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Author

Qi Tian

Bio: Qi Tian is an academic researcher from Huawei. The author has contributed to research in topics: Image retrieval & Visual Word. The author has an hindex of 96, co-authored 1030 publications receiving 41010 citations. Previous affiliations of Qi Tian include Texas State University & Princeton University.


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Dec 2015
TL;DR: A minor contribution, inspired by recent advances in large-scale image search, an unsupervised Bag-of-Words descriptor is proposed that yields competitive accuracy on VIPeR, CUHK03, and Market-1501 datasets, and is scalable on the large- scale 500k dataset.
Abstract: This paper contributes a new high quality dataset for person re-identification, named "Market-1501". Generally, current datasets: 1) are limited in scale, 2) consist of hand-drawn bboxes, which are unavailable under realistic settings, 3) have only one ground truth and one query image for each identity (close environment). To tackle these problems, the proposed Market-1501 dataset is featured in three aspects. First, it contains over 32,000 annotated bboxes, plus a distractor set of over 500K images, making it the largest person re-id dataset to date. Second, images in Market-1501 dataset are produced using the Deformable Part Model (DPM) as pedestrian detector. Third, our dataset is collected in an open system, where each identity has multiple images under each camera. As a minor contribution, inspired by recent advances in large-scale image search, this paper proposes an unsupervised Bag-of-Words descriptor. We view person re-identification as a special task of image search. In experiment, we show that the proposed descriptor yields competitive accuracy on VIPeR, CUHK03, and Market-1501 datasets, and is scalable on the large-scale 500k dataset.

3,564 citations

Book ChapterDOI
08 Sep 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, a part-based convolutional baseline (PCB) is proposed to learn discriminative part-informed features for person retrieval and two contributions are made: (i) a network named Part-based Convolutional Baseline (PCBB) which outputs a convolutionAL descriptor consisting of several part-level features.
Abstract: Employing part-level features offers fine-grained information for pedestrian image description. A prerequisite of part discovery is that each part should be well located. Instead of using external resources like pose estimator, we consider content consistency within each part for precise part location. Specifically, we target at learning discriminative part-informed features for person retrieval and make two contributions. (i) A network named Part-based Convolutional Baseline (PCB). Given an image input, it outputs a convolutional descriptor consisting of several part-level features. With a uniform partition strategy, PCB achieves competitive results with the state-of-the-art methods, proving itself as a strong convolutional baseline for person retrieval. (ii) A refined part pooling (RPP) method. Uniform partition inevitably incurs outliers in each part, which are in fact more similar to other parts. RPP re-assigns these outliers to the parts they are closest to, resulting in refined parts with enhanced within-part consistency. Experiment confirms that RPP allows PCB to gain another round of performance boost. For instance, on the Market-1501 dataset, we achieve (77.4+4.2)% mAP and (92.3+1.5)% rank-1 accuracy, surpassing the state of the art by a large margin. Code is available at: https://github.com/syfafterzy/PCB_RPP

1,633 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
18 Jun 2018
TL;DR: A Person Transfer Generative Adversarial Network (PTGAN) is proposed to relieve the expensive costs of annotating new training samples and comprehensive experiments show that the domain gap could be substantially narrowed-down by the PTGAN.
Abstract: Although the performance of person Re-Identification (ReID) has been significantly boosted, many challenging issues in real scenarios have not been fully investigated, e.g., the complex scenes and lighting variations, viewpoint and pose changes, and the large number of identities in a camera network. To facilitate the research towards conquering those issues, this paper contributes a new dataset called MSMT171 with many important features, e.g., 1) the raw videos are taken by an 15-camera network deployed in both indoor and outdoor scenes, 2) the videos cover a long period of time and present complex lighting variations, and 3) it contains currently the largest number of annotated identities, i.e., 4,101 identities and 126,441 bounding boxes. We also observe that, domain gap commonly exists between datasets, which essentially causes severe performance drop when training and testing on different datasets. This results in that available training data cannot be effectively leveraged for new testing domains. To relieve the expensive costs of annotating new training samples, we propose a Person Transfer Generative Adversarial Network (PTGAN) to bridge the domain gap. Comprehensive experiments show that the domain gap could be substantially narrowed-down by the PTGAN.

1,378 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
19 Apr 2019
TL;DR: CenterNet as discussed by the authors detects each object as a triplet, rather than a pair, of keypoints, which improves both precision and recall by enriching information collected by both the top-left and bottom-right corners and providing more recognizable information from the central regions.
Abstract: In object detection, keypoint-based approaches often experience the drawback of a large number of incorrect object bounding boxes, arguably due to the lack of an additional assessment inside cropped regions. This paper presents an efficient solution that explores the visual patterns within individual cropped regions with minimal costs. We build our framework upon a representative one-stage keypoint-based detector named CornerNet. Our approach, named CenterNet, detects each object as a triplet, rather than a pair, of keypoints, which improves both precision and recall. Accordingly, we design two customized modules, cascade corner pooling, and center pooling, that enrich information collected by both the top-left and bottom-right corners and provide more recognizable information from the central regions. On the MS-COCO dataset, CenterNet achieves an AP of 47.0 %, outperforming all existing one-stage detectors by at least 4.9%. Furthermore, with a faster inference speed than the top-ranked two-stage detectors, CenterNet demonstrates a comparable performance to these detectors. Code is available at https://github.com/Duankaiwen/CenterNet.

