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Rachel Sutton-Spence

Bio: Rachel Sutton-Spence is an academic researcher from University of Bristol. The author has contributed to research in topics: Sign language & British Sign Language. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 37 publications receiving 1017 citations.

Papers
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Book
18 Mar 1999
TL;DR: Conventions used in the text 1. Linguistics and sign linguistics 2. BSL in its social context 3. Constructing sign sentences 4. Questions and negation 5. Mouth patterns and non-manual features in BSL.
Abstract: This is the first detailed explanation of the way British Sign Language works and is the product of many years' experience of research and teaching sign linguistics to deaf and hearing people. It assumes no previous knowledge of linguistics or sign language, and is not structured around traditional headings such as phonology, morphology and syntax. Instead it is set out in such a way as to help learners and their teachers understand the linguistic principles behind the language. There are sections on BSL grammar and also on the use of BSL, including social acceptability in signing, variation, and poetry and humour in BSL. Technical terms and linguistic jargon are kept to a minimum, and the text contains many examples from English, BSL, and other spoken and sign languages. The book is amply illustrated and contains exercises, as well as a reading list for further study.An accompanying 90-minute DVD is available from Talk With Sign Books. To find out more, visit http://www.talkwithsign.com/linguistics-british-sign-language-p-741.html.

418 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: A vehicle occupant restraint system which inflates upon impact is described in this paper, which includes lap and shoulder harnesses which resemble conventional restraint systems in their uninflated state, as well as an additional inflatable bladder which cushions the chest area and minimizes head rotation toward the chest.
Abstract: A vehicle occupant restraint system which inflates upon impact. The restraint system includes lap and shoulder harnesses which resemble conventional restraint systems in their uninflated state. Upon impact the harnesses inflate as does an additional inflatable bladder which cushions the chest area and minimizes head rotation toward the chest.

115 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Turn-taking in the conversation of hearing people has been the subject of considerable attention, but the way conversation is organized by Deaf conversationalists has received less attention as mentioned in this paper, which has been assumed by researchers in the field of Deaf Studies that Deaf interactants orient to a one-at-a-time model since the medium of communication is visual rather than sound based, participants can attend to only those sources of talk that they can see.
Abstract: This paper will focus on the turn-taking patterns of Deaf signers and will compare them with turn-taking patterns found in spoken interaction. Turn-taking in the conversation of hearing people has been the subject of considerable attention, but the way conversation is organised by Deaf conversationalists has received less attention. This paper reports on a small project involving conversational data obtained from two Deaf friendship groups, one all-female and one all-male. Our main aim was to establish whether Deaf interactants orient to a one-at-a-time model of turn-taking, or whether there was any evidence to suggest they can also orient to a more collaborative model. It has been assumed by researchers in the field of Deaf Studies that Deaf interactants orient to a one-at-a-time model since, where the medium of communication is visual rather than sound based, participants can attend to only those sources of talk that they can see. The paper also examines the data to see if there are any gender differences in the way Deaf interactants organise conversation.

106 citations

Book
12 Nov 2004
TL;DR: Sign Language Poetry as discussed by the authors is a branch of sign language poetry and is used in the Hang Glider Trio Five Senses and Three Queens Afterword by Paddy Ladd.
Abstract: Acknowledgements Preface Some General Points about Sign Languages What is Sign Language Poetry? Repetition In Sign Language Poetry Symmetry and Balance Neologisms Ambiguity Themes in Sign Poetry Metaphor and Allusion The Poem and Performance Blended Sign Language Poetry and Spoken Language The Hang Glider Trio Five Senses and Three Queens Afterword by Paddy Ladd Appendix: Texts of Poems Notes Bibliography Index

52 citations


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01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The authors examines translation dilemmas in qualitative research and explores three questions: whether methodologically it matters if the act of translation matters, and whether it is worth the effort of translation.
Abstract: The focus of this article is an examination of translation dilemmas in qualitative research. Specifically it explores three questions: whether methodologically it matters if the act of translation ...

968 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Data acquisition, feature extraction and classification methods employed for the analysis of sign language gestures are examined and the overall progress toward a true test of sign recognition systems--dealing with natural signing by native signers is discussed.
Abstract: Research in automatic analysis of sign language has largely focused on recognizing the lexical (or citation) form of sign gestures as they appear in continuous signing, and developing algorithms that scale well to large vocabularies. However, successful recognition of lexical signs is not sufficient for a full understanding of sign language communication. Nonmanual signals and grammatical processes which result in systematic variations in sign appearance are integral aspects of this communication but have received comparatively little attention in the literature. In this survey, we examine data acquisition, feature extraction and classification methods employed for the analysis of sign language gestures. These are discussed with respect to issues such as modeling transitions between signs in continuous signing, modeling inflectional processes, signer independence, and adaptation. We further examine works that attempt to analyze nonmanual signals and discuss issues related to integrating these with (hand) sign gestures. We also discuss the overall progress toward a true test of sign recognition systems?dealing with natural signing by native signers. We suggest some future directions for this research and also point to contributions it can make to other fields of research. Web-based supplemental materials (appendicies) which contain several illustrative examples and videos of signing can be found at www.computer.org/publications/dlib.

574 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of The Symbolic Species: The Co-Evolution of Language and the Brain, by Terrance Deacon, 1997.
Abstract: A review of The Symbolic Species: The Co-Evolution of Language and the Brain, by Terrance Deacon, 1997. New York: W.W. Norton, 527pp. ISBN 0393317544. $29.95 USD. Hardcover.

449 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The idea that iconicity need also be recognized as a general property of language, which may serve the function of reducing the gap between linguistic form and conceptual representation to allow the language system to “hook up” to motor, perceptual, and affective experience is put forward.
Abstract: Current views about language are dominated by the idea of arbitrary connections between linguistic form and meaning. However, if we look beyond the more familiar Indo-European languages and also include both spoken and signed language modalities, we find that motivated, iconic form-meaning mappings are, in fact, pervasive in language. In this paper, we review the different types of iconic mappings that characterize languages in both modalities, including the predominantly visually iconic mappings found in signed languages. Having shown that iconic mapping are present across languages, we then proceed to review evidence showing that language users (signers and speakers) exploit iconicity in language processing and language acquisition. While not discounting the presence and importance of arbitrariness in language, we put forward the idea that iconicity need also be recognized as a general property of language, which may serve the function of reducing the gap between linguistic form and conceptual representation to allow the language system to "hook up" to motor, perceptual, and affective experience.

435 citations