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Phillip Barnard

Bio: Phillip Barnard is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Literary criticism & German. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 321 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Lacoue-Labarthe as discussed by the authors presents a theory of literature in German Romanticism at the intersection of the 19th and the 18th centuries, which he calls The Literary Absolute.
Abstract: title : The Literary Absolute : The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism Intersections (Albany, N.Y.) author : Lacoue-Labarthe, Philippe.; Nancy, Jean-Luc. publisher : State University of New York Press isbn10 | asin : 0887066615 print isbn13 : 9780887066610 ebook isbn13 : 9780585091761 language : English subject Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi publication date : 1988 lcc : PT363.P6L3 1988eb ddc : 830/.9/145 subject : Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi

327 citations


Cited by
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Book
24 Oct 2006
TL;DR: The Bureaucracy of Beauty as discussed by the authors is a wide-ranging work of cultural theory that connects literary studies, postcoloniality, the history of architecture and design, and the history and present of empire.
Abstract: The Bureaucracy of Beauty is a wide-ranging work of cultural theory that connects literary studies, postcoloniality, the history of architecture and design, and the history and present of empire. Professor Ananya Roy of UC Berkeley calls it a "fantastic book," and in many ways this is the best description of it. The Bureaucracy of Beauty begins with nineteenth-century Britain's Department of Science and Arts, a venture organized by the Board of Trade, and how the DSA exerted a powerful influence on the growth of museums, design schools, and architecture throughout the British Empire. But this is only the book's literal subject: in a remarkable set of chapters, Dutta explores the development of international laws of intellectual property, ideas of design pedagogy, the technological distinction between craft and industry, the relation of colonial tutelage to economic policy, the politics and technology of exhibition, and competing philosophies of aesthetics. His thinking across these areas is ignited by engagements with Benjamin, Marx, Adam Smith and Jeremy Bentham, Kant, Mill, Ruskin, and Gandhi. A rich study in the history of ideas, of design and architecture, and of cultural politics, The Bureaucracy of Beauty converges on the issues of present-day globalization. From nineteenth-century Britain to twenty-first century America, The Bureaucracy of Beauty offers a theory of how things - big things -change.

113 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using the concept of romantic irony theorized by F. Schlegel and Kierkegaard, the author interprets gender in Jane Austen's Emma and Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater, showing how ideas of masculinity and femininity have been thoroughly undermined and that, in a vital ironic gesture, nothing has been allowed to replace them as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Using the concept of romantic irony theorized by F. Schlegel and Kierkegaard, the author interprets gender in Jane Austen's Emma and Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater, showing how ideas of masculinity and femininity have been thoroughly undermined and that, in a vital ironic gesture, nothing has been allowed to replace them.

101 citations

Book
03 Apr 2017
TL;DR: In this article, Williams draws upon the history of literature, philosophy, and religion, as well as upon economic history, to support his detailed and illuminating accounts of Raphael's major works and provides hypotheses about the aims and aspirations of Italian Renaissance art in general and the nature of art-historical inquiry.
Abstract: Raphael was one of the most important artists of the Italian Renaissance and one of the most important and influential in the entire history of art. His practice of 'synthetic' or 'critical' imitation became a model of creative method; his engagement with the principle of decorum revealed its deeper expressive and philosophical significance and the operation of his workshop helped to redefine the nature of the work that artists do. Robert Williams draws upon the history of literature, philosophy, and religion, as well as upon economic history, to support his detailed and illuminating accounts of Raphael's major works. His analyses serve as the foundation for a set of hypotheses about the aims and aspirations of Italian Renaissance art in general and the nature of art-historical inquiry.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Post-structuralism and complexity are plural and diverse modes of thought that share a common subscription to the anteriority of radical relationality as mentioned in this paper. But complexity remains strategic in its bid to become a power-knowledge of the laws of becoming.
Abstract: Post-structuralism and complexity are plural and diverse modes of thought that share a common subscription to the �anteriority of radical relationality�. They nonetheless subscribe to a different ethic of life because they address the anteriority of radical relationality in different ways. Complexity remains strategic in its bid to become a power-knowledge of the laws of becoming. It derives that strategic ethic from its scientific interest in the implicate order of non-linearity that is said to subvert Newtonian science. Post-structuralism is poetic. It derives its poetic ethic from Heidegger and from the re-working of orphic and tragic sensibilities to radical relationality with the radically non-relational. Observing that all poetry is complexity avant la lettre, the paper illustrates these points with the Odyssey and concludes that while complexity is ultimately concerned with fitness, post-structuralism is pre-occupied with justice.

89 citations

22 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The authors examined the difference that educated and mostly male white southerners had about history at the level of historiography and other texts among themselves and in relation to "modern history" mostly in the states of Virginia and South Carolina in the first four decades of the 19th century.
Abstract: This thesis examines the nature–origin, character, and temporal change–of the difference that educated and mostly male white southerners had about history at the level of historiography and other texts among themselves and in relation to “modern history” mostly in the states of Virginia and South Carolina in the first four decades of the 19th century. The study compares and contrasts such postulate with two other areas of cultural discussion that included, but was not limited to, history. The first is the locality of New England, with some support from the Mid–Atlantic States New York and Pennsylvania. By the 1790s, these areas dominated the national intellectual landscape of U.S. culture. The individuals resided, grew up, educated or published in these states. The second is the change about culture that was initiated in Europe roughly after the 1750s the thesis refers to as “modern history”. It transformed history into a major area of interest and cultural component. History attained a status it had previously lacked within Western modernity. The practical method is mainly a scanning of digitalized online contemporary printed sources–mostly leading books about history, leading contemporary journals, letter collections, and historical novels mostly produced in the U.S.–for word “history” and a variant “histor” that yields for example “historical” and “histories”. In order to reveal the southern difference, the findings have then been subjected to the study’s theoretical and methodological framework. Instead of being a scientific undertaking, linguistically neutral, or grounded in material reality as usually treated in the U.S., written history overlaps with other text production and communication such as literary writing, poetics, and cultural discourse. The philosophy of modernity and scientific truth history became associated with in its modern guise can be read as a metaphysical problem and crisis of especial severity in the southern areas. There, modern history entailed an experiential and communicative renovation that extended to individuals and their relationship to society. Through partly deductive, partly poetic readings, the study charts the course of this change that spans from syntax to discourse, philosophy, semiotics and poetics. Some key individuals, many rather obscure today, are identified. The concerns help reveal the tension of modern association of reality with history that has obscured and forgotten competing claims about and experiences of this relationship. The New England–led “bloc” departed from European skepticism at first still present in modern history as well. Virginia and South Carolina seldom rejected the European critical tradition. Modern history became disseminated more only in the 1840s, comparatively more in South Carolina. Previously, it was rare to see history as romantic, evangelical or scientific like in New England. Especially until the late–1830s, history predating modern history was combined with skeptical and ironic views about the history– reality relationship. Unlike often portrayed, these learned white southerners were rarely sentimentalists. Equally rare was to conflate reality and science with history for nationalist ends and mold useful (white, male) citizens. Forgotten perspectives and agencies can be re–examined by including more recent theories about history and language.

71 citations