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R. Byron Bird

Bio: R. Byron Bird is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin-Madison. The author has contributed to research in topics: Viscosity & Cauchy stress tensor. The author has an hindex of 40, co-authored 128 publications receiving 23109 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1977

5,094 citations

01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe a malicious download of the dynamics of polymeric liquids volume 1 fluid mechanics vol 1, but end up in malicious downloads, rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some harmful virus inside their desktop computer.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading dynamics of polymeric liquids volume 1 fluid mechanics vol 1. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look numerous times for their chosen readings like this dynamics of polymeric liquids volume 1 fluid mechanics vol 1, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some harmful virus inside their desktop computer.

610 citations

01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: Lightfoot as discussed by the authors, Revised 2nd Edition al precio 62,37 € de Edwin N. Lightfoot | Warren E. Stewart | R. Byron Bird, tienda de libros de medicine, Libros de quimica - Quimica
Abstract: Tienda online donde Comprar Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition al precio 62,37 € de Edwin N. Lightfoot | Warren E. Stewart | R. Byron Bird, tienda de Libros de Medicina, Libros de Quimica - Quimica

341 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GOLD (Genetic Optimisation for Ligand Docking) is an automated ligand docking program that uses a genetic algorithm to explore the full range of ligand conformational flexibility with partial flexibility of the protein, and satisfies the fundamental requirement that the ligand must displace loosely bound water on binding.

5,882 citations

Book
25 May 1984
TL;DR: An overview of diffusion and separation processes brings unsurpassed, engaging clarity to this complex topic as mentioned in this paper, which is a key part of the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum and at the core of understanding chemical purification and reaction engineering.
Abstract: This overview of diffusion and separation processes brings unsurpassed, engaging clarity to this complex topic. Diffusion is a key part of the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum and at the core of understanding chemical purification and reaction engineering. This spontaneous mixing process is also central to our daily lives, with importance in phenomena as diverse as the dispersal of pollutants to digestion in the small intestine. For students, Diffusion goes from the basics of mass transfer and diffusion itself, with strong support through worked examples and a range of student questions. It also takes the reader right through to the cutting edge of our understanding, and the new examples in this third edition will appeal to professional scientists and engineers. Retaining the trademark enthusiastic style, the broad coverage now extends to biology and medicine.

5,195 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the basic relationships are discussed in the context of vertical transfer in the lower atmosphere, and the required corrections to the measured flux are derived, where the correction to measurements of water vapour flux will often be only a few per cent but will sometimes exceed 10 percent.
Abstract: When the atmospheric turbulent flux of a minor constituent such as CO2 (or of water vapour as a special case) is measured by either the eddy covariance or the mean gradient technique, account may need to be taken of variations of the constituent's density due to the presence of a flux of heat and/or water vapour. In this paper the basic relationships are discussed in the context of vertical transfer in the lower atmosphere, and the required corrections to the measured flux are derived. If the measurement involves sensing of the fluctuations or mean gradient of the constituent's mixing ratio relative to the dry air component, then no correction is required; while with sensing of the constituent's specific mass content relative to the total moist air, a correction arising from the water vapour flux only is required. Correspondingly, if in mean gradient measurements the constituent's density is measured in air from different heights which has been pre-dried and brought to a common temperature, then again no correction is required; while if the original (moist) air itself is brought to a common temperature, then only a correction arising from the water vapour flux is required. If the constituent's density fluctuations or mean gradients are measured directly in the air in situ, then corrections arising from both heat and water vapour fluxes are required. These corrections will often be very important. That due to the heat flux is about five times as great as that due to an equal latent heat (water vapour) flux. In CO2 flux measurements the magnitude of the correction will commonly exceed that of the flux itself. The correction to measurements of water vapour flux will often be only a few per cent but will sometimes exceed 10 per cent.

4,174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Hazime Mori1

3,522 citations