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Pierre Filion

Bio: Pierre Filion is an academic researcher from University of Waterloo. The author has contributed to research in topics: Metropolitan area & Urban planning. The author has an hindex of 27, co-authored 89 publications receiving 2042 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a survey of planners (both practitioners and academics) and other urban professionals has sought to identify small metropolitan regions considered to have successful downtowns and the factors associated with this success, concluding that revitalization policies should concentrate on niche markets that show little interest in homogenized suburban activities.
Abstract: In the face of increasing suburbanization during the past half century, most downtowns have experienced decline, particularly those of small metropolitan regions. A survey of planners (both practitioners and academics) and other urban professionals has sought to identify small metropolitan regions considered to have successful downtowns and the factors associated with this success. Only a small number of such North American metropolitan regions were perceived as possessing a very successful or successful downtown. Factors that characterize such success are described. We conclude that revitalization policies should concentrate on niche markets that show little interest in homogenized suburban activities. More specifically, planners should focus on the retention and enhancement of the distinct physical characteristics that clearly distinguish downtowns from suburban environments. More and more U.S. cities and towns are coming to realize the benefits of greater street connectivity: reduced traffic o...

129 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the spatial distribution of households that pay excessive amounts of their income for rent in order to identify locations within metropolitan regions where housing affordability stress is greatest was analyzed and found that significant unevenness characterises the spatial distributions of housing affordability problems in major Canadian census metropolitan areas.
Abstract: Housing in‐affordability is a growing problem within Canadian urban areas. This research asks an as‐yet unanswered spatial question: where do those suffering high rates of housing affordability stress reside and what do the spatial patterns imply about policies intended to address this housing problem? This paper tabulates and maps the spatial distribution of households that pay excessive amounts of their income for rent in order to identify locations within metropolitan regions where housing affordability stress is greatest. It is found that significant unevenness characterises the spatial distribution of housing affordability problems in major Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs). Only a minority of places conform to the North American stereotype that concentrates this problem near the city centre. Where some CMAs have concentrations of the problem in the inner city or, alternatively inner suburb, other metropolitan areas exhibit a more diffuse pattern of housing in‐affordability. The locus of the ...

122 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors portray three aspects of urban dispersion: urban structure, residents' location and land-use preferences, and social ecology, and explain the dynamic inherent in this form of urbanisation.
Abstract: The paper portrays three aspects of urban dispersion: urban structure, residents' location and land-use preferences, and social ecology. To explain the dynamic inherent in this form of urbanisation...

112 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors narrate policies that attempted, since the late 1950s, a juxtaposition of high residential density and quality public transit services in the Toronto metropolitan region, highlighting the difficulties of pursuing such policies due to the power of neighbourhood-based interests, disagreement among jurisdictions within the metropolitan region and changes in priorities and intervention capacity.
Abstract: A supportive distribution of residential density is perceived to be an essential component of strategies aimed at increasing the use of public transit. To alter substantially land use-transport dynamics in a fashion that favours public transit patronage, residential density policies must be deployed over long periods and unfold at local and metropolitan levels simultaneously. The article narrates policies that attempted, since the late 1950s, a juxtaposition of high residential density and quality public transit services in the Toronto metropolitan region. Findings highlight the difficulties of pursuing such policies due to the power of neighbourhood-based interests, disagreement among jurisdictions within the metropolitan region and changes in priorities and intervention capacity. The article ends with proposals that seek to enhance the possibility of transforming the structure and dynamics of cities in ways that are compatible with smart growth principles.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated three suburban mixed-use centres in the Greater Toronto Area, selected for their advanced level of development, and identified the planning rationales and objectives that have led to their creation.
Abstract: In a context of growing car dependency and suburban sprawl, planners search for ways of intensifying urban development and reducing reliance on the automobile. The creation of planned mixed-use centres intended to become hubs of transit and pedestrian movement within the dispersed suburban environment represents one such intensification strategy. The author investigates three suburban mixed-use centres in the Greater Toronto Area, selected for their advanced level of development, and identifies the planning rationales and objectives that have led to their creation. To verify the extent to which they meet their intensification goal, he monitors the three selected centres' level of development, modal split, land-use pattern, inner synergy, and inner movements. Findings are mixed. If the suburban centres have been successful in attracting development and attaining levels of transit use, pedestrian movement and inner synergy exceeding those of the typical suburban area, they are not as distinct from the remainder of the suburb as intended and thus fall short from their planning objectives. The author concludes that a strategy combining the creation of nodes (such as suburban mixed-use centres) with high-density, transit-oriented corridors within the suburban environment would be more effective in bringing intensification to this portion of the metropolitan region. (A)

85 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The the practice of everyday life is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading the practice of everyday life. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look hundreds times for their chosen novels like this the practice of everyday life, but end up in harmful downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some malicious bugs inside their desktop computer. the practice of everyday life is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection spans in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Kindly say, the the practice of everyday life is universally compatible with any devices to read.

2,932 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role and ethics of planners acting as sources of misinformation are considered, and a practical and politically sensitive form of progressive planning practice is defined. But the authors do not discuss the role of planners in this process.
Abstract: Abstract Information is a source of power in the planning process. This article begins by assessing five perspectives of the planner's use of information: those of the technician, the incremental pragmatist, the liberal advocate, the structuralist, and the “progressive.” Then several types of misinformation (inevitable or unnecessary, ad hoc or systematic) are distinguished in a reformulation of bounded rationality in planning, and practical responses by planning staff are identified. The role and ethics of planners acting as sources of misinformation are considered. In practice planners work in the face of power manifest as the social and political (mis)-man-agement of citizens' knowledge, consent, trust, and attention. Seeking to enable planners to anticipate and counteract sources of misinformation threatening public serving, democratic planning processes, the article clarifies a practical and politically sensitive form of “progressive” planning practice.

1,961 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1984-Antipode

1,455 citations