1,199 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This paper presents an efficient solution that explores the visual patterns within individual cropped regions with minimal costs, and builds the framework upon a representative one-stage keypoint-based detector named CornerNet, which improves both precision and recall.
Abstract: In object detection, keypoint-based approaches often suffer a large number of incorrect object bounding boxes, arguably due to the lack of an additional look into the cropped regions. This paper presents an efficient solution which explores the visual patterns within each cropped region with minimal costs. We build our framework upon a representative one-stage keypoint-based detector named CornerNet. Our approach, named CenterNet, detects each object as a triplet, rather than a pair, of keypoints, which improves both precision and recall. Accordingly, we design two customized modules named cascade corner pooling and center pooling, which play the roles of enriching information collected by both top-left and bottom-right corners and providing more recognizable information at the central regions, respectively. On the MS-COCO dataset, CenterNet achieves an AP of 47.0%, which outperforms all existing one-stage detectors by at least 4.9%. Meanwhile, with a faster inference speed, CenterNet demonstrates quite comparable performance to the top-ranked two-stage detectors. Code is available at this https URL.

1,136 citations


Cited by
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Christopher M. Bishop1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Probability distributions of linear models for regression and classification are given in this article, along with a discussion of combining models and combining models in the context of machine learning and classification.
Abstract: Probability Distributions.- Linear Models for Regression.- Linear Models for Classification.- Neural Networks.- Kernel Methods.- Sparse Kernel Machines.- Graphical Models.- Mixture Models and EM.- Approximate Inference.- Sampling Methods.- Continuous Latent Variables.- Sequential Data.- Combining Models.

10,141 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
21 Jun 1994
TL;DR: A feature selection criterion that is optimal by construction because it is based on how the tracker works, and a feature monitoring method that can detect occlusions, disocclusions, and features that do not correspond to points in the world are proposed.
Abstract: No feature-based vision system can work unless good features can be identified and tracked from frame to frame. Although tracking itself is by and large a solved problem, selecting features that can be tracked well and correspond to physical points in the world is still hard. We propose a feature selection criterion that is optimal by construction because it is based on how the tracker works, and a feature monitoring method that can detect occlusions, disocclusions, and features that do not correspond to points in the world. These methods are based on a new tracking algorithm that extends previous Newton-Raphson style search methods to work under affine image transformations. We test performance with several simulations and experiments. >

8,432 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper has designed a stand-alone, flexible C++ implementation that enables the evaluation of individual components and that can easily be extended to include new algorithms.
Abstract: Stereo matching is one of the most active research areas in computer vision. While a large number of algorithms for stereo correspondence have been developed, relatively little work has been done on characterizing their performance. In this paper, we present a taxonomy of dense, two-frame stereo methods designed to assess the different components and design decisions made in individual stereo algorithms. Using this taxonomy, we compare existing stereo methods and present experiments evaluating the performance of many different variants. In order to establish a common software platform and a collection of data sets for easy evaluation, we have designed a stand-alone, flexible C++ implementation that enables the evaluation of individual components and that can be easily extended to include new algorithms. We have also produced several new multiframe stereo data sets with ground truth, and are making both the code and data sets available on the Web.

7,458 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors prove that under some suitable assumptions, it is possible to recover both the low-rank and the sparse components exactly by solving a very convenient convex program called Principal Component Pursuit; among all feasible decompositions, simply minimize a weighted combination of the nuclear norm and of the e1 norm.
Abstract: This article is about a curious phenomenon. Suppose we have a data matrix, which is the superposition of a low-rank component and a sparse component. Can we recover each component individuallyq We prove that under some suitable assumptions, it is possible to recover both the low-rank and the sparse components exactly by solving a very convenient convex program called Principal Component Pursuit; among all feasible decompositions, simply minimize a weighted combination of the nuclear norm and of the e1 norm. This suggests the possibility of a principled approach to robust principal component analysis since our methodology and results assert that one can recover the principal components of a data matrix even though a positive fraction of its entries are arbitrarily corrupted. This extends to the situation where a fraction of the entries are missing as well. We discuss an algorithm for solving this optimization problem, and present applications in the area of video surveillance, where our methodology allows for the detection of objects in a cluttered background, and in the area of face recognition, where it offers a principled way of removing shadows and specularities in images of faces.

6,783 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The working conditions of content-based retrieval: patterns of use, types of pictures, the role of semantics, and the sensory gap are discussed, as well as aspects of system engineering: databases, system architecture, and evaluation.
Abstract: Presents a review of 200 references in content-based image retrieval. The paper starts with discussing the working conditions of content-based retrieval: patterns of use, types of pictures, the role of semantics, and the sensory gap. Subsequent sections discuss computational steps for image retrieval systems. Step one of the review is image processing for retrieval sorted by color, texture, and local geometry. Features for retrieval are discussed next, sorted by: accumulative and global features, salient points, object and shape features, signs, and structural combinations thereof. Similarity of pictures and objects in pictures is reviewed for each of the feature types, in close connection to the types and means of feedback the user of the systems is capable of giving by interaction. We briefly discuss aspects of system engineering: databases, system architecture, and evaluation. In the concluding section, we present our view on: the driving force of the field, the heritage from computer vision, the influence on computer vision, the role of similarity and of interaction, the need for databases, the problem of evaluation, and the role of the semantic gap.

6,447 citations