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Ramona Birau

Bio: Ramona Birau is an academic researcher from University of Craiova. The author has contributed to research in topics: Stock exchange & Stock market. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 43 publications receiving 178 citations.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: The CoVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the economies around the world and the economic fallout from preventive measures such as lockdown is enormous. It has massive repercussions for the sharing economy a...
Abstract: COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the economies around the world and the economic fallout from preventive measures such as lockdown is enormous. It has massive repercussions for the sharing economy a...

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a systematic review of fully integrated Banking 4.0 and the application of the technologies of Industry 5.0 is presented. But, the authors focus on the performance of successful global banks in applying these technologies and do not provide an overview of the practical applications of these technologies.
Abstract: The purpose of the present paper is to provide an advanced overview of the practical applications of Banking 4.0 in Industry 4.0. This paper examines the technology trends in the Fourth Industrial Revolution and identifies the key indicators behind the creation of a strategic map for the fourth-generation banks and their readiness to enter Industry 4.0. This paper examines a systematic review of fully integrated Banking 4.0 and the application of the technologies of Industry 4.0 and illustrates a distinct pattern of integration of Banking 4.0 and Industry 4.0. One of the prominent features of this article is the performance of successful global banks in applying these technologies. The results showed that Banking 4.0 in Industry 4.0 is an integrative value creation system consisting of six design principles and 14 technology trends. The roadmap designed for banks to enter Industry 4.0 and how they work with industrial companies will be a key and important guide.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a combined fuzzy SWARA-PROMETHEE approach was used to prioritize tourism destinations, where five main criteria and 20 sub-criteria were selected, which are the reasons for choosing a country as a medical tourism destination.
Abstract: Today, medical tourism is one of the fastest growing sectors of the tourism industry around the world. Medical tourism can contribute to the sustainable development and economic dynamism of countries. Therefore, in this study, we prioritize the world’s leading countries in medical tourism for Iranians. First, five main criteria and 20 sub-criteria were selected, which are the reasons for choosing a country as a medical tourism destination. In this paper a combined fuzzy SWARA-PROMETHEE approach was used to prioritize tourism destinations. The acronym PROMETHEE stands for Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation method and represents an useful MCDA (Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis) tool. On the other hand, SWARA acronym means Step-wise Weight Assessment Ratio Analysis. The criteria were weighted using the fuzzy SWARA approach. In the following, using the PROMETHEE approach, we prioritized eight countries as tourism destinations, then we identified criteria related to sustainability of medical tourism destinations and prioritized medical tourism destinations using these criteria as the contributions of this paper. The weights obtained for criteria “Abilities of skilled staff,” “Applied medical equipment,” “Marketing capability,” “Type of service provided,” and “Application of information and communications technology” were 0.176, 0.232, 0.108, 0.395, and 0.089, respectively. The results show that medical tourism destination priorities for Iranians are India (Phi = 0.1396), Malaysia (Phi = 0.1128), Panama (Phi = 0.0976), Mexico (Phi = 0.0790), Singapore (Phi = 0.0096), Taiwan (Phi = −0.0442), Brazil (Phi = −0.1747), and Costa Rica (Phi = −0.2196), respectively. Negative Phi values indicate below average performance of those countries and positive Phi values indicate above average performance of those criteria. The results indicate that countries with negative Phi values should be strengthened relative to the improvement of some criteria.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jan 2021
TL;DR: In this paper, product reviews are extremely important to implement online MARs, since customers can choose to buy products online without certain sensory experiences, such as touching, smelling or tasting.
Abstract: Customers can choose to buy products online without certain sensory experiences, such as touching, smelling or tasting. Consequently, product reviews are extremely important to implement online mar...

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used the ARIMA model to predict the share prices of selected pharmaceutical companies in India, listed under NIFTY100, using a sample size of 782 time-series observations from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019 for each selected pharmaceutical firm.
Abstract: Many investors in order to predict stock prices use various techniques like fundamental analysis and technical analysis and sometimes rely on the discussions provided by various stock market analysts. ARIMA is a part of time-series analysis under prediction algorithms, and this paper attempts to predict the share prices of selected pharmaceutical companies in India, listed under NIFTY100, using the ARIMA model. A sample size of 782 time-series observations from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019 for each selected pharmaceutical firm has been considered to frame the ARIMA model. ADF test is used to verify whether the data are stationary or not. For ARIMA model estimation, significant spikes in the correlogram of ACF and PACF have been observed, and many models have been framed taking different AR and MA terms for each selected company. After that, 5 best models have been selected, and necessary inculcation of various AR and MA terms has been made to adjust the models and choose the best adjusted ARIMA model for each firm based on Volatility, adjusted R-squared, and Akaike Information Criterion. The results could be used to analyze the stock prices and their prediction in-depth in future research efforts.

