat meaning as emerging from the contingencies of individual and collective action—so-called practices—and that analyze cultural patterns as reflections of power and material interest. In this article, I present a theory of cultural pragmatics that transcends this division, bringing meaning structures, contingency, power, and materiality together in a new way. My argument is that the materiality of practices should be replaced by the more multidimensional concept of performances. Drawing on the new field of performance studies, cultural pragmatics demonstrates how social performances whether individual or collective can be analogized systematically to theatrical ones. After defining the elements of social performance, I suggest that these elements have become “de-fused” as societies...

816 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the ethical dimensions of the ethnography of performance and perform as a moral act in the context of performing as an act of self-criticism.
Abstract: (1985). Performing as a moral act: Ethical dimensions of the ethnography of performance. Literature in Performance: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 1-13.

470 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors put forward the hypothesis that the biological function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events, and to rehearse threat perception and threat avoidance, which is supported by empirical evidence from normative dream content, children's dreams, recurrent dreams, nightmares, post traumatic dreams, and the dreams of hunter-gatherers.
Abstract: Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is consistently and powerfully modulated by certain types of waking experiences. On the basis of this evidence, I put forward the hypothesis that the biological function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events, and to rehearse threat perception and threat avoidance. To evaluate this hypothesis, we need to consider the original evolutionary context of dreaming and the possible traces it has left in the dream content of the present human population. In the ancestral environment human life was short and full of threats. Any behavioral advantage in dealing with highly dangerous events would have increased the probability of reproductive success. A dream-production mechanism that tends to select threatening waking events and simulate them over and over again in various combinations would have been valuable for the development and maintenance of threat-avoidance skills. Empirical evidence from normative dream content, children's dreams, recurrent dreams, nightmares, post traumatic dreams, and the dreams of hunter-gatherers indicates that our dream-production mechanisms are in fact specialized in the simulation of threatening events, and thus provides support to the threat simulation hypothesis of the function of dreaming.

467 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of how facts are talked about and experienced in struggles over these emergent, contested illnesses in the US finds that sufferers describe their experiences of being denied healthcare and legitimacy through bureaucratic categories of exclusion as dependent upon their lack of biological facts.

403 citations