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Pralay Majumder

Bio: Pralay Majumder is an academic researcher from Bose Institute. The author has contributed to research in topics: Mannose binding & Lipaphis erysimi. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 14 publications receiving 839 citations. Previous affiliations of Pralay Majumder include Presidency University, Kolkata & Wayne State University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
11 Jan 2006-Planta
TL;DR: ASAL promises to be a potential component in insect resistance rice breeding programme and is detected on chromosomes of transformed plants using PRINS and C-PRINS techniques.
Abstract: Mannose binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) has been shown to be antifeedant and insecticidal against sap-sucking insects. In the present investigation, ASAL coding sequence was expressed under the control of CaMV35S promoter in a chimeric gene cassette containing plant selection marker, hpt and gusA reporter gene of pCAMBIA1301 binary vector in an elite indica rice cv. IR64. Many fertile transgenic plants were generated using scutellar calli as initial explants through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology. GUS activity was observed in selected calli and in mature plants. Transformation frequency was calculated to be ~12.1%±0.351 (mean ± SE). Southern blot analyses revealed the integration of ASAL gene into rice genome with a predominant single copy insertion. Transgene localization was detected on chromosomes of transformed plants using PRINS and C-PRINS techniques. Northern and western blot analyses determined the expression of transgene in transformed lines. ELISA analyses estimated ASAL expression up to 0.72 and 0.67% of total soluble protein in T0 and T1 plants, respectively. Survival and fecundity of brown planthopper and green leafhopper were reduced to 36% (P<0.01), 32% (P<0.05) and 40.5, 29.5% (P<0.001), respectively, when tested on selected plants in comparison to control plants. Specific binding of expressed ASAL to receptor proteins of insect gut was analysed. Analysis of T1 progenies confirmed the inheritance of the transgenes. Thus, ASAL promises to be a potential component in insect resistance rice breeding programme.

132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Indrajit Dutta1, Pralay Majumder1, Prasenjit Saha1, Krishna Ray1, Sampa Das1 
TL;DR: This is the first report showing sustainable resistance in transgenic B. juncea with ASAL gene with stable integration and inheritance against the target pest, mustard aphid.

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The expression of the ASAL coding sequence under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology opens up the possibility of expressing the novel ASAL gene in a wide range of crop plants susceptible to various sap-sucking insects.
Abstract: Summary The homopteran group of polyphagous sucking insect pests causes severe damage to many economically important plants including tobacco Allium sativum leaf lectin (ASAL), a mannose-binding 25-kDa homodimeric protein, has recently been found to be antagonistic to various sucking insects in the homopteran group through artificial diet bioassay experiments The present study describes, for the first time, the expression of the ASAL coding sequence under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology Molecular analyses demonstrated the integration of the chimeric ASAL gene in tobacco and its inheritance in the progeny plants Western blot analysis followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) determined the level of ASAL expression in different lines to be in the range of approximately 068%−2% of total soluble plant protein An in planta bioassay conducted with Myzus persicae, peach potato aphid (a devastating pest of tobacco and many other important plants), revealed that the percentage of insect survival decreased significantly to 16%−20% in T0 plants and T1 progeny, whilst approximately 75% of insects survived on untransformed tobacco plants after 144 h of incubation Ligand analyses of insect brush border membrane vesicle receptors and expressed ASAL in transgenic tobacco showed that the expressed ASAL binds to the aphid gut receptor in the same manner as native ASAL, pointing to the fact that ASAL maintains the biochemical characteristics even in the transgenic situation These findings in a model plant open up the possibility of expressing the novel ASAL gene in a wide range of crop plants susceptible to various sap-sucking insects

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The data suggest that dasatinib mediates its action in part through EGFR signaling and could be a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that Myo-II regulates two essential features of border cell migration: initial detachment of the border cell cluster from the follicular epithelium and the dynamics of cellular protrusions, and that the cell polarity protein Par-1 (MARK), a serine-threonine kinase, regulates the localization and activation of Myosin-II in border cells.

