scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Po-Jung Pan

Bio: Po-Jung Pan is an academic researcher from Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Gerontology. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 75 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: ESWT is more effective in the treatment of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder than is TENS therapy, especially for arc-type calcific plaque.

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the effect of physical fitness on falls and other fitness-related factors remains poorly understood, however, the results of all of the assessments indicated that the participants who had fallen three times exhibited lower levels of overall physical fitness than did those who had not fallen in the previous year.
Abstract: As the community-dwelling population ages in Taiwan, concerns regarding long-term care have grown more urgent. Physical fitness plays a key role in enabling community-dwelling older adults to independently complete daily tasks and avoid falling accidents. However, the effect of physical fitness on falls and other fitness-related factors remains poorly understood.In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 2130 community-dwelling older adults were recruited from a rural region of Taiwan. Each of these participants completed a demographics interview and frailty questionnaire and reported their history of falls. We evaluated each participant's height and body weight measurements, calf circumference, bone mass density, and results on the grip strength, single-leg standing, chair sit-and-reach, 8-ft up-and-go, 30-second chair stand, 2-minute step, 30-second arm curl, 6-m walk, and back scratch tests to determine their overall physical fitness, which consisted of their body composition, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and cardiopulmonary fitness.The prevalence of falls in the preceding year among the older adults surveyed was 20.8%, and the resultant hospitalization rate was 10.9%. The older adults who were more physically active in the past week, had regular exercise habits, lived with family, and had no history of hospitalization due to falls, exhibited greater performance on the physical fitness tests. Three time fallers exhibited lower levels of overall physical fitness than did those who had not fallen. The nonfallers outperformed the fallers in grip strength (participants who had not fallen and those who had fallen once, twice, or three times in the preceding year: 24.66 ± 0.19 vs. 23.66 ± 0.35 vs. 20.62 ± 0.71 vs. 22.20 ± 0.90 kg) and single-leg standing duration (19.38 ± 0.39 vs. 16.33 ± 0.78 vs. 13.95 ± 1.67 vs. 12.34 ± 1.82 seconds).Exercise habits, living status, hospitalization due to falls, and amount of exercise were all associated with physical fitness in community-dwelling older adults. The results of all of the assessments indicated that the participants who had fallen three times exhibited lower levels of physical fitness than did those who had not fallen in the previous year. Physical measurements, including grip strength and single-leg standing duration, are associated with an individual's risk of falling, which indicates that they should be considered in the development of geriatric physical fitness and fall-prevention programs.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study used the comet assay, cell cycle analysis, immunofluorescence staining, the TUNEL assay, and Western blotting to identify the anti-HCC role of glycyrrhizic acid.
Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequently occurring liver malignancy in Asia. Glycyrrhizic acid is known to reduce the risk of HCC formation in patients with chronic hepatitis C. To identify whether glycyrrhizic acid may play a role in anti-HCC therapy as an adjuvant is important. However, the inhibitory effect of glycyrrhizic acid on cell cycle progression in HCC cells and the mechanism of such have not been fully elucidated. This study used the comet assay, cell cycle analysis, immunofluorescence staining, the TUNEL assay, and Western blotting to identify the anti-HCC role of glycyrrhizic acid. Glycyrrhizic acid may induce DNA damage, apoptosis, activation of ATM, and expression of p21, and p27 in HCC cells. In addition, glycyrrhizic acid may also induce G1 phase arrest and suppress NF-κB-mediated Cyclin D1 expression. DNA damage and NF-κB inactivation may be associated with glycyrrhizic acid-induced G1 phase arrest in HCC cells.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors assessed the physical fitness levels of active community-dwelling older adults and investigated the correlation of their (stratified by age and sex) fitness levels with handgrip strength.
Abstract: Abstract In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the physical fitness levels of active community-dwelling older adults. Moreover, we investigated the correlation of their (stratified by age and sex) fitness levels with handgrip strength (HGS). Comprehensive physical fitness tests, including sarcopenia screening, were conducted with a total of 2,130 older adults residing in a rural area of Taiwan. The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of age- and sex-specific physical fitness levels were determined. Furthermore, we identified the key parameters for assessing the physical fitness of older adults and performed stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Both men and women exhibited age-related decreases in all aspects of functional fitness, a trend indicating that older adults in Taiwan may lose their independence in the future. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed that HGS was positively correlated with sex, body mass index, and the results of 30-s arm curl and back scratch tests but negatively correlated with age and the result of 8-foot up-and-go test. Our reference values for physical fitness may help assess the fitness levels of active community-dwelling older adults and design community-based health programs to prevent the early loss of independence in community-dwelling older adults in Taiwan.

