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Pieter Lagrou

Bio: Pieter Lagrou is an academic researcher from Centre national de la recherche scientifique. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nazism & Deportation. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 127 citations.
Topics: Nazism, Deportation, Genocide, Total war, Victory

Papers
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Book
13 Feb 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, the post-war treatment of resistance veterans is discussed, and the legacy of forced economic migration is discussed. But the focus is on the deportation of labour conscripts.
Abstract: List of illustrations Acknowledgements List of abbreviations Introduction Part I. Troublesome Heroes: The Post-War Treatment of Resistance Veterans: 1. Approaching victory and re-establishing the state 2. Heroes of a nation: Belgium and France 3. A nation of heroes: the Netherlands Part II. Repatriating Displaced Populations from Germany: 4. Displaced populations 5. The challenge to the post-war state: Belgium and the Netherlands 6. Petain's exiles and De Gaulle's deportees Part III. The Legacy of Forced Economic Migration: 7. Labour and total war 8. Moral panic: 'the soap, the suit and above all the Bible' 9. Patriotic scrutiny 10. 'Deportation': the defence of the labour conscripts Part IV. Martyrs and Other Victims of Nazi Persecution 11. Plural persecutions 12. National martyrdom 13. Patriotic memories and the genocide 14. Remembering the war and legitimising the post-war international order Conclusion Bibliography Index.

115 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The American Historical Review, Volume 128, Issue 2, June 2023, Pages 1031-1032, https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/rhad162 as mentioned in this paper .
Abstract: Journal Article Philip G. Nord. After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France. Get access Philip G. Nord. After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2020. Pp. xiii, 472. Cloth $39.99. Pieter Lagrou Pieter Lagrou Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium Email: Pieter.Lagrou@ulb.ac.be https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6119-5361 Search for other works by this author on: Oxford Academic Google Scholar The American Historical Review, Volume 128, Issue 2, June 2023, Pages 1031–1032, https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/rhad162 Published: 22 June 2023

Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Feb 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors use the language of J.L. Austin and add to his repertoire the category of performative non-speech acts, which are always present in commemorative practices, and in most other narrative forms as well.
Abstract: This chapter aims to offer some reflections on silence and its essential place in the constellation of remembering and forgetting. Here is a subject embedded in the very centre of the avalanche of literature produced in recent years in this field, but with some notable exceptions, it has not been approached systematically. I want to try to do so by using the language of J.L. Austin, and adding to his repertoire the category of performative non-speech acts, which I believe are always present in commemorative practices, and in most other narrative forms as well. Silence is the hidden partner in our work as scholars of our violent times, and my intention is to invite silence into our discussions of aftermaths, since whether we admit it or not, silence defines the way we live our lives.

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Memory occupies a vital place at the heart of justice and its struggle to keep the victims, crimes, and perpetrators among the unforgotten as discussed by the authors, and this memory-justice at once informs core judicial practices and ranges beyond them in a manner that leaves judicial closure incomplete.
Abstract: Justice is, in part, a form of remembrance: Memory occupies a vital place at the heart of justice and its struggle to keep the victims, crimes, and perpetrators among the unforgotten. I argue that this memory-justice at once informs core judicial practices and ranges beyond them in a manner that leaves judicial closure incomplete. It reminds us of a duty to keep crimes and their victims from the oblivion of forgetting, of a duty to restore, preserve, and acknowledge the just order of the world. Yet, in the shadow of remembrance, other human goods can wither, goods located in the temporal registers of present and future. This latter lesson is important, but it is one with which we are familiar. I emphasize another, with which we are perhaps less at home: the intimacy of memory's bond with justice, not as obsessional or as a syndrome, but as a face of justice itself.

78 citations

Book
24 Mar 2016
TL;DR: In this article, a pioneering comparative history of European decolonization from the formal ending of empires to the post-colonial European present is presented, where the authors chart the long-term development of post-war decolonisation processes as well as the histories of inward and return migration from former empires which followed.
Abstract: Europe after Empire is a pioneering comparative history of European decolonization from the formal ending of empires to the postcolonial European present. Elizabeth Buettner charts the long-term development of post-war decolonization processes as well as the histories of inward and return migration from former empires which followed. She shows that not only were former colonies remade as a result of the path to decolonization: so too was Western Europe, with imperial traces scattered throughout popular and elite cultures, consumer goods, religious life, political formations, and ideological terrains. People were also inwardly mobile, including not simply Europeans returning 'home' but Asians, Africans, West Indians, and others who made their way to Europe to forge new lives. The result is a Europe fundamentally transformed by multicultural diversity and cultural hybridity and by the destabilization of assumptions about race, culture, and the meanings of place, and where imperial legacies and memories live on.

75 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is no doubt that the April events concerning the Bronze Soldier will become a benchmark in the contemporary history of the state of Estonia as mentioned in this paper, the bifurcation point, the point of division.
Abstract: There is no doubt that the April events concerning the Bronze Soldier will become a benchmark in the contemporary history of the state of Estonia. It is the bifurcation point, the point of division...

68 citations

Dissertation
28 Aug 2018
TL;DR: This paper examined how the Hitler Youth generation represented their pasts in memoirs written in West Germany, post-unification Germany, and North America, and argued for a more nuanced reading of Nazi-related memoirs and made the case that public memory is not necessarily reflected on a personal level.
Abstract: This thesis examines how the Hitler Youth generation represented their pasts in memoirs written in West Germany, post-unification Germany, and North America. Its aim is two-fold: to scrutinise the under-examined source base of memoirs and to demonstrate how representations of childhood, adolescence and maturation are integral to reconstructing memory of the Nazi past. It introduces the term ‘collected memoryscape’ to encapsulate the more nebulous multi-dimensional collective memory. Historical and literary theories nuance the reading of autobiography and memoirs as ego-documents, forming a new methodological basis for historians to consider. The Hitler Youth generation is defined as those individuals born between 1925 and 1933 in Germany, who spent the majority of their formative years under Nazi educational and cultural polices. The study compares published and unpublished memoirs, along with German and English-language memoirs, to examine constructions of personal and historical events. Some traumas, such as rapes, have only just resurfaced publicly - despite their inclusion in private memoirs since the 1940s. On a public level, West Germans underwent Vergangenheitsbewaltigung (coming to terms with the past), these memoirs illustrate that, in the post-war period, private and generational memory reinterpretation continued in multitudinous ways. For example, even after the 1995 German Wehrmacht exhibitions, cohort members continued to express a fondness for the Waffen-SS or Wehrmacht in their writings. This thesis dialogically juxtaposes public and personal memory, also exploring how individuals experienced and represented controversial memories of Nazism. Overall, the cohort members employed three main narration methods: they normalised their childhood experiences; they silenced uncomfortable aspects of their past; and they cast themselves as victims as a coping mechanism, in order to achieve closure. This thesis argues for a more nuanced reading of Nazi-related memoirs and makes the case that public memory is not necessarily reflected on a personal level.

66 citations