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Author

Pierre A. Humblet

Bio: Pierre A. Humblet is an academic researcher from Institut Eurécom. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Communication channel & Optical filter. The author has an hindex of 29, co-authored 76 publication(s) receiving 8435 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Pierre A. Humblet include IBM & Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Raymond Knopp1, Pierre A. Humblet1Institutions (1)
18 Jun 1995
TL;DR: By examining the bit error-rate with antipodal signalling, it is shown that an increase in capacity over a perfectly-power controlled (Gaussian) channel can be achieved, especially if the number of users is large, and the inherent diversity in multiuser communications over fading channels is shown.
Abstract: We consider a power control scheme for maximizing the information capacity of the uplink in single-cell multiuser communications with frequency-flat fading, under the assumption that the users attenuations are measured perfectly. Its main characteristics are that only one user transmits over the entire bandwidth at any particular time instant and that the users are allocated more power when their channels are good, and less when they are bad. Moreover, these features are independent of the statistics of the fading. Numerical results are presented for the case of single-path Rayleigh fading. We show that an increase in capacity over a perfectly-power controlled (Gaussian) channel can be achieved, especially if the number of users is large. By examining the bit error-rate with antipodal signalling, we show the inherent diversity in multiuser communications over fading channels.

2,247 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A distributed algorithm is presented that constructs the minimum weight spanning tree in a connected undirected graph with distinct edge weights that can be initiated spontaneously at any node or at any subset of nodes.
Abstract: Abstract : A distributed algorithm is presented that constructs the minimum weight spanning tree in a connected undirected graph with distinct edge weights. A processor exists at each node of the graph, knowing initially only the weights of the adjacent edges. The processors obey the same algorithm and exchange messages with neighbors until the tree is constructed. The total number of messages required for a graph of N nodes and E edges is at most 5N log of N to the base 2 + 2E and a message contains at most one edge weight plus log of 8N to the base 2 bits. The algorithm can be initiated spontaneously at any node or at any subset of nodes.

1,111 citations


ReportDOI
01 Oct 1979
Abstract: : A distributed algorithm is presented that constructs the minimum weight spanning tree in a connected undirected graph with distinct edge weights. A processor exists at each node of the graph, knowing initially only the weights of the adjacent edges. The processors obey the same algorithm and exchange messages with neighbors until the tree is constructed. The total number of messages required for a graph of N nodes and E edges is at most 5N log of N to the base 2 + 2E and a message contains at most one edge weight plus log of 8N to the base 2 bits. The algorithm can be initiated spontaneously at any node or at any subset of nodes.

1,059 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Richard A. Barry1, Pierre A. Humblet2Institutions (2)
02 Apr 1995
TL;DR: A traffic model for circuit switched all-optical networks (AONs) is introduced which is used to calculate the blocking probability along a path for networks with and without wavelength changers.
Abstract: We introduce a traffic model for circuit switched all-optical networks (AONs) which we then use to calculate the blocking probability along a path for networks with and without wavelength changers. We investigate the effects of path length, switch size, and interference length (the expected number of hops shared by two sessions which share at least one hop) on blocking probability and the ability of wavelength changers to improve performance. Our model correctly predicts unobvious qualitative behavior demonstrated in simulations by other authors.

558 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Pierre A. Humblet1, Murat Azizoglu1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The problem of evaluating the performances of communication systems with optical amplifiers and a wideband optical filter is addressed. Exact probability of error expressions for optical signals in presence of amplifier spontaneous noise and photodetector shot noise are given and compared with those predicted by Gaussian approximations for amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK), or differential phase shift keying (DPSK) modulations, both for ideal photodetectors and for the case where shot noise is significant. >

514 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2005

9,031 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results show that, even though the interuser channel is noisy, cooperation leads not only to an increase in capacity for both users but also to a more robust system, where users' achievable rates are less susceptible to channel variations.
Abstract: Mobile users' data rate and quality of service are limited by the fact that, within the duration of any given call, they experience severe variations in signal attenuation, thereby necessitating the use of some type of diversity. In this two-part paper, we propose a new form of spatial diversity, in which diversity gains are achieved via the cooperation of mobile users. Part I describes the user cooperation strategy, while Part II (see ibid., p.1939-48) focuses on implementation issues and performance analysis. Results show that, even though the interuser channel is noisy, cooperation leads not only to an increase in capacity for both users but also to a more robust system, where users' achievable rates are less susceptible to channel variations.