2 citations

01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: Electromyographic as sess ment dem on strates its con tri bu tion in pre dic tion of func tional out come in spina bifida and the innervations of hip adductor and quadriceps were found to cor re late with walk ing abil ity.
Abstract: Back ground. It is con tro ver sial to pre dict am bu la tion po ten tial us ing neu ro log i cal level or spe cific pat tern of mus cle strength in pa tients with spina bifida. We at tempted to an a lyze the re la tion ship be tween the mo bil ity out come and its in flu enc ing fac tors uti liz ing electro myography to study mo tor unit ac tiv ity in lower limbs. A sub sid iary aim was to eval u ate the ex ter nal anal sphincter with electromyography and to de ter mine the rel e vant fac tors of bowel and blad der func tions. Methods. Among 156 pa tients with spina bifida who had re ceived electromyographic ex am i na tion and were fol lowed at the out-patient clinic be tween 1998 and 2000, func tional as sess ment with Pe di at ric Eval u a tion of Dis abil ity In ven tory (PEDI) was ap plied in 47 ran domly se lected pa tients. Other as sess ments in cluded clin i cal neu ro log i cal ex am i na tion, bowel and blad der func tion sur vey, and am bu la tion eval u a tion. We cor re lated the pa ram e ters of electromyography with the am bu la tory abil ity and PEDI scores. The innervation of ex ter nal sphincter was com pared be tween groups with or with out neurogenic bowel or blad der dys func tion. Re sults. The innervations of hip adductor and quadriceps were found to cor re late with walk ing abil ity (p < 0.01); above mus cles as well as an te rior tibialis, and gas troc ne mius were re lated to PEDI scores (p < 0.01). The neu ro log i cal level still man i fested cor re la tion with walk ing abil ity (p < 0.05) and PEDI scores (p < 0.01). Both denervation po ten tials and re cruit ment pat tern were im por tant pa ram e ters for am bu la tion and mo bil ity pre dic tion. Sig nif i cant dif fer ence was ob tained in de nervation patentials of sphincter within bowel groups (p = 0.036) and blad der groups (p = 0.016). Con clu sions. Both tra di tional neu ro log i cal level and spe cific mus cle innervation ex ert cru cial in flu ence on walk ing and mo bil ity func tions. Electromyographic as sess ment dem on strates its con tri bu tion in pre dic tion of func tional out come in spina bifida. [Chin Med J (Tai pei) 2001;64:509-515]

1 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the best treatment options for tendinopathy, and evaluated the effectiveness of NSAIDS, corticosteroid injections, exercise-based physical therapy, physical therapy modalities, shock wave therapy, sclerotherapy, nitric oxide patches, surgery, growth factors and stem cell treatment.
Abstract: Tendinopathy is a broad term encompassing painful conditions occurring in and around tendons in response to overuse. Recent basic science research suggests little or no inflammation is present in these conditions. Thus, traditional treatment modalities aimed at controlling inflammation such as corticosteroid injections and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications (NSAIDS) may not be the most effective options. We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the best treatment options for tendinopathy. We evaluated the effectiveness of NSAIDS, corticosteroid injections, exercise-based physical therapy, physical therapy modalities, shock wave therapy, sclerotherapy, nitric oxide patches, surgery, growth factors, and stem cell treatment. NSAIDS and corticosteroids appear to provide pain relief in the short term, but their effectiveness in the long term has not been demonstrated. We identified inconsistent results with shock wave therapy and physical therapy modalities such as ultrasound, iontophoresis and low-level laser therapy. Current data support the use of eccentric strengthening protocols, sclerotherapy, and nitric oxide patches, but larger, multicenter trials are needed to confirm the early results with these treatments. Preliminary work with growth factors and stem cells is promising, but further study is required in these fields. Surgery remains the last option due to the morbidity and inconsistent outcomes. The ideal treatment for tendinopathy remains unclear. Level of Evidence: Level II, systematic review. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

376 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years.
Abstract: The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA) first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders.

374 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is no scientific evidence in favour of either radial ESWT or focused ESWT with respect to treatment outcome, and future randomized controlled trials should primarily address systematic tests of the aforementioned optimum treatment protocol.
Abstract: Background Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is an effective and safe non-invasive treatment option for tendon and other pathologies of the musculoskeletal system.

156 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that the use of RSWT for the management of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is safe and effective, leading to a significant reduction in pain and improvement of shoulder function after 4 weeks, without adverse effects.
Abstract: Background and Purpose. Radial shock-wave therapy (RSWT) is a pneumatically generated, low- to medium-energy type of shock-wave therapy. This single-blind, randomized, “less active similar therapy”-controlled study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of RSWT for the management of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects. Ninety patients with radiographically verified calcific tendinitis of the shoulder were tested. Methods. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (n=45) or a control group (n=45). Pain and functional level were evaluated before and after treatment and at a 6-month follow-up. Radiographic modifications in calcifications were evaluated before and after treatment. Results. The treatment group displayed improvement in all of the parameters analyzed after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. Calcifications disappeared completely in 86.6% of the subjects in the treatment group and partially in 13.4% of subjects; only 8.8% of the subjects in the control group displayed partially reduced calcifications, and none displayed a total disappearance. Discussion and Conclusion. The results suggest that the use of RSWT for the management of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is safe and effective, leading to a significant reduction in pain and improvement of shoulder function after 4 weeks, without adverse effects.

147 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has consistently been more effective with patient feedback, which enables directing the shock waves to the most painful area (clinical focusing), rather than with anatomic or image-guided focusing, which are used to direct the shock wave to an anatomic landmark or structure.
Abstract: Many clinical trials have evaluated the use of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for treating patients with chronic tendinosis of the supraspinatus, lateral epicondylitis, and plantar fasciitis. Although extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been reported to be effective in some trials, in others it was no more effective than placebo. The multiple variables associated with this therapy, such as the amount of energy delivered, the method of focusing the shock waves, frequency and timing of delivery, and whether or not anesthetics are used, makes comparing clinical trials difficult. Calcific tendinosis of the supraspinatus and plantar fasciitis have been successfully managed with extracorporeal shock wave therapy when nonsurgical management has failed. Results have been mixed in the management of lateral epicondylitis, however, and this therapy has not been effective in managing noncalcific tendinosis of the supraspinatus. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has consistently been more effective with patient feedback, which enables directing the shock waves to the most painful area (clinical focusing), rather than with anatomic or image-guided focusing, which are used to direct the shock wave to an anatomic landmark or structure.

107 citations