26 citations


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753 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Lexus and the Olive Tree as mentioned in this paper is a classic example of a tree-shaped car and it can be seen as a metaphor for the relationship between cars and Olive trees.
Abstract: (2000). The Lexus and the Olive Tree. Journal of Economic Issues: Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 232-234.

536 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In challenging times, all leaders would like to improve their strategic decision-making capabilities, and a handful of well-regarded techniques to improve strategic decision making are used by global companies, and, perhaps, one or more of these techniques might work in your organization.
Abstract: In challenging times, all leaders would like to improve their strategic decision-making capabilities. I make an effort to read widely in the management literature, including the McKinsey Quarterly. A recent piece1 in that publication caught my attention, and I would like to summarize aspects of it for our readers. A handful of well-regarded techniques to improve strategic decision making are used by global companies, and, perhaps, one or more of these techniques might work in your organization. Let me elucidate a few of them. Experts agree that in any complex human endeavor we need to harness bias; that is, rather than trying to tune out bias, we might encourage it and attempt to balance it with effective decision making. A tool to further this notion is the balance sheet, whereby a leader might ask his direct reports to “Tell me what is good about this particular opportunity, tell me what is bad about it, do not tell me your judgment yet; I don’t want to know.”1 This starts the evaluation process without having to justify and, thereby, frees opinions. Internal leaders are allowed to give their best insights and fully consider the ideas of others. The balance sheet process “mitigates a lot of the friction that typically arises when people marshal the facts that support their case, while ignoring those that don’t.”1 Another technique is creating a culture where failure is not a wrong answer. This process starts with an acknowledgement that Plan A “probably is based upon flawed assumptions and that certain leap-of-faith questions are fundamental to arriving at a better answer.”1 Even in moderate-sized organizations, there is often a sense that Plan A is going to succeed because it’s well analyzed, it’s vetted, it’s crisp, it looks great on the spreadsheet — and it’s the one that everybody has to execute. The reality is that it may not work, and having a corporate culture that recognizes that Plan B might be pretty good gets people off the blame game and rewards those who are able to make a mid-course correction. Yet another technique might be listening to the little voice. This is very difficult for leaders, because no matter how important these individuals are, they may find it difficult to grapple with diverse opinions, especially among their direct reports. Leaders who can change their opinion based on the strength of the arguments around the table are going to be more successful on average than those who cannot. Facing tough people choices is another important skill set for improving strategic decision making. Often, leaders tend to compromise. “It’s very easy to close your eyes and say warm bodies are better then no bodies,”1 but it turns out that it’s best to be unyielding regarding the hiring decision. One should always look for good listeners who are capable of adapting. This is the single most important leadership trait outside of pure competence in one’s field. Another important tool is knowing when to let go, which could mean shutting down a particular drug development program or outsourcing part of another. These are often the hardest decisions to make and the ones that don’t get nearly enough focus. The most difficult decisions are the legacy ones — “the historical investments, the things that are just easier to chip away at rather than make a tough decision.”1 It’s best to have no preconceived commitment to a legacy business. Lastly, a leader’s ability to strike the right balance between decisiveness and timeliness is critical. The best management brains believe that timeliness trumps perfection; to translate, sometimes “the most damaging decisions are the missed opportunities, the decisions that didn’t get made in time. If you are creating a category of bad decisions you’ve made, you need to include all the decisions you didn’t get to make because you missed the window of time that existed to take advantage of an opportunity.”1 This is a skill that can be developed over time. Cultivating internal critics, facing tough people choices, and knowing when to let go are important components of the toolkit that comprises strategic decision making. Healthcare is no different than any other complex business. We can all improve our strategic decision making as we seek to utilize resources parsimoniously and derive the greatest benefit from the people power that our organizations represent. As always, I am interested in your views. You can reach me by e-mail at «ude.nosreffej@hsan.divad». Also, please visit my blog at: «http://nashhealthpolicy.blogspot.com».

216 citations