6,572 citations


Book
Sean P. Meyn1, Richard L. Tweedie2Institutions (2)
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: This second edition reflects the same discipline and style that marked out the original and helped it to become a classic: proofs are rigorous and concise, the range of applications is broad and knowledgeable, and key ideas are accessible to practitioners with limited mathematical background.
Abstract: Meyn & Tweedie is back! The bible on Markov chains in general state spaces has been brought up to date to reflect developments in the field since 1996 - many of them sparked by publication of the first edition. The pursuit of more efficient simulation algorithms for complex Markovian models, or algorithms for computation of optimal policies for controlled Markov models, has opened new directions for research on Markov chains. As a result, new applications have emerged across a wide range of topics including optimisation, statistics, and economics. New commentary and an epilogue by Sean Meyn summarise recent developments and references have been fully updated. This second edition reflects the same discipline and style that marked out the original and helped it to become a classic: proofs are rigorous and concise, the range of applications is broad and knowledgeable, and key ideas are accessible to practitioners with limited mathematical background.

5,655 citations


Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: This book familiarizes readers with important problems, algorithms, and impossibility results in the area, and teaches readers how to reason carefully about distributed algorithms-to model them formally, devise precise specifications for their required behavior, prove their correctness, and evaluate their performance with realistic measures.
Abstract: In Distributed Algorithms, Nancy Lynch provides a blueprint for designing, implementing, and analyzing distributed algorithms. She directs her book at a wide audience, including students, programmers, system designers, and researchers. Distributed Algorithms contains the most significant algorithms and impossibility results in the area, all in a simple automata-theoretic setting. The algorithms are proved correct, and their complexity is analyzed according to precisely defined complexity measures. The problems covered include resource allocation, communication, consensus among distributed processes, data consistency, deadlock detection, leader election, global snapshots, and many others. The material is organized according to the system model-first by the timing model and then by the interprocess communication mechanism. The material on system models is isolated in separate chapters for easy reference. The presentation is completely rigorous, yet is intuitive enough for immediate comprehension. This book familiarizes readers with important problems, algorithms, and impossibility results in the area: readers can then recognize the problems when they arise in practice, apply the algorithms to solve them, and use the impossibility results to determine whether problems are unsolvable. The book also provides readers with the basic mathematical tools for designing new algorithms and proving new impossibility results. In addition, it teaches readers how to reason carefully about distributed algorithms-to model them formally, devise precise specifications for their required behavior, prove their correctness, and evaluate their performance with realistic measures. Table of Contents 1 Introduction 2 Modelling I; Synchronous Network Model 3 Leader Election in a Synchronous Ring 4 Algorithms in General Synchronous Networks 5 Distributed Consensus with Link Failures 6 Distributed Consensus with Process Failures 7 More Consensus Problems 8 Modelling II: Asynchronous System Model 9 Modelling III: Asynchronous Shared Memory Model 10 Mutual Exclusion 11 Resource Allocation 12 Consensus 13 Atomic Objects 14 Modelling IV: Asynchronous Network Model 15 Basic Asynchronous Network Algorithms 16 Synchronizers 17 Shared Memory versus Networks 18 Logical Time 19 Global Snapshots and Stable Properties 20 Network Resource Allocation 21 Asynchronous Networks with Process Failures 22 Data Link Protocols 23 Partially Synchronous System Models 24 Mutual Exclusion with Partial Synchrony 25 Consensus with Partial Synchrony

4,335 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Pramod Viswanath1, David Tse2, Rajiv LaroiaInstitutions (2)
01 Jun 2002
TL;DR: This work shows that true beamforming gains can be achieved when there are sufficient users, even though very limited channel feedback is needed, and proposes the use of multiple transmit antennas to induce large and fast channel fluctuations so that multiuser diversity can still be exploited.
Abstract: Multiuser diversity is a form of diversity inherent in a wireless network, provided by independent time-varying channels across the different users. The diversity benefit is exploited by tracking the channel fluctuations of the users and scheduling transmissions to users when their instantaneous channel quality is near the peak. The diversity gain increases with the dynamic range of the fluctuations and is thus limited in environments with little scattering and/or slow fading. In such environments, we propose the use of multiple transmit antennas to induce large and fast channel fluctuations so that multiuser diversity can still be exploited. The scheme can be interpreted as opportunistic beamforming and we show that true beamforming gains can be achieved when there are sufficient users, even though very limited channel feedback is needed. Furthermore, in a cellular system, the scheme plays an additional role of opportunistic nulling of the interference created on users of adjacent cells. We discuss the design implications of implementing. this scheme in a complete wireless system.

3,015 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 29

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20161
20022
20011
20002
19981
19972