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Prem Vahsishtha

Bio: Prem Vahsishtha is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 19 citations.

Papers
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Posted Content

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TL;DR: The hypothesis that increases in the schooling of women enhance the human capital of the next generation and thus make a unique contribution to economic growth is assessed on the basis of data describing green revolution India as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The hypothesis that increases in the schooling of women enhance the human capital of the next generation and thus make a unique contribution to economic growth is assessed on the basis of data describing green revolution India. Estimates are obtained that indicate that a component of the significant and positive relationship between maternal literacy and child schooling in the Indian setting reflects the productivity effect of home teaching and that the existence of this effect, combined with the increase in returns to schooling for men, importantly underlies the expansion of female literary following the onset of the green revolution.

19 citations


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Dissertation

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01 Mar 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, Solveig DEO GLORIA is described as a "solicitation" and a "solution" to the problem of OPSOMMING.
Abstract: ............................................................................................................................................ ii SOLI DEO GLORIA ................................................................................................................................. ii OPSOMMING ......................................................................................................................................... v ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ...................................................................................................................... viii ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ......................................................................................................... xi DEDICATION ..........................................................................................................................................xiv TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................................. xv CHAPTER ONE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 BACKGROUND TO THE RESEARCH ........................................................................................................... 1 1.

44 citations

ReportDOI

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23 Nov 2022
TL;DR: The authors explored how parents in Rajasthan, India make choices about their daughters' schooling and marriage and found that parents' choices are partially driven by their beliefs about the likelihood of receiving high-quality marriage offers in the future and how this likelihood depends on a daughter's age and education.
Abstract: This paper explores how parents in Rajasthan, India make choices about their daughters’ schooling and marriage. We develop a dynamic model in which parents take schooling and marriage decisions under uncertainty about the quality of future marriage offers. Parents’ choices are thus partially driven by their beliefs about the likelihood of receiving high-quality marriage offers in the future and how this likelihood depends on a daughter’s age and education. We identify this model by creating a novel hypothetical-choice tool. We prove that by varying the information about future marriage offers described in hypothetical scenarios, our tool enables us to identify both preferences and probabilistic beliefs without directly eliciting probabilities. We find that parents believe there to be a large marriage-market return to girls’ education and that this drives much of their investment in their daughters’ schooling. And while parents would prefer to delay a daughters’ marriage until at least age 18, a belief that marriage-market prospects begin to deteriorate with age once a daughter is out of school creates an incentive for parents to accept early marriage offers. *Email addresses: alison a@ifs.org.uk and abi.adams@economics.ox.ac.uk. We thank Nava Ashraf, Orazio Attanasio, Oriana Bandiera, James Banks, Teodora Boneva, Rossella Calvi, Rachel Cassidy, Rachel Griffith, Seema Jayachandran, Willemien Kets, Sonya Krutikova, Hamish Low, Costas Meghir, Francisco Oteiza, Rohini Pande, Aureo de Paula, Imran Rasul, Gabriela Smarrelli, Anna Stansbury, Marcos Vera-Hernandez and Basit Zafar for helpful comments and feedback. We are enormously grateful to Abhishek Gautam, Hemlata Verma, Ronak Soni and Amit Kumar for invaluable support in developing and piloting this instrument and to Kuhika Seth for collecting insightful qualitative data. We would like to thank the Centre for Public Policy at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation and the John Fell Fund, University of Oxford for generous financial support.

6 citations

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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: This paper explored the dynamic interplay between parental wealth, parental schooling, government schooling initiatives and child schooling outcomes in rural Bangladesh and found that mother's schooling and to some extent father's schooling are important predictors of offspring attainment.
Abstract: This paper explores the dynamic interplay between parental wealth, parental schooling, government schooling initiatives and child schooling outcomes in rural Bangladesh. In doing so, I engage with the vast literature that suggests mother’s schooling is the most important predictor of offspring schooling attainment and empirically investigate whether this continues to be the case in the context of recent waves of school reform. Methodologically, I improve upon past estimates by using a gender-disaggregated measure of wealth that is exogenous to decision-making in marriage: men’s and women’s assets at marriage. I run a series of Cox semiproportional hazard models estimating factors that predict rates of school entry and duration between entry and exit, as well as OLS regression estimates of grade progression between entry and exit. Findings indicate that mother’s schooling, and to some extent father’s schooling, are important predictors of offspring attainment even after controlling for government schooling initiatives and improved measures of wealth. Substantively, I argue for a re-contextualization of the literature on household decision-making to better understand the nuanced interplay between household factors and external programs and incentives in the context of mass schooling reform in Bangladesh and around the globe.

6 citations

Posted Content

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors show that mechanization has led to a significantly greater decline in women's than men's labor in primary tilling on Indian farms and highlighted the gendered impact of technological change in contexts where there is a sex-specific specialization of labor.
Abstract: Technological change in production processes with gendered division of labor across tasks, such as agriculture, can have a differential impact on women's and men's labor. Using exogenous variation in the extent of loamy soil, which is more amenable to deep tillage than clayey soil and therefore more likely to see adoption of tractor driven equipment for primary tilling, we show that mechanization has led to significantly greater decline in women's than men's labor on Indian farms. Reduced demand for labor in weeding, a task that requires precision and is thus more often undertaken by women, explains our findings. The estimates suggest that increased mechanized tilling led to a more than 22% fall in women's agricultural labor in India during 1999-2011. Our results highlight the gendered impact of technological change in contexts where there is sex-specific specialization of labor.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors combine novel data and methodology to shed light on the contribution to dowry of a composite characteristic that they refer to a child quality, and they conclude that Dowry values are not determined by household characteristics alone: child quality is a very significant determinant of dowry.
Abstract: The authors combine novel data and methodology to shed light on the contribution to dowry of a composite characteristic that they refer to a child quality. Their findings can be summarized as follows: (1) Dowry values are not determined by household characteristics alone: child quality is a very significant determinant of dowry; (2) Quality is not a homogenous attribute for boys and girls: They distinguish them between “high-level” quality (which matters for boys) and “low-level” quality (which matters for girls); (3) High-level quality does not begin revealing itself until the child enters school, whereas low-level quality starts becoming apparent at an earlier stage; (4) An increase in quality in girls appears to increase their dowry values: they argue that this is consistent with the idea that girls marry up and that quality has a horizontal component; (5) For boys, quality gets partially absorbed into educational attainments, whereas for girls quality continues to matter because it does not get translated into educational investments.

5 citations