scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Rachel E. Perry

Bio: Rachel E. Perry is an academic researcher from University of Haifa. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Exhibition. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 16 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Reenactment has played a vital, albeit unacknowledged, role in what has been remembered of the Holocaust from the moment the camps were liberated, performative and participatory practices were sei...
Abstract: Reenactment has played a vital, albeit unacknowledged, role in what has been remembered of the Holocaust. From the moment the camps were liberated, performative and participatory practices were sei...

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the spring of 1946, Jean Dubuffet presented the series Mirobolus, Macadam et Cie/Hautes Pâtes at the Gallery Rene Drouin this article.
Abstract: In the spring of 1946, Jean Dubuffet presented the series Mirobolus, Macadam et Cie/Hautes Pâtes at the Gallery Rene Drouin. This exhibition has rightly been cast as a breakthrough event in the cul...

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors analyze the discursive framing of Kadish's exhibition, its semiotics, and its reception as material speech addressed to a 'family of Jewish survivors' and presenting the Holocaust from a Jewish perspective through 'bonding images'.
Abstract: George Kadish (Hirsch Zvi Kadushin) is best known as the intrepid, clandestine photographer of the Kovno ghetto. But he was also the curator of one of the first Holocaust exhibitions mounted by a Jewish survivor for Jewish survivors. Even before Israel Kaplan’s November 1945 call to ‘collect and record,’ Kadish was already working as a zamler (collector), salvaging and gathering thousands of photographs from diverse sources in order to assemble an archive of Nazi persecution and Jewish suffering. From this collection, he selected 300 photographs for a traveling exhibition entitled ‘Pictures of the Ghetto’ that was shown in the Landsberg and Feldafing DP camps before being showcased at the first Congress of the She’erit Hapleitah, organized by the Central Committee of the Liberated Jews in the American-occupied zone of Germany, on January 27, 1946. Grouping the photos thematically, rather than chronologically or geographically, he collated them onto large, portable black panels captioned with descriptive titles in Yiddish. This article analyzes the discursive framing of Kadish’s exhibition, its semiotics, and its reception as ‘material speech’ addressed to a ‘family of Jewish survivors’ and presenting the Holocaust from a Jewish perspective through ‘bonding images.’ Whereas the antifascist exhibitions of the immediate postwar period marginalized Jewish victimization, Kadish’s showcased Nazi brutality while fostering a community in suffering for the survivors.

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Phelan as mentioned in this paper, The Politics of Performance, Peggy Phelan. London: Routtedge, 1993. xi + 207 pp., figures, notes, bibliography, index.
Abstract: Unmarked: The Politics of Performance, Peggy Phelan. London: Routtedge, 1993. xi + 207 pp., figures, notes, bibliography, index.

493 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: One of the most popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye as discussed by the authors, but it is difficult to find the book in the book store around your city.
Abstract: It's not surprisingly when entering this site to get the book. One of the popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye. You may be confused because you can't find the book in the book store around your city. Commonly, the popular book will be sold quickly. And when you have found the store to buy the book, it will be so hurt when you run out of it. This is why, searching for this popular book in this website will give you benefit. You will not run out of this book.

292 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It would be most reasonable not to use the concept ''nation'' or its derivatives at all in political discourse as discussed by the authors, and it would be more reasonable to use ''nation" instead of ''nation''.
Abstract: It would be most reasonable not to use the concept \"nation\" or its derivatives at all in political discourse.

194 citations