72 citations


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TL;DR: By understanding the mechanisms of induced resistance, this work can predict the herbivores that are likely to be affected by induced responses and could be exploited as an important tool for the pest management to minimize the amounts of insecticides used for pest control.
Abstract: Plants respond to herbivory through various morphological, biochemicals, and molecular mechanisms to counter/offset the effects of herbivore attack. The biochemical mechanisms of defense against the herbivores are wide-ranging, highly dynamic, and are mediated both by direct and indirect defenses. The defensive compounds are either produced constitutively or in response to plant damage, and affect feeding, growth, and survival of herbivores. In addition, plants also release volatile organic compounds that attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. These strategies either act independently or in conjunction with each other. However, our understanding of these defensive mechanisms is still limited. Induced resistance could be exploited as an important tool for the pest management to minimize the amounts of insecticides used for pest control. Host plant resistance to insects, particularly, induced resistance, can also be manipulated with the use of chemical elicitors of secondary metabolites, which confer resistance to insects. By understanding the mechanisms of induced resistance, we can predict the herbivores that are likely to be affected by induced responses. The elicitors of induced responses can be sprayed on crop plants to build up the natural defense system against damage caused by herbivores. The induced responses can also be engineered genetically, so that the defensive compounds are constitutively produced in plants against are challenged by the herbivory. Induced resistance can be exploited for developing crop cultivars, which readily produce the inducible response upon mild infestation, and can act as one of components of integrated pest management for sustainable crop production.

1,296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Progress made in research on vector interactions of the more than 200 plant viruses that are transmitted by hemipteroid insects beginning a few hours or days after acquisition and for up to the life of the insect, i.e., in a persistent-circulative or persistent-propagative mode.
Abstract: The majority of described plant viruses are transmitted by insects of the Hemipteroid assemblage that includes aphids, whiteflies, leafhoppers, planthoppers, and thrips. In this review we highlight progress made in research on vector interactions of the more than 200 plant viruses that are transmitted by hemipteroid insects beginning a few hours or days after acquisition and for up to the life of the insect, i.e., in a persistentcirculative or persistent-propagative mode. These plant viruses move through the insect vector, from the gut lumen into the hemolymph or other tissues and finally into the salivary glands, from which these viruses are introduced back into the plant host during insect feeding. The movement and/or replication of the viruses in the insect vectors require specific interactions between virus and vector components. Recent investigations have resulted in a better understanding of the replication sites and tissue tropism of several plant viruses that propagate in insect vectors. Furthermore, virus and insect proteins involved in overcoming transmission barriers in the vector have been identified for some virus-vector combinations.

892 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This Review examines how cells use both classical and novel mechanisms of locomotion as they traverse challenging 3D matrices and cellular environments and draws comparisons between 1D, 2D and 3D migration.
Abstract: Cell migration is essential for physiological processes as diverse as development, immune defence and wound healing. It is also a hallmark of cancer malignancy. Thousands of publications have elucidated detailed molecular and biophysical mechanisms of cultured cells migrating on flat, 2D substrates of glass and plastic. However, much less is known about how cells successfully navigate the complex 3D environments of living tissues. In these more complex, native environments, cells use multiple modes of migration, including mesenchymal, amoeboid, lobopodial and collective, and these are governed by the local extracellular microenvironment, specific modalities of Rho GTPase signalling and non-muscle myosin contractility. Migration through 3D environments is challenging because it requires the cell to squeeze through complex or dense extracellular structures. Doing so requires specific cellular adaptations to mechanical features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or its remodelling. In addition, besides navigating through diverse ECM environments and overcoming extracellular barriers, cells often interact with neighbouring cells and tissues through physical and signalling interactions. Accordingly, cells need to call on an impressively wide diversity of mechanisms to meet these challenges. This Review examines how cells use both classical and novel mechanisms of locomotion as they traverse challenging 3D matrices and cellular environments. It focuses on principles rather than details of migratory mechanisms and draws comparisons between 1D, 2D and 3D migration.

487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Extensive qualitative and quantitative high throughput analyses of temporal and spatial variations in gene expression, protein level and activity, and metabolite concentration will accelerate not only the understanding of the overall mechanisms of direct defense, but also accelerate the identification of specific targets for enhancement of plant resistance for agriculture.
Abstract: Plants respond to insect herbivory with responses broadly known as direct defenses, indirect defenses, and tolerance. Direct defenses include all plant traits that affect susceptibility of host plants by themselves. Overall categories of direct plant defenses against insect herbivores include limiting food supply, reducing nutrient value, reducing preference, disrupting physical structures, and inhibiting chemical pathways of the attacking insect. Major known defense chemicals include plant secondary metabolites, protein inhibitors of insect digestive enzymes, proteases, lectins, amino acid deaminases and oxidases. Multiple factors with additive or even synergistic impact are usually involved in defense against a specific insect species, and factors of major importance to one insect species may only be of secondary importance or not effective at all against another insect species. Extensive qualitative and quantitative high throughput analyses of temporal and spatial variations in gene expression, protein level and activity, and metabolite concentration will accelerate not only the understanding of the overall mechanisms of direct defense, but also accelerate the identification of specific targets for enhancement of plant resistance for agriculture.

384 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The same model systems that are used to explore direct molecular interactions between plants and aphids can be utilized to study the ecological context in which they occur.

